A Qashqai Creation with Grace Du Prez

Over the past few weeks, we have featured artists who have used the 3Doodler as a creative outlet, made works of fine art, and even high fashion. Grace Du Prez went beyond anything attempted before when she led a team of 11 artists in creating a life-size Doodled Nissan Qashqai – the largest Doodle ever made.

Grace Du Prez

Grace Du Prez is not new to Doodling. “I first started using the 3Doodler about 3 years ago when I was commissioned by Maplin Electronics to make a hat for Ladies Day at Ascot,” she says. “I then got in touch with 3Doodler directly and made a few pieces including jewellery, a vase and some lampshades.”

But her latest project was bigger and more complex than anything Grace – or anyone else – had ever done before.

Grace was contacted about an ambitious new idea – to use a 3D pen to create an entire car. The project would be to Doodle a full-size Nissan Qashqai. “I was really excited as nothing had ever been made this size before and it sounded like a really fun project.”

"Nothing had ever been made this size before" Share

Based in London, Grace assembled a team of 11 artists and designers from the UK, and students from Kingston University. But before they could begin, they needed a plan.

“The initial conversations were mainly about feasibility and trying to estimate how long it would take,” says Grace. “We then had to plan all the logistics of how to make it and what the design would be.”

Stitching It Together

With multiple artists, there were many different visions and ideas to consider, and different elements that had to be decided. “In the beginning planning stages, we discussed how it could be made and what the surface might look like. There were lots of meetings to discuss the different options,” Grace explains. “The whole planning took a couple of months.”

When it came time to start constructing the car, Grace showed the team how to use the 3Doodler. As Grace teaches regular workshops for how to use the pen, she was able to get the team Doodling quickly.

But when 11 artists are working on the same project, everyone needs to be on the same page. “Everyone had a slightly different style of Doodling – just like everyone’s handwriting is different,” Grace explains. “So to keep it consistent across the whole car we would get everyone to swap places every so often.”

And it was crucial to have open lines of communication throughout the project. “At the start of every day we would all have a chat and make a plan for which bits we were going to do,” Grace says. “We started off getting all the key lines, which were quite thick to give a bit of structure and support and also highlighted the design features of the Qashqai. Then we could start filling in the bigger areas with more of a web-like surface.”

No one had ever before attempted making a structure of this size using a 3D pen. “That was the biggest challenge for me; as it had never been done before, there was a little element of the unknown,” says Grace. “But that just added to the excitement of it.”

"Seeing the Doodled car next to the real life Qashqai really shows what an amazing achievement it all was" Share

And Grace and her team were prepared for the challenge. “I was always confident as we had planned it really well and thought of every eventuality,” she says.

Working 800 hours over 17 days, and using over 8,000 strands of PLA and ABS plastic, this massive-scale project moved from concept to reality. “Seeing the final video for the first time, I was so proud of the team and how hard everybody had worked,” Grace says. “Seeing the Doodled car next to the real life Qashqai really shows what an amazing achievement it all was.”

The completed Doodled Qashqai is being transported to the Brand Innovation Centre in Barcelona, where it will be on display to the public.

“Working on the Qashqai in a team and creating something large scale as a group was a great experience,” says Grace. “I feel like now we have done this anything is possible so I’m looking forward to what the future has in store!”

See more of Grace’s incredible work here.

Mixed Media Creations with Ilma Wasty

We’re continuing our series of features focusing on our talented and creative 3Doodler Community members. From hobbyists to professionals, these Doodlers have taken their imagination off the page and into the world around them to create incredible bodies of work.

Ilma Wasty

“My first attempt at Doodling was almost accidental,” says Ilma Bushra Wasty. The 28-year-old recently completed her MA in Interior and Spatial Design at the Chelsea College of Art at the University of Arts in London.

Ilma recently finished a large-scale mixed-media project for her MA in interior and spatial design, combining the delicacy of Doodled pieces with industrial concrete. Her final project, titled Revealing the Pattern, combined delicate patterns made with the 3Doodler and concrete rocks, steps and tiles.
"Like the pen or pencil, the 3Doodler was a new tool to draw and express." Share

“I got my 3Doodler when I came to the UK for my masters,” says Ilma, who is originally from Pakistan. “I had intended to use it for recreational purposes.”

But in the first unit of her masters program, Ilma explored new concepts and mediums. “Like the pen or pencil, the 3Doodler was a new tool to draw and express,” she says. “I do not view the 3Doodler as one art form, but rather as a tool which can be customized according to needs.”

“The first thing I Doodled was tracing out a small cup. This was not very successful, as it was my first attempt,” she admits.

But Ilma improved quickly, and found that skills she had gained as a child helped her when controlling a 3D printing pen. “The 3Doodler for me is a drawing tool, which allows me to draw a pattern that is 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional at the same time,” she says. “The way the plastic extrudes reminded me of henna pattern making when I was younger and I would draw patterns on other people’s hands.”

This bridge between traditional culture and modern life became the basis of Ilma’s final project in her MA. “Revealing The Pattern is inspired by old rundown buildings in interior Sindh, Pakistan,” she explains. “It had stemmed from a desire to develop a personal spatial expression rooted in culture.”

For this project, Ilma wanted to make craftsmanship a key feature of the final installation. “I used the 3Doodler to highlight the importance of hand craft and a contemporary interpretation of a very traditional craft from the Islamic patterned tiles,” she says.

“These tiles are proposed for an outdoor environment, where the cement has the opportunity to weather like at the seaside,” explains Ilma. “The pattern, therefore, reveals over time rather than being immediately visible.”

It’s this same sense of patience that Ilma says is the key to working with the 3Doodler. “Patience goes a long way,” she says, “but the beauty is also in the mistake. Doodles do not need to be perfect. Each mistake makes the particular object unique and beautiful.”

3Doodler MoMA Window Display

When 3Doodler was first approached by MoMA to be featured in their Design Store window displays in New York City, the whole team was thrilled. But everyone soon found out how much work goes into a window display—especially one as involved as this!

Here’s a closer look at the process of designing, building, and installing the display, along with spotlight on the incredible Doodles that featured in it.

Creating a Display

The 3Doodler team only had 60 days to dream up a concept, get the display built, and install everything at both the 53rd Street and Soho MoMA Design Stores. The aim was to showcase the accessibility, simplicity and creative potential of the 3Doodler.

The team went through several rounds of late-night brainstorming, finally settling on a final rough sketch before racing to get everything built in time. The design features a wave that goes across the window and four uses for the 3Doodler: Build, Design, Teach, and Play. The wave itself is meant to represent extruded plastic, while the lines in the back are giant strands of filament.

To build the display, 3Doodler joined forces with Chad Lynch and his team at Heywood Productions in Red Hook, Brooklyn.

The waves were made from laminated wood and coated with several layers of shiny white plastic, while the background tubes were painted PVC pipes. The giant 3Doodler tip was made using foam and wood, and then coated with resin and paint.

Once the pieces were built, installing everything turned out to be the easiest part. The team converged on the MoMA Design Store windows, and put on quite a show for passersby with all the miming, pointing, and photo snapping that it took to get things just right.

But the final result was well worth the effort.

Hero Doodle: Metamorphosis Lamp

The window display featured several Hero Doodles to showcase the diverse uses and creative scope of the 3Doodler. The first was the Metamorphosis Lamp by Broolyn-based artist Rachel Goldsmith.

“My artwork is inspired by two sets of contrasts,” Rachel explains. “In my environment, the contrast is between the man-made and nature; and in materials, the contrast is between the control I have over the media and how the media naturally interacts. This inspiration manifests itself in my final pieces through contrasts in color, in line, shape and form, and in textures.”

Rachel explains that she is constantly reacting to how the plastic lands on the canvas, often not in the way that she originally intended: “I definitely have some control over the material, for example I choose the colors, but I certainly do not have total control. It’s almost like every other move has to be a ‘beautiful oops.'” This is why she refers to what she creates as “painting with plastic”, because for Rachel, it is much less like drawing or Doodling and much more like painting. It’s about pushing an artistic piece until she has a complete composition that has both balance and movement.

Hero Doodle: The Boat

Measuring two feet long and about 1.5 feet high, this was certainly an epic achievement and a labor of love by 3Doodler’s own co-founder Daniel Cowen.

Dan began by Doodling the deck of the boat flat on a large piece of paper to get the size and shape right. He then propped up up deck at the right height and Doodled the ribbed hull downwards to create a frame. “I used the existing skeleton to effectively weave a mesh surface,” Dan explains, “and then used that surface as a base to create a thick stable top layer.”

Then followed the complex process of adding the masts and finer details for the water and waves. “I lined up plastic tubes on the table top to act as rollers,” says Dan, “and proceeded to drape melted plastic over them to form the shape of the wave.”

For final details, Dan added a dolphin, starfish, anchor and life saver ring. “I had to Doodle the rope very slowly in mid-air to get that ‘cast out to sea’ look,” he says.

Hero Doodle: Geometric Lampshade

“When I found out we were going to take over the windows at the Museum of Modern Art I wanted to do something new with the 3Doodler that would utilize it in a completely different way,” says 3Doodler’s own Creative Director Faraz Warsi.

“We always tell people you can use the 3Doodler to decorate your house or office,” Faraz says. “Taking inspiration from our new design intern’s passion for origami I wanted to build a lampshade made completely out of triangles.”

Faraz decided to use 3Doodler’s new transparent Clearly line of PLA filament to showcase the range. He began by designing a simple stencil with 12 triangles in eight different PLA colors—two clear colors and six lighter colors from the regular PLA line.

“Once we had all our triangles on the table we tried to figure out the best way to piece it all together,” Faraz says. “The possibilities were endless, with different color combinations, patterns, and angles to create depth.” Faraz ultimately decided to go with a classic cylindrical shape, with 16 triangles in each row.

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