6 New Themed Kits for 3Doodler Create

Decorate your home, cater a party, or recreate architectural masterpieces in meticulous detail.

Introducing six new project kits for 3Doodler Create. With a wide range of activities to choose from, these kits have everything you need to create, including detailed stencils, step-by-step instructions, and specially selected plastic.

Doodled Designs: Tiffany Candle Holders

Louis Comfort Tiffany first pioneered his Art Nouveau Tiffany Lamp glass designs in 1878, taking inspiration from Roman and Syrian medieval glass techniques to create a new type of glass known for its brilliant colors.

Now you can recreate the detail and magic of Tiffany’s glass with a kit inspired by his designs.

The Tiffany Candle Holder brings the Art Nouveau style to three original nature scenes. The square Hummingbird Field, the round Koi Pond, and the Fall Butterfly with a multi-level edge and 3D butterfly attachment.

Lifelike Doodling: Flower Bouquet

Bring the fine art of flower arrangement into your home with a bouquet that will never wilt.

Create endless array of possibilities by balancing large blooms like Gerbera Daisies, Roses, and Sunflowers with the delicate accents of Baby’s Breath, Queen Anne’s Lace, and Ferns.

An entire garden is at your fingertips to create a unique arrangement for every room.

Festive Functions: Party Decor

Looking to throw a picture-perfect party that shows off your creative side?

Whether you’re hosting a fun birthday bash, cozy holiday celebration, or upscale dinner party, this collection of party accessories lets you customize your decor to suit your event.

With baubles, napkin rings, place cards, cupcake toppers and more, you can be sure to throw a party to remember.

Cultural Icons: Tuk Tuk

Recreate a staple of Southeast Asian street life, and take on the Tuk Tuk.

Imagine yourself barreling down the streets of Bangkok or ambling through the ruins of Angkor Wat in the back of these iconic motorized vehicles.

Moving parts and minute details in the project kit stencils let you bring a piece of modern history to life.

Amazing Architecture: Fallingwater

Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater

Celebrate Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th birthday with a carefully crafted recreation of one of his most famous buildings.

Fallingwater showcases Wright’s ideals of creating harmony between architecture and nature.

In collaboration with the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, the Licensed Project Kit includes detailed stencils created from the original Fallingwater floor plans, so anyone can create Wright’s masterpiece in miniature scale.

Modernist Masterpieces: Farnsworth House

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's Farnsworth House

Apply your modeling skills to the modernist movement, with this recreation of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s most iconic structure.

The simple geometric construction of The Farnsworth House makes modeling it an exercise in precision, as the smallest details and lines can affect the end result.

Honor this National Historic Landmark with this Licenced Project Kit, created in collaboration with the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

All six of these new 3Doodler Create Project Kits are available now, exclusively from our online store. What will you create?

DIY Accessories to Customize Your Bicycle

At 3Doodler we’re always looking for new and innovative ways to try and DIY—Doodle it yourself. For our latest exploration into Doodled additions, we decided to take our show on the road.

Avid cyclist (and 3Doodler Marketing Director) Kelley Toy teamed up with 3Doodler Product Development Engineer Samson Wong to conceptualize and road test a series of Doodled solutions for two common cycling needs: a drink bottle cage, and an action camera handlebar mount. While these solutions were prototyped and tested on a road bike, all of the designs could easily be adapted for a mountain bike, touring bike, or daily commuter.

The Prototyping Process

“I started by borrowing a bottle cage from Kelley,” Samson says. In order to start the design process, Samson needed a jumping off point. Using common accessories that any cyclist might need was the first step to getting an idea for a customized design.

While a water bottle cage attachment may seem like a simple enough design concept, Doodling one from scratch is a more complicated task. Getting the tension and strength just right while having it fit the bottle snugly is important, all the while making a sturdy enough design that would hold up to actual use.

It was also important for Samson to understand how the piece would be attached to the bike. “I needed an actual bottle cage to trace the holes used for mounting it to the bike,” Samson explains. “I made a template based on the original so I could Doodle the holes at exactly the right measurements.”

For his first prototype, Samson used the same design concept as Kelley’s old bottle cage, with two “arms” coming from the mounting to grip the bottle. “After the first Doodled trial, I found that the arms were a bit too weak,” Samson says. His Doodled version needed the right balance of strength and flexibility.

"After the first Doodled trial, I found that the arms were a bit too weak." Share

In his next prototype, he knew better what improvements he needed to make. “The second design focused on reinforcing the two arms,” he says. “To make it strong enough I Doodled three layers of ABS, building up the plastic to be roughly 5mm thick.”

When choosing which filament to use, Samson had to consider the different properties of ABS and PLA. “ABS is a bit more flexible,” he explains. “PLA is strong, it’s rigid, but it’s a little bit brittle. So for this type of project, ABS is a better choice, because the cage has to flex a little bit to get the bottle in and out.”

Testing and Re-working

Once Samson had a prototype in hand, it was time for biking veteran Kelley to test it out. After taking the new Doodled bottle cage through a variety of terrains, Kelley was pleased with the results, but still felt there were more improvements to be made. “The cage performed well and there was no sign the bottle was going to launch at any point, and it was very easy to get the bottle in and out while riding,” she says. “But I heard a small crack the first time I loaded the bottle into the cage, and the fit around the bottle was not snug and this reduced contact area with the bottle.”

As an end result, Kelley felt a sturdier design was necessary. “The bottle flexes the plastic cage a lot, and I would ultimately not feel confident about the durability of the design,” she says. It was back to the drawing board for Samson. “I did some research, checking how other bottle cages look,” he says. “I found a few designs that had a whole ring around the bottle instead of the two arms.”

"At first I thought this design was going to be a fail, as off the bike it was tough getting a bottle in and out." Share

With Kelley’s feedback in mind, Samson thought this new design could provide the stability and tighter fit around the bottle that the first prototype lacked. “Molding the cage to the bottle, this one has got a lot of gripping power and a lot of friction, so the bottle won’t move anywhere when you’re riding,” he says.

“At first I thought this design was going to be a fail,” Kelley admits, “as off the bike it was tough getting a bottle in and out.” But Samson was confident this new design would be an improvement.

And Kelley was pleasantly surprised. “It is totally rock solid!” she says. “Once loaded on the bike—and with a small adjustment on my part on the angle—I loaded and unloaded the bottle while riding easily.” Kelley also found another bonus of the new prototype: “I also like the minimal look of this design on the bike.”

Creating concepts for practical DIYs requires a continual process of prototyping and testing, but Samson says that in the end you can wind up with some great results.

The first step, he recommends, is to copy. “Copy existing products, and then go from there,” he explains. “Modify it to fit your needs.”

Innovation for Creative Solutions

Samson used this same principal when creating an action camera mount for Kelley’s bike. After researching existing mounting solutions, he was able to better understand how he could begin to construct his own. “Some mounts have a hinge on one side for opening and closing,” he says, “but it’s kind of hard to make a hinge out of Doodled plastic, so I made a whole ring in one piece, and made it a little flexible.”

Adapting a commercial design for custom use was exactly what Kelley was looking for. “While camera mounts for round handlebars such as mine are commercially available, I liked that the mount was custom designed for my handlebars and therefore I could place it exactly where I wanted so it didn’t get in the way,” she says. “Also the Doodled mount is considerably less bulky and lighter than the commercial ones available, which is always important for weight-conscious roadies.”

When designing the mount, Samson was faced with a new array of issues and problems to overcome. During the prototyping process, he says it’s important to experiment and take risks to find solutions. In this case, Samson found that mixing materials was the best fix for the mount. “I had to use FLEXY on the inside of the ring to provide grip,” he explains. “The inside surface was too smooth, and when it grabbed the handlebar it would still move a little bit even when you screwed the bolt really tight.” When faced with a problem, finding creative solutions is key. “I put the FLEXY inside basically to act like a tire tread to grip onto the handle bar,” he says.

And road-testing confirmed his mixed-filament experiment. “The addition of FLEXY provided excellent grip, and meant there was no rotation even when riding on rough bumpy surfaces,” Kelley says.

With DIY projects like this, Samson says it’s all about adapting designs to fit what you can do, while getting the results you want. “It might not be the best looking product, or be good for selling to the public,” he says, “but if it works, then it’s a good DIY project.”

Making Models True to Life

Creating scale models is all about detail. To create stunning replicas that remain true to the original takes careful planning and precise execution.

Cornelia Kuglmeier knows just how detailed a Doodled model can be. An artist and teacher with a passion for architecture, Cornelia has successfully recreated several detailed models of world-famous buildings. In addition to creating a scale replica of the Sagrada Familia basilica in Barcelona, she’s also worked on miniature versions of iconic Modernist architectural masterpieces like the Farnsworth House and Fallingwater.

Cornelia says that when using the 3Doodler to create scale models, all it takes to get started is an idea, a steady hand, and a lot of patience.

Not Every Building Has Four Plain Walls

“You can choose any type of building you like,” Cornelia says, “or invent a new one!” Style, period, or complexity of the structure aren’t as important as your personal interest and passion.

If creating a unique building of your own design, Cornelia recommends making a draft of the building using 3D software first. “Make sure you have all the walls, the roof and the floor,” she says. “Show every side to have a good idea on what it will look like when it’s finished.”

When creating a replica of an existing building, it may be easier to know how the finished piece should look—but this also means execution must be precise. Cornelia says when making models of famous buildings, she always begins by finding a floor plan. “This is crucial!” she says. The floor plan allows for better construction, even if your main concern is how the outside of the building will look.

"You need a stencil for every side of every element of your building. Walk around it in your imagination and count corners and spaces for every floor. " Share

In addition, Cornelia says it’s important to find photos, plans or drawings for every side of the structure. “I also hunt for detailed pictures that show decoration or any other special things,” Cornelia reveals, as often these small additions can provide the key to capturing the essence of the architecture.

Detail may also determine the size of the model. “The more detail you want to show, the bigger your Doodled building will be,” Cornelia explains. “If necessary, simplify forms or leave out details that are less important.”

With floor plans, reference photos, and a concept of size and scale, you can begin to create your stencils. “You need a stencil for every side of every element of your building,” Cornelia says. “Walk around it in your imagination and count corners and spaces for every floor. Not every building has just four plain walls.”

Plain Edges and Clean Corners

When recreating any piece of architecture, an awareness of materials can be just as important as understanding the structure. “Dots, short strokes, thin, medium or thick plain lines, checkered spaces, zig-zag or chevron patterns—all result in different surfaces which can mimic different materials,” Cornelia explains.

Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater

When creating a scale replica of Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous Fallingwater, Cornelia had to test a variety of techniques in order to achieve all the different textures which came from various construction materials and the natural environment around the house. The trick when creating a model is to experiment and test what your 3Doodler can do. “Choose what looks most similar to what you want to build.”

But precision is key when it comes to model building. “Plain edges and clean corners are essential to create fine rectangular buildings,” Cornelia says. “It helps to draw the outlines first and then fill in the spaces.”

For curved areas, Cornelia recommends finding something to use as a mould rather than attempting to Doodle free-hand. “Think about hot-airing a flat Doodled piece around a bottle, vase, or whatever you have that suits the size you need,” she says.

Time and Patience

When constructing your model, relying on a scaled version of the original floor plan can help ensure the form and shape are correct. Cornelia recommends working from bottom to top, and inside to outside, which is what she did when creating her scale model of the Farnsworth House, designed and constructed by Modernist architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

“Try as much as possible to Doodle your pieces together at invisible spaces,” Cornelia says, “from the inside, from underneath, and so on.”

Farnsworth House by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Cornelia says not to be afraid to use outside materials to clean up stray strands, like scissors, knives or other blades. When building any structure, having edges fit together is key to recreating an accurate portrayal of the final building.

But most important of all, says Cornelia, is time and patience. Precision is vital, and mistakes do happen. Enjoy the process, and keep the final result in sight.

If you’re looking to try your hand at creating scale models, 3Doodler will be releasing both of these amazing buildings as 3Doodler Create Project Kits in collaboration with National Trust for Historic Preservation and Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, so that anyone can re-create these eye-catching structures themselves.

5 Lifesaving DIY Doodles for the Home

When it comes to the things we use most around the home, small breaks are bound to happen with the general everyday wear and tear of life. It’s unavoidable, but that doesn’t mean it’s not fixable!

With your 3Doodler in hand, you can DIY your own fixes and repairs for all sorts of breaks and damages that can happen around the house.

1. Broken Scissors Just Won’t Cut it

It’s tragic when an otherwise great tool is wrecked by one little bit of broken plastic. That’s what happened to these scissors. While the blades are still fine, they won’t work properly when the plastic handles are broken.

Fortunately that’s a quick fix with the 3Doodler! To fill in the cracks, PLA will create a strong, solid hold. You can also weld the plastic together with the Create’s hot tip. Using a combination of both will give a lasting solution that will make your scissors stronger than ever.

A bit of extra plastic and a little welding keeps your scissors snipping

2. Saving a Stand for the Kitchen

When this cutting board stand started to crack, it looked like the end for this handy storage unit. What good is a stand that won’t hold up?

Luckily all it took was a bit of repair work with the 3Doodler to make it like new – and possibly even stronger than before! With added PLA plastic which welded and reinforced the stress points of the stand, it can now continue to hold up under constant kitchen use.

3. Zapping a Problem Zipper

There’s nothing more frustrating than a broken zipper. Whether on a bag, jacket, purse or any other zip-able item, you need that zipper to do it’s job!

Fortunately, there’s this handy fix and video tutorial from Creative World to help you Doodle your way back to a fully functional zipper.

4. A Doodle DIY for Your Deck

A quick Doodled replacement makes this home repair a snap!
The plastic ring that hold the umbrella in place on this deck table kept breaking. And a wobbly umbrella can upset the whole balance, and ruin an afternoon outdoors!

Fortunately, all it takes is your 3Doodler and a bit of measuring, and you can create your own custom ring that withstand even more wear and tear than the original. You can use ABS or PLA to create the ring, and could even add some FLEXY around the bottom and inside to give it a non-slip upgrade!

5. A 3DIY Fix for Your 3D Prints

It’s the repair that sparked the whole idea for the 3Doodler: what do you do when your 3D printer misses a line, or a 3D print breaks or cracks? Fill it in using your very own hand-held 3D printer, of course!

The 3Doodler is perfect for fixing damages or accidents that can happen to your 3D prints. Don’t waste the time and effort involved in 3D printing, just make a quick repair and you’re good to go.


With so many options to fix and repair, the 3Doodler can save not only your tools and home items, but can also save you lots of money by avoiding costly replacements!

Not sure where to start when it comes to using your 3Doodler around the house? Check out our Hot Tips section to get insider ideas on how get the most out of your 3Doodler, and have you Doodling like a pro.

Show us your 3Doodler DIY fixes by tagging us @3Doodler and using #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate

How the Living World Inspires Creativity

Nature has been a source of inspiration for artists, writers, architects and designers for centuries. As Henry David Thoreau once stated, “we can never have enough of nature.” And it’s clear that our 3Doodler community feels the same!

The entries for the Living World category for our 2016 3Doodler Awards showed us not only the diversity of our community, but also how each person can take different inspiration from the same concept. From the ocean to the air, our Doodlers showed us the best of what the Living World has to offer, and the variety of ways the spirit of each creature can be shown through artistic expression with the 3Doodler.

Under the Sea

Inspired by the hundreds of different fish species that can be found at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, our Living World Award winner Yuval Mor showcased the thriving ecosystem that can be found beneath the waves.

Yuval wasn’t the only one who dove deep to find creative inspiration. Mindy Nam’s wireframe octopus took a more minimalist and abstract approach to capturing the spirit of her subject. With clean lines and the stunning addition of glow-in-the-dark details, Mindy’s octopus shows off the sometimes hidden side of nature’s beauty.

"… I have nature and art and poetry, and if that is not enough, what is enough?"-Vincent Van Gogh Share

All Creatures Great and Small

Our community of Doodlers showed us that size isn’t what matters when it comes to inspiring subjects. Even the smallest spider, like the one below from Yuval Mor, or this grasshopper and lady bug from Eduardo Pires can be a source for creativity!

But larger creatures can also leave a big impact. We saw many incredible creations inspired by the variety of life on land, like this elephant from Jonathan Breibart with artistic Doodled details.

"Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better."-Albert Einstein Share

Fowl is Fair

But our community couldn’t be limited by gravity of course, and many chose to let their creativity take flight with winged subjects.

Diogo Nunes de Sousa chose two iconic birds of the rainforest to celebrate the colorful diversity found with our feathered friends.

And Levittown Public Library showed us the power of creativity in education with a carefully constructed peacock, which they named Rajiv.

"Art is the child of nature in whom we trace the features of the mothers face."-Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Share

Gone but not Forgotten

Our world has been around for billions of years, and has seen creatures that may not be living now but were an important part of the history of life on our planet.

Paul Mahoney chose to take inspiration from the living world of long ago, with this Allosaur which he named “Allie”.

"To an artist, there is never anything ugly in nature."-Auguste Rodin Share

Inspiration is all Around

When looking for your next creative project, simply look to the world around you. From the ocean to the skies, our living world is filled with inspiring animals and creatures both in the present and the past.

Get creative, and find new ways to show the spirit of your subjects!

"It is the marriage of the soul with Nature that makes the intellect fruitful, and gives birth to imagination."-Henry David Thoreau Share

A Very Doodled Christmas

We’re kicking off the Christmas countdown with a specially Doodled 12 Days of Christmas made with the 3Doodler Start! Sing along and get in the holiday spirit as we Doodle our way through this classic carol!

ON THE FIRST DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

A partridge in a pear tree!

ON THE SECOND DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

Two Turtledoves, and a partridge in a pear tree!

ON THE THIRD DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

Three French hens, two Turtledoves, and a partridge in a pear tree!

ON THE FOURTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

Four calling birds, three french hens, two Turtledoves, and a partridge in a pear tree!

ON THE FIFTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

FIVE GOLD RINGS!

ON THE SIXTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

Six geese a-laying!

ON THE SEVENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

Seven swans a-swimming!

ON THE EIGHTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

Eight maids a-milking!

ON THE NINTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

Nine ladies dancing!

ON THE TENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

Ten lords a-leaping!

ON THE ELEVENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

Eleven pipers piping!

ON THE TWELFTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS, MY TRUE LOVE GAVE TO ME:

Twelve drummers drumming!

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from 3Doodler!

Show us your festive Doodles by tagging us and using #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate.

A Model Town from a Model Classroom

We often discuss the classroom applications for 3Doodler in STEM subjects, or as a way for students to learn about emerging technologies. But the educational benefits of 3Doodler aren’t just restricted to math and science, as English teacher Eva Reilly shows.

Reilly challenged her high school English class to make a model of their home town – Phillips, Wisconsin – as a way to inspire proper research and learn how to find reliable and trustworthy sources.

The class constructed their eight-foot model of the downtown street as part of their non-fiction unit in their English curriculum. And as with any non-fiction project, the first step is research.

“They read and wrote reviews of articles, memoirs, letters from books, newspapers, periodicals, and the internet about Phillips,” says Reilly.

The students took note of notable historical events that had affected the town, and shaped how it looked – like the Phillips Fire of 1894.

This fire swept through the entire downtown area the students were recreating, levelling many of the original structures. In the rebuilding efforts, the major buildings were required to be made from brick as a fire-safety measure.

"History is not just about events of way back in the day; it is the making of our past, present, and future" Share

Knowing the history and events which resulted in how the town currently looks gave new meaning to the construction of the model. “After learning about the history of Phillips and its development, students picked business buildings downtown to reconstruct on a scale model,” Reilly says. “They didn’t realize how difficult the project would be at first.”

Students visited the buildings in person, taking photos to use in the construction of their model to make sure they could be as accurate as possible. They also talked to residents with first-hand knowledge of the buildings’ histories and how they had been renovated throughout the years, all while keeping notes in fieldwork journals to chronicle the project.

To create the models, Reilly introduced some cross-subject integration by having the student figure out the correct dimensions for each building using algebra and geometry. “They learned we need math in everything we do, not just in the classroom,” Reilly says. “Sometimes, quite frankly, they were confused as to whether they were in math, science, history, or English class, but the process sure kept them engaged!”

Using 3Doodler pens, the students got to work constructing their model town. They needed to refer to their notes, photos, and research to make the buildings accurate for a realistic model. “The students learned that English is not just reading about fiction or nonfiction material, but it is also a bit of a history lesson,” Reilly says. “History is not just about events of way back in the day; it is the making of our past, present, and future.”

"As teachers, we learn that hands-on projects help students apply what they learn in school to the world around us" Share

Reilly is continuing the project again with future classes. The model – which is currently on display at the Phillips Public Library – will continue to grow as students each year research a different area of the town.

“As teachers, we learn that hands-on projects help students apply what they learn in school to the world around us – predictable and unpredictable,” explains Reilly. “Students learn that, in the end, everything we learn in school comes together – English, history, math, science, and technology.”

Looking for more ways to bring 3Doodler into your classroom?
Check out our dedicated EDU section for classroom tips, lesson plans, and exclusive EDU bundles for educators.

Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia with Cornelia Kuglmeier

We have seen members from our creative Community do incredible things, from art to fashion to full-size cars. Cornelia Kuglmeier has been a dedicated member of our 3Doodler Community from the very beginning, and last year took on a project that required the precision, attention to detail, and artistic ability that only she could bring.

The Sagrada Challenge

“I like big challenges,” says Cornelia Kuglmeier. A school teacher from Germany, Cornelia has worked with 3Doodler on incredible artistic pieces in the past. But earlier this year, Cornelia completed her largest and most detailed project to date: a scale model of the Sagrada Familia.

Laying out the facade

Designed by Spanish architect Antoni Gaudi (1852-1926), the Sagrada broke ground in Barcelona in 1882 and remains unfinished to this day. In addition to the immense complexity of the building, the completion of the Sagrada was made even more difficult with Gaudi’s sudden death, after which his notes were lost for many years and then later partially destroyed by anarchists in 1936.

"I’m a big planner. I just don’t Doodle without a clue on how to begin and how to move on from each point" Share

To recreate the Sagrada, Cornelia researched Gaudi’s design plans extensively as preparation for creating her model with the 3Doodler.

“I’m a big planner. I just don’t Doodle without a clue on how to begin and how to move on from each point,” Cornelia says. “So I first did some very long and some very detailed research. Then I made myself stencils where I counted on heights and relations on the different parts, and even drew in some decorations to see how much space it would take.”

Immense Complexity

“Gaudi had a very unique idea of building and architecture,” Cornelia explains. “You basically have the outer structure of a Gothic church in the Sagrada Familia, but the sustaining structure on the inside is completely different from what we know of the Gothic epoch.”

Gaudi's hanging chain model

To add to the complexity, nearly every aspect of Gaudi’s architectural design was new and unheard of. “He designed the curved towers by building what he called a ‘hanging model’,” Cornelia says, describing how Gaudi hung ropes weighed down with sand bags to create curved lines for the shapes of the towers. “Their shape, modelled on parabolas, was Gaudì’s way of creating self-supporting structures that would overcome the faults of Gothic architecture.”

Innovative aesthetic twists also provided special challenges to the original builders. “The most difficult part of construction on the real Sagrada was the sustaining structure in the naves holding the roofs and towers,” she says. “Gaudi wanted the pillars inside the church to be shaped like trees with branches, supporting the arches and symbolizing the leafy roof of a forest. Such a system of pillars and arches had never been built before.”

Unwavering Perfectionism

Gaudi’s genius and innovation meant a slow construction process. “I think one of the reasons it is not finished now is because the technique was very different and they had to go step by step to invent it,” Cornelia says. “And it’s huge. It’s meant to be the tallest Christian church when it’s finished.”

"It was obvious back then that Gaudi would not live to see his project finished" Share

But Gaudi was never in a rush to see the Sagrada Familia completed. “It was obvious back then that he would not live to see his project finished,” explains Cornelia. “But when they told him that, and asked if he wanted to simplify some things or stick to knowledge they had already about architecture, he said he wouldn’t change anything because his client had all the time to wait, and wasn’t in a hurry. He meant God of course.”

144 Years in the Making

While the Sagrada Familia is planned to be completed in 2026 (144 years after it first broke ground), Cornelia’s Doodled model took only four months – although with its own unique challenges.

The first major challenge was researching the plans of Gaudi’s original design so the model could stay as close to his vision as possible. “The original ground plot and floor plan was essential,” she says. “Without it, assembling and planning would not have been possible. The main structure is a so-called “latin cross”, the church itself is some sort of modified Gothic style. As those are very strictly planned, the original ground plot studies were very helpful.”

But other parts of the design plans were more difficult to research.

Constructing the Facades

The finished Sagrada will have three detailed façades depicting different chapters from the life of Christ. Cornelia wanted to include as much detail on each façade as possible. “This was complicated though, as only one façade is fully built, the Nativity Façade,” she says. “I could not find a photo of the fully built Passion Façade, so I had to stick to models, which are sometimes slightly simplified.”

"The figures were so tiny. I had to simplify some areas, and reduce others. Some things I had to invent" Share

“The Glory Façade was completely built after model views. What made my work so difficult was that there are actually at least two models; one very colourful, highly decorated model, supposed to be made by Gaudi himself, but only available in very small picture sizes; and one white, rather even and slick 3D-printed model.”

assiduous attention to detail

Staying True to Gaudi’s Vision

Sagrada Pre-assembly

Cornelia decided to rely as much as possible on Gaudi’s own model. “I chose to use green for the turrets in the Glory Façade instead of brown, as the model made by Gaudí himself showed the turrets in green,” she says. “I tried very hard to give every façade as much decoration as possible to give it its typical look; I also tried to put as much decoration as possible onto the towers, but this was limited with both, as the figures were so tiny. All in all I had to simplify some areas, and reduce others. Some things I had to invent, like the decoration of the apse – it’s not built yet, and there was no picture to be found that depicted it big enough.”

1,050 Strands, and Countless Hours

Working up to 10 hours a day, and eventually using 1,050 strands of plastic, Cornelia’s Sagrada Familia model began to take shape.

“I didn’t count how many times I wanted to throw it against a wall,” Cornelia admits. Even when working with stencils and detailed research, mistakes can still happen, and with a project as precise as the Sagrada Familia, even a millimetre difference could throw off proportions and make assembly difficult.

“I Doodled all the parts first, put together the towers, the facades and the church naves and then started assembling from the middle – Christ’s tower – in each direction,” Cornelia says. “Having them all at the right height, sitting straight and at the right angles was very difficult; besides, as organic forms meet geometric forms, putting the pieces together was not always easy, or the form itself grew so edgy that my hand with the pen almost didn’t fit in.”

"It wouldn’t have that impact if it was just plain" Share

And sometimes Cornelia had to get creative to make sure the church came together properly. when assembling the towers, she found space too tight to Doodle from the outside, and the structure was too delicate to lay it on its side without risking damage. “So when I had to assemble this part, I gently pushed it half over the edge of my table – just enough so it wouldn’t fall down – and I kneeled under it and Doodled the whole thing upside down, like Michelangelo painting his Sistine Chapel,” she says. “It didn’t take me as long as Michelangelo though, and I didn’t go blind,” she adds, laughing.

Oven-baked windows

The Devil is in the Detail

For Cornelia, the most important part of her Doodled model was making sure to include as much decorative detail as she could, even when it came to creating the angels on the facade. “It wouldn’t have that impact if it was just plain or only had bits and blobs,” she says. “That was the most delicate work. I was sitting there and forming the hot plastic with pincers to make them even thinner or make some sort of gap between the head and body to keep them as small as possible but visible.”

“I also oven-baked the windows, trying to give them their real colors, making them smooth and shiny in contrast to the brown and rough appearance of the church’s walls,” she says.

"I wanted to finish it. I saw it growing, and it was not in vain" Share

Despite the frustration and hours of dedication to both research and construction, Cornelia says that once the pieces began to come together she felt the whole ordeal was worth it. “I wanted to finish it. It was a big challenge, and I like big challenges,” she says. “I saw it growing, and it was not in vain.”

The Finished Sagrada Familia 3Doodle

To learn more about Cornelia, check out her profile at 3DoodlerPRO.com. For more images head to this fantastic piece on designboom.

A Qashqai Creation with Grace Du Prez

Over the past few weeks, we have featured artists who have used the 3Doodler as a creative outlet, made works of fine art, and even high fashion. Grace Du Prez went beyond anything attempted before when she led a team of 11 artists in creating a life-size Doodled Nissan Qashqai – the largest Doodle ever made.

Grace Du Prez

Grace Du Prez is not new to Doodling. “I first started using the 3Doodler about 3 years ago when I was commissioned by Maplin Electronics to make a hat for Ladies Day at Ascot,” she says. “I then got in touch with 3Doodler directly and made a few pieces including jewellery, a vase and some lampshades.”

But her latest project was bigger and more complex than anything Grace – or anyone else – had ever done before.

Grace was contacted about an ambitious new idea – to use a 3D pen to create an entire car. The project would be to Doodle a full-size Nissan Qashqai. “I was really excited as nothing had ever been made this size before and it sounded like a really fun project.”

"Nothing had ever been made this size before" Share

Based in London, Grace assembled a team of 11 artists and designers from the UK, and students from Kingston University. But before they could begin, they needed a plan.

“The initial conversations were mainly about feasibility and trying to estimate how long it would take,” says Grace. “We then had to plan all the logistics of how to make it and what the design would be.”

Stitching It Together

With multiple artists, there were many different visions and ideas to consider, and different elements that had to be decided. “In the beginning planning stages, we discussed how it could be made and what the surface might look like. There were lots of meetings to discuss the different options,” Grace explains. “The whole planning took a couple of months.”

When it came time to start constructing the car, Grace showed the team how to use the 3Doodler. As Grace teaches regular workshops for how to use the pen, she was able to get the team Doodling quickly.

But when 11 artists are working on the same project, everyone needs to be on the same page. “Everyone had a slightly different style of Doodling – just like everyone’s handwriting is different,” Grace explains. “So to keep it consistent across the whole car we would get everyone to swap places every so often.”

And it was crucial to have open lines of communication throughout the project. “At the start of every day we would all have a chat and make a plan for which bits we were going to do,” Grace says. “We started off getting all the key lines, which were quite thick to give a bit of structure and support and also highlighted the design features of the Qashqai. Then we could start filling in the bigger areas with more of a web-like surface.”

No one had ever before attempted making a structure of this size using a 3D pen. “That was the biggest challenge for me; as it had never been done before, there was a little element of the unknown,” says Grace. “But that just added to the excitement of it.”

"Seeing the Doodled car next to the real life Qashqai really shows what an amazing achievement it all was" Share

And Grace and her team were prepared for the challenge. “I was always confident as we had planned it really well and thought of every eventuality,” she says.

Working 800 hours over 17 days, and using over 8,000 strands of PLA and ABS plastic, this massive-scale project moved from concept to reality. “Seeing the final video for the first time, I was so proud of the team and how hard everybody had worked,” Grace says. “Seeing the Doodled car next to the real life Qashqai really shows what an amazing achievement it all was.”

The completed Doodled Qashqai is being transported to the Brand Innovation Centre in Barcelona, where it will be on display to the public.

“Working on the Qashqai in a team and creating something large scale as a group was a great experience,” says Grace. “I feel like now we have done this anything is possible so I’m looking forward to what the future has in store!”

See more of Grace’s incredible work here.

90’s Back In Style

Last week we looked at how 90s Nostalgia is in full swing, and could also be contributing to a new wave in creativity.

So we decided to get creative as we look at 90s inspired trends making it big in 2016! The 90s are back in style, and we’ve put together three Doodled outfits combining the best of 90s-chic, and modelled by our stylish trio of mannequins.

Just Jelly

Get The Look: killer shades, cropped sweater, mom jeans, and jelly shoes

“Mom jeans” got a bad rap after their heyday in the 90s, but 2016 is bringing comfy-lazy-chic back into fashion! Get creative and pair your mom jeans with a cropped sweater, baby-doll T or spaghetti-strap tank. Finish off the look with a shimmery pair of jelly shoes and killer shades for a total 90s throwback.

Overall Fashionista

Get The Look: striped shirt, overalls, platform shoes

Every 90s cool kid remembers rocking overalls. Now the fashion world’s most utilitarian way to dress is back on trend! This is easily the most creative trend to get behind. Overalls are an artist’s dream, making easy cover-up for paint splatters and still showing your easy-going nature! Slouchy style, easy to match, and loads of pockets – overalls are leaving last year’s romper trend by the wayside.

Grunge Chic Cute

Get The Look: fabric bow headband, Ray Bans, plaid shirt, ripped jean shorts, Dr. Martens

The 90s were when fashion-conscious grunge rockers discovered that Dr. Martens are the perfect shoe for ANY outfit! Tortured musicians and other creatives know that whether it’s a plaid skirt, cute sundress, or even ripped jean shorts – there’s no better shoe for bringing back that 90s grunge style. Pair with a plaid shirt, and make it cute with a scrunchie or fabric headband!

Doodle up your favorite 90s trends in 2016 and be sure to tag us @3Doodler and use #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate!

Picture-Perfect Party Decorations

Everyone wants to throw a picture-perfect party! We’ve chosen 5 party ideas and upgraded them with Doodled variety to take your decorations to the next level. Doodle-IY your way to throwing a uniquely epic party.

Fresher Fruit Refreshments

Decorated mason jars are all the rage for a summer themed party. We’ve seen watermelon decorations all over! But why just stop with watermelon? Bring on a variety of fruity fun and vary your flavors with Doodled additions!

If you’re going to be Doodling onto glass, PLA and FLEXY are the plastics to choose! Both stick great to glass surfaces, so you can upgrade your glassware with any Doodled design you desire!

All That Glitters

There’s something about gold that gives a party that upscale, glamorous feeling. In our Doodled versions, the details really shine and you can show off your skills not only as host but as artist as well! Float like a feather, or make hearts flutter by adding some accents of color with a butterfly napkin ring with FLEXY flying wings.

If you’re looking to add some glitz to your Doodles, check out the FLEXY gold and Gangsta’ Gold PLA.

Stir Things Up

Customized drink stirrers are full of class and elegance. And with your 3Doodler in hand, you can create your own and personalize them to make your party unique! Get specific with sayings perfect for your party theme, or Doodle ones with your guests’ names for an unforgettable party favor!

Looking for ideas on how to improve your Doodle writing? Be sure to check out our Hot Tips section for loads of quick ideas on how to get the most out of your 3Doodler!

Go Wild

When you’re looking for cuteness overload for your next party why not take inspiration from nature? Doodle up some animal details and dress up your fruit! Not only do they make adorable decorative accents, but these awesome animals can do double-duty as a healthy snack for your party-goers too!

All of our plastics are biodegradable and recyclable. Our new 3Doodler Start eco-plastics even biodegrade in your home compost!

Let Your Imagination Take Flight

We love the idea of taking something ordinary and making it extraordinary with Doodled additions. With that in mind, we decided to wing it and created a flock of flawless cupcakes, complete with flamingos, swans, and peacocks!

If your next party is picture-perfect with Doodled decorations, be sure to show us! Use #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate when you post!

3Doodler for DIY

While the 3Doodler can be used to make incredible sculptures and works of art, it’s practical applications can’t be overlooked.

With a tool as diverse as this, the DIY options are endless. Here’s eight examples of simple fixes or DIY ideas for your 3Doodler.

1. Give Your Phone an Upgrade

Looking for a style switch up? Doodle yourself a new phone case. No need to look like everyone else, make yourself a case that will give your mobile phone some personal flair while keeping it safe.

2. Make Your Own Doodled Clock

Make a statement with your home decor and create your own interior design pieces with personal flare. For wall pieces, hard-setting PLA works great, and will help you Doodle pieces that will last.

3. Repair Snaps in a Snap

Instead of buying a new pair of glasses, fix them with your 3Doodler. PLA adheres to metal better than ABS, so it works great for quick fixes like this one. Simply join the two pieces and Doodle around the break point. This little fix makes for quite the talking point too!

4. A DIY That Holds Water

Repairing cracks in plastic cups or soap dishes is easy with your 3Doodler. Both ABS and PLA work well for this kind of quick fix. ABS is excellent for plastic-on-plastic Doodling because of its higher melting point which helps weld plastics together, and PLA has naturally strong bonding properties. The PLA Clearly range also makes for more discreet fixes!

5. Doodle Your Own Wallet

Use FLEXY to create a hand-made plastic wallet of your very own! For a more fabric-like look, push the nozzle of your 3Doodler flush with the surface you are Doodling on, moving it quickly to form a thin film of Doodled plastic.

6. Repairing Your Home Appliances

3Doodler came to the rescue to fix the shell of this broken vacuum cleaner. A simple repair saves time and money, and gets your back on track with minimal fuss!

7. Lighten Things Up

Get creative and make your own lampshade. This lampshade was constructed for our display window at the MoMA Design Store. Made from over 50 small triangles, the pieces were welded together like a mosaic to produce this stunning lampshade. Pick your own colours and style – it’s simply a matter of joining the pieces.

8. Mix Doodling for Dynamic Projects

Louis DeRosa was able to combine a passion for electronics and the 3Doodler by using it to help make his own Hexacopter. As you can see, when you start to apply your imagination to 3Doodling, the sky really is the limit!


With so many options to fix and repair, the 3Doodler is your go-to DIY tool for any occasion!

Not sure where to start when it comes to using your 3Doodler for DIY? Check out our Hot Tips section to get insider ideas on how get the most out of your 3Doodler, and have you Doodling like a pro.

Show us your 3Doodler DIY fixes by tagging us @3Doodler and using #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate

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