Facing the Future with Kim Hyun-Kyung

Kim Hyun-Kyung wanted to take her makeup artistry to the next level. “Of the various materials used in makeup, I was looking for something that could express a new and creative object.”

Hyun-Kyung, a 24-year-old makeup artist from Seoul, South Korea, turned to the 3Doodler. “I was able to create a three-dimensional design of various feelings through actual Doodling,” she says.

Using a 3D pen allowed Hyun-Kyung to explore more shapes and concepts in combination with visual effects and makeup. “It was interesting to me that I could embody the desired form in three dimensions without going through a complicated process,” she says, “and it was good that I could create a shape or figure imagined in my head as a solid itself.”

"I could embody the desired form in three dimensions without going through a complicated process, and it was good that I could create a shape or figure imagined in my head as a solid itself." Share

But just as with any new medium, Hyun-Kyung’s first attempt with the 3Doodler wasn’t as smooth as her stunning beauty shots make it seem. “I wanted to follow the demonstration video making a 3D square, so I turned on the power and drew a square on the paper,” she remembers. “However, I was so unskilled and had to struggle ten times to get it to look good.”

Now Hyun-kyung has been using the 3Doodler for over a year, and there is no sign of struggle in her creative makeup combinations.

Taking inspiration from costume and runway shows, Hyun-Kyung felt that three-dimensional additions could take the drama of the catwalk to a new level. “I devised a makeup design according to the costume used in fashion shows,” she explains. “After understanding the atmosphere and color of the fashion show first, I chose an outfit that might be the most eye-catching when combined with the 3Doodler, and made the work after drafting a design with illustration.”

A look inspired by Iris van Herpen

Hyun-Kyung was especially inspired by bold designers who freely explore new shapes and dimensions, like Alexander McQueen and Iris van Herpen, a leading designer of 3D-printed fashion design.

"I chose an outfit that might be the most eye-catching when combined with the 3Doodler, and made the work after drafting a design with illustration." Share

Inspired by van Herpen’s 2011 Fall/Winter collections, Hyun-Kyung created her first unique 3D-makeup look. “Looking at the costume reminded me of the feeling of splashing water in the bathtub,” she says. “It took about four hours to make this look, and I captured the outline with clear PLA to show the wavelength of the water.”

It’s one of the pieces Hyun-Kyung is most proud of. “It was a look that many people were interested in, when we were in the studio on the day we shot the 3Doodler makeup.”

For other designs, she found that the FLEXY filaments were the most practical for creating wearable additions to makeup. “It’s comfortable when attached to the face because the FLEXY material is elastic, so it’s possible to form it to fit the facial structure of a person,” she explains. “I like black FLEXY the most. Black is good for expressing a sophisticated, chic, and dramatic feeling.”

A look inspired by the 2016 earthquakes in South Korea

“But not all of my works are inspired by fashion shows,” Hyun-Kyung adds. In 2016, South Korea was rocked by a total of 470 earthquakes and subsequent aftershocks reaching up to 5.8 in magnitude. “Many people were afraid,” says Hyun-Kyung. “These earthquakes occurring one after another were judged to be a warning from nature that we take life for granted.” To reflect the worry and concern of these natural disasters, she created a custom design inspired by the quakes. “It shows the cracks of the earth to raise awareness for the environment,” she explains.

Hyun-Kyung sees 3D printing and 3D pens like the 3Doodler as the way forward for all fashion, whether in makeup, runway shows, costumes, or cosplay. And she wants to help lead the way in the 3D trend. For her next project, she wants to blend the line between fashion, makeup and art. “I want to continue to use the 3Doodler in makeup to express three-dimensional designs which can show a variety of feelings when seen from various angles.”

Creative Couture in 3D

"And now, I’m just trying to change the world, one sequin at a time."-Lady Gaga Share

Sequins may not be what 3Doodler is all about, but just like Lady Gaga we’re looking to change things – one strand at a time!

Our community has shown us time and again how 3D elements can mix with fashion design to create something new and wonderful for wearable art. And the entries we saw for our 2016 3Doodler Wearable Award presented a runway of fashion-forward Doodles unlike any we had ever seen.

"Playing dress-up begins at age five and never truly ends."-Kate Spade Share

Fashion is a form of creative and personal expression. This is exactly what Carolyn Laing showed us with her incredibly detailed Doodled bra. The hot pink and black color combination, along with the rocker-chic style really shows off the creative personality behind this bra.

"Fashion should be a form of escapism, and not a form of imprisonment."-Alexander McQueen Share

And what better form can escapism take than with masks? These delicately Doodled masks by Heather Baharally showed the many different faces fashion can take. Starting with one basic pattern, Heather showed how creativity and imagination can lead to so much more when you think outside the template. With a designers eye, fashion can be transformative – just like with these masks which transform the wearer into something else completely!

"People will stare. Make it worth their while."-Harry Winston Share

Erica Grey has shown us before how the worlds of fine art and fashion can blend with wearable works of art. For this year’s 3Doodler Awards, she showed us a different side to her Doodled collection. The golden headpiece and matching corset she presented looks fit for a queen, and is part of Erica’s new bridal collection. Wedding fashion is becoming increasingly daring as brides look for styles which reflect their own personalities, and Erica’s pieces show how customized 3D pieces can create the ultimate statement!

"In order to be irreplaceable one must always be different."-Coco Chanel Share

And different is always what we’re looking for. Seeing our creative community break boundaries and Doodle outside the lines is always exciting for us, especially when the results are as stunning as this.

Aikaterini Kedikoglou took inspiration from coral reefs, but the incredible necklace she created not only managed to capture the beauty of nature, but went beyond simple representation with it’s creative form and carefully matched colors. While each individual element may seem simple enough, the piece as a whole showed us a design and form we had never seen before – securing her the win for the Wearable Award.

"Fashion is not necessarily about labels. It’s not about brands. It’s about something else that comes from within you."-Ralph Lauren Share

Creativity and fashion can go hand-in-hand, and while you can always look to the world around you for inspiration, a true unique style can only come from you.

So get creative, and show us what your inner fashionista can do!

Creating Fine Art and Fashion with Erica Gray

Our 3Doodler Community is as diverse as they are creative. This month we’re featuring members who have inspired us with their body of work, incredible projects, or in the way they have brought their imagination to life using the 3Doodler.

Erica Gray’s futuristic creations combine fine art and high fashion into wearable sculptures – each with a focus on 3D technology.

ERICA GRAY
"It has been great to be able to form ideas and play with concepts in a spatial environment." Share

Erica’s artwork refuses to be neatly categorized. “The fusion of technology, fashion, the analogue, the digital combinations as well as a dash of animalistic imagery inspires much of my new work,” she explains.

Each new project Erica embarks on shows a new side of her futuristic creativity. A part-time graphics illustrator and sculptor from Australia, Erica got her first 3Doodler from our first Kickstarter campaign.

“Over time my spatial skills and confidence with the 3Doodler have grown allowing me to explore new structures and formation in my work,” she says. “It has been great to be able to form ideas and play with concepts in a spatial environment, and have it stay in place and be able to analyse it as an object rather than a series of sketches.”

Big Bang (to Being) Bra

Erica’s work often combines 3D printing and design technology with hand-drawn 3D pen additions, as seen in Big Bang (to Being) Bra. This computer drawn and conceived bra combines digitally processed 3D printing with hand-sculpted additions made with the 3Doodler.

“It was a collaboration with my partner Zoran Zivanovic,” Erica explains. “He did all of the 3D printed parts, and I did the freehand Doodles, and we even added lighting to it. It was a fun project to work on.”

While the entire piece is mixed media, Erica says the majority is 3D technology. “And you can reprint it when it wears out,” she adds.

Erica is no stranger to large-scale wearable pieces made with a 3D pen.

“My first 3Doodled piece, Crystal Matrix, is my favorite,” she says. “It was a large piece to start with, and I went through an array of emotions whilst making it – mostly worry that it would never get finished, followed by a tremendous sense of satisfaction that it was indeed complete, and came out how it was designed to look.”

Now Erica is putting the finishing touches on her latest piece, Future Relic, which she will exhibit in a Fashion Technology display at the Telstra Perth Fashion Festival next month. “Over the last few years I have worked very hard establishing my professional art career,” says Erica. “In these last years, I have relied heavily on the 3Doodler to produce my sculptural and wearable works.”

Future Relic
"The 3Doodler is also a great way of prototyping an idea in real-time." Share

For Erica, the combination of structural results with freehand design is what draws her to the 3Doodler. “It’s the combination of great materials and ease of use which has made my 3Doodler one of my favorite go-to art tools,” she says. “It is also a great way of prototyping an idea in real-time – this doesn’t balance right, cut it away. Redo that part, perfect.”

Erica says when it comes to Doodling, go big. “Get totally immersed, and don’t be afraid to start your project at a large scale,” she says. “Working in plastic is very forgiving, and any little imperfections can easily be trimmed out and reworked.”

Forming High-Fashion

As a hand-held 3D printer, the 3Doodler opens up a world of possibilities, uses, and applications. This week we look at how the 3Doodler hit the runway with high-fashion wearable forms.

Artist and creator Erica Gray’s Forms Organic demonstrates how free-hand constructions with the 3Doodler can lead to incredible and unique creative fashion.

Forms Organic

Forms Organic was made using the 3Doodler and ABS plastic in combination with other materials to create a masked headpiece and torso section. The wearable sculpture is a bespoke one-of-a-kind artwork. The piece is inspired by organic figures and animalistic imagery, expressed using a skeletal structure, tails, teeth and claw-like elements.

“It took a few weeks to produce,” explains Erica. “I had a model booked and a deadline to work towards which helped me really focus.”

Creating a large-scale high-fashion piece was a new step for Erica. “While my work is essentially art based, Forms Organic is also a wearable piece, which meant it took a little longer getting the intricacies of the fit right for a moving subject,” she says.

Every aspect of Forms Organic was constructed by hand. “I pre-selected the elements I wanted to utlize within the piece,” Eric says, “such as the polymer teeth, claws and nylon tail – which I also sculpted from scratch.”

Forms Organic

Once the additional pieces were created, Erica then got to work with her 3Doodler. “The main bulk of the piece is then 3Doodled around, through, or within those elements,” she says. “I used roughly sketched stencils for some of the joins, and once those parts were ready I just assembled the form, building up layers of filament over select areas to exaggerate and construct the skeletal ridges.”

"I usually work from sketches, however in this case I just let it evolve." Share

Erica was working only with a loose plan of where to go and how to proceed. “I usually work from sketches, however in this case I just let it evolve,” she explains. It was a process fitting for the nature of this piece and helped inspire the title of Forms Organic. “My sculpted works are often themed on organic forms and animalistic imagery, and this piece captures those fluid forms as well as some more rigid skeletal sections.”

Erica says the process helped inspire her for future works and opens up a new realm of possibilities for wearable, high-fashion projects. “I usually produce wearable pieces that stand as a whole, encompassing any accessories as a part of it’s whole,” she says. “Saying that, while I am not actively pursuing accessories as a direction it does have me intrigued. The idea would be to design individually stylised, fluid plastic pieces for arms, legs, shoes, collars – art as accessories.”

Fashion Focus with Patrick Tai

“I looked and looked for fabrics with repetitive lines, shapes, and unique textures,” says fashion designer Patrick Tai. “I didn’t have much luck, so I decided to improvise and sort of create my own texture.”

The search for something new was what led Patrick to the 3Doodler. A recent Fashion Design graduate from the Art Institute of Charlotte, Patrick was looking for a way to express his unique vision and aesthetic.

“My inspiration comes from geometric shapes, modern architecture, and unique textures,” he explains. “I want the texture of my garments to reflect my inspiration, and that presented a challenge.”

"I want the texture of my garments to reflect my inspiration, and that presented a challenge." Share

When he found the 3Doodler, Patrick knew right away it would be the perfect match for his designs. But it took some trial and error—and a lucky mistake—for him to discover the perfect mix of fashion and Doodling. “I originally started by experimenting with ABS plastic to get familiar with the 3Doodler,” he explains. “I started running out of plastic filaments, so I purchased more. I accidentally purchased the new FLEXY strands, and liked the flexibility of it more.”

As he Doodled more with the FLEXY plastic, Patrick’s design began to take shape, and an entire dress was created using only the 3Doodler. “Most of the dress is made with FLEXY plastic, with some ABS plastic at the edges for support,” he says. “The dress made completely with the 3Doodler took me just under 100 hours, not including the accessories.”

From that first dress, Patrick expanded his line to include more wearable dresses and accessories with Doodled accents and additions. “I’ve been lucky enough to showcase some of my designs in NCFA (North Carolina Fashion Association), along with other Fashion Shows around Charlotte, North Carolina,” says Patrick. “I have also participated in a couple of charity Fashion Shows.”

Wherever his Doodled designs are shown, Patrick says the response is overwhelming. “The reactions that I have received from these 3D fashions have been nothing but positive,” he says. “People have been so supportive and full of compliments, some people couldn’t believe that the pieces were created by a pen.”

For Patrick, the 3Doodler allowed him to take his personal creative vision and make it possible, by creating textures and concepts that hadn’t previously existed.

Patrick’s work with the 3Doodler is crucial to his designs and fashion concepts. “I feel that giving your audience the chance to feel your designs whether it’s being seen in a photo or on a runway is important.”

The Doodle is in the Detail with Grace Du Prez

“I’m always drawn to trying new materials and I love creating tactile surfaces,” says Grace Du Prez. A mixed media designer based in London, England, Grace was drawn to the 3Doodler as an experimental new medium.

Grace is no stranger to using unconventional materials in her design pieces. “My previous work has involved lots of surface design techniques including digital embroidery and fabric manipulation,” she explains, “as well as the use of many unusual materials from leather to human hair, and even Mini Cheddars!”

With the wide range of colors available, and having the ability to control the final texture of the plastic, Grace was immediately drawn to the 3Doodler. “It was really interesting to start working with plastic as a medium and exploring all the different effects you can create,” she says.

"It was really interesting to start working with plastic as a medium and exploring all the different effects you can create." Share

Her very first project—a Peacock Hat for Ladies’ Day at Royal Ascot—was certainly a head-turner, and earned her multiple headlines and accolades. “This was the very first time I had used 3Doodler,” Grace says, “so I learnt a lot in a very short amount of time!”

Peacock Hat for Ladies' Day at Royal Ascot

The completed hat took over 60 hours, all Doodled in the span of a week. “There were also a couple of days spent doing the initial designing,” Grace says. “The hat was made up of three different size feathers, all with three colours in them. Each one varied from around 15-30 minutes to make.”

Whether Doodling fanciful hats or fancy jewelry, Grace says it’s not as simple as picking up a 3Doodler and drawing away. “My design process is quite experimental and there is always an element of trial and development,” she explains. “I often start with a mood-board and a brainstorm of ideas.”

Then Grace moves on to drawing out her concepts. “I will draw a few basic sketches of the silhouette and then work out the templates using CAD,” she says. “Designing on the computer works well for me as I can easily make alterations and work out the exact scale. I can also try out different colour options.”

From those plans, Grace then creates a paper model by printing the templates from the computer models. “At this point I can see if it will work logistically,” she says. “For the final part of the planning process, I Doodle a test piece to see how it will look and make adjustments where needed. This step can be repeated several times so that each part works perfectly.”

The results are stunning pieces that reflect her careful planning and meticulous execution.

Sometimes, Grace says, ideas from one project will inspire something completely different. “I’ve just finished a vase that is totally waterproof,” she says. “It’s made of multiple circular layers all joined together—the same principle as a bracelet I previously made.”

After creating the bracelet, Grace says she was inspired by the clear plastic and the circular shapes. “It’s functional and the clear plastic looks really beautiful through the water,” she says. “I applied a layer of clear silicon to the inside surface to make it watertight.”

For Grace, the 3Doodler seems the perfect tool for her artistic and design ideas. “I like that the 3Doodler combines modern technology and yet is still very hands on,” she says. “The making process is integral to me as a designer and I like my work to have a hand made quality.”

And while Grace is now an expert at using the 3Doodler to its highest potential, she says there’s always more to learn. “I’m always getting new ideas for projects,” she says, “and there are still lots of techniques I’d like to try!”

See more of Grace’s work on her website.

Making Patterns with Plastic

Fashion-forward creatives have been finding new and exciting ways to incorporate 3D aspects into their designs. But Hong Kong fashion art house SHIGO went beyond Doodled additions and constructed an entire dress made entirely with the 3Doodler.

SHIGO love to break from traditional thinking and try new things. Led by two young Hong Kong fashion designers, SHIGO is meant to serve as a platform to express creativity and ideas through fashion. “No one has used the 3Doodler to produce clothing made completely from plastic,” say SHIGO’s co-founders, who set out to do what no one had done before—make Doodled clothing a reality.

The duo began with a concept based from seashells. Taking two types of shell patterns, they wove the spiralling designs together to create an intricate design.

With this textile-like pattern, SHIGO then adapted the design to create a lace-like concept for the dress. The pattern was printed and applied to a base layer of heavy paper to test and fine-tune the form and placement before beginning work with the 3Doodler.

Using Blue Steel PLA and Diamonds & Pearls PLA, the final dress had a subtle shimmer which added elegance, sophistication, and enhanced the impressive 3-dimensional nature of the construction.

The final Doodles were peeled away from the paper base, leaving an intricate lace-like shell made of fine strands of surprisingly sturdy plastic.

The dress was left split down one side, with buckle attachments to make it easier to put on and take off.

The end result was something completely new in both the worlds of fashion and 3D printing. With the free-hand nature of the 3Doodler, SHIGO had created the world’s first entirely Doodled dress.

3D Fashion with Amanda Sekulow

When it came time for Amanda Sekulow to create a collection for her graduation from O’More College of Design, she knew exactly what she needed. “Every day I prayed that my 3Doodler would arrive,” she says.

Amanda had backed the 3Doodler Kickstarter, and was anxiously awaiting its arrival. But the clock was ticking. “I began in the autumn of 2013 by creating the concept and illustrating the basic garments,” she says. But she didn’t want to start final creation until she had her 3Doodler in hand. “I was determined to wait, as I wanted to use the 3Doodler in my designs.”

As she waited, the Melt into Spring collection took form as a series of white dresses combined with wearable art. The sophisticated dresses would use a variety of woven materials, with 3-dimensional additions created with the 3Doodler.

And soon the wait was over, and the pen arrived. “It showed up, quite literally, just in time,” Amanda says. “I was able to go back to school in January ready to get down to business!”

She spent the next four months creating, embellishing, and perfecting a total of 10 dresses before her final runway show.

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“There is more than 1,000 feet of ABS plastic in these pieces,” Amanda says, “along with 600 Swarovski crystals, and 810 work hours in total.”

"There are some dresses with intricate sculptures on them, others I let the fabric and plastic do their own thing." Share

While they stand together as a collection, Amanda made sure each dress made a statement on its own. “Each piece is so different, and has its own story to tell,” she says. “There are some dresses with intricate sculptures on them, others I let the fabric and plastic do their own thing. Some of the looks are polished and refined where others look messy and organic.”

And while the entire collection was a labor of love, Amanda says one piece stands out above the rest.

“My favorite piece was the finale piece in the show,” she admits. The dress in question has a high neckline with a chest and shoulder piece with attached apron made entirely from Doodled ABS. With 85 Doodled flowers and 119 attached crystals, this dress alone took over 100 hours to complete.

“I made the neck piece and bodice portion of the apron directly on a body form, so that it would fit close to the model’s body,” Amanda says. It was a risk, as the fit of the final piece would depend on the model who would wear it. “It ended up fitting her perfectly.”

Amanda says watching her final piece during the show was her proudest moment. “I have never been more excited to see anything walk down a runway,” she says, “and everyone else seemed to love it just as much as I do.”

Amanda says the final result of Melt into Spring is a culmination of all the work she has put into design and fashion. “The entire collection is a reflection of my feelings, motivation and life experiences in the moments when I created them.”

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