Let’s Go Barbie — Make Stylish Accessories!

Barbie is a fashion icon and inspires us all to dream big. Now you can make stylish Barbie accessories with a 3Doodler 3D pen and tutorial!

Over the years, Barbie’s encouraged girls and women worldwide to express their personal style and to be anything they want to be. Barbie held careers in many different industries and represented all kinds of women while breaking fashion barriers.

Now, Barbie is about to hit the big screen in a new adaptation by Greta Gerwig that debuts on Friday, July 21.

It’s the perfect moment to dust off your Barbie dolls and create one-of-a-kind accessories with a 3D pen. Find out how Barbie got her start and explore 3Doodler’s project ideas!

Fashion Icon is Born

  • Close-up of striped doll 3D pen art
  • Barbie with 3D pen suit, hat, and suitcase
  • Stunning 3D pen art: Barbie doll in red dress with gold accents
  • 3D pen art: Barbie doll in red/white dress with black accessories.
  • Barbie and suited man in 3D pen art

Ruth Handler, the co-founder of Mattel, found inspiration watching her daughter, Barbara, and her friends play with paper dolls. She could envision the girls playing with a more lifelike doll but met with resistance at Mattel.

A trip to Europe rekindled the idea after seeing a German doll in a toy shop. Handler quickly created a prototype for an 11.5-inch (29 cm) doll with movable limbs. She named the doll Barbie after her daughter and presented it at the New York Toy Fair in 1959.

From the beginning, fashion played a big part in Barbie’s storyline. Handler envisioned girls playing with the doll to imagine a future where they could be whatever they wanted at a time when many careers were closed to women. Clothes could transform any doll into a flight attendant, doctor, astronaut, or actress. An outfit could create a new look, lifestyle, or career. Anything a teen could dream up was now possible to imagine playing with Barbie.

In the 1970s, Mattel introduced Barbie’s signature pink color to market the doll to young girls. Today the deep pink shade is part of the official Pantone Color Chart designers and artists use.

Make Accessories for Barbie

Whether you’re creating a bright pink accessory or adding to another outfit, one thing is for sure; you can design all sorts of interesting and unique items for Barbie with a 3D pen.
Try your hand at a headband, necklace, or purse with an easy-to-follow tutorial and stencil. Choose a color from a selection of PLA plastic filament, grab your 3Doodler Create+ or 3Doodler Start+ pen, and get crafting.

If you’re feeling really creative, you could even design new clothes for Barbie and Ken. There’s no end to the possibilities.

And, if you’re looking to take the experience one step further, take a Barbie selfie and imagine yourself as part of the Barbie universe!

How has Barbie inspired you? What new accessories will you create? Share your creations with us at @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

Artist Spotlight: Anela Ming-Yue Oh

Anela Ming-Yue Oh is a multidisciplinary artist who loves curry and the ocean! Anela partnered with 3Doodler on our latest guest artist feature to share her approach to 3D artwork.

She uses materials that have a life of their own such as clay, paper, and fiber, with her 3D pen creations. Anela recently completed a year as an artist in residence at the Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts. She will be traveling to Malaysia as a School of Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University Traveling Fellow in 2023.

Finding Artistic Inspiration

Anela relies on her imagination and also draws from the resources around us to inspire her creativity.

“For me, I draw strength to move through the world from my identity as mixed race-Malaysian-Chinese, lessons from the natural world, and people close to me who have passed on,” said Anela.

In this piece, Anela uses the 3Doodler 3D pen to speak to Malaysian batik, a lost wax process where wax is painted or stamped on fabric and then dyed. She also incorporated a plant from both sides of her mixed-race heritage: okra. It’s a plant that Anela believes both her white Southern family members and her Malaysian-Chinese members would have intimately known through food.

“A huge part of using vibrant colors for me is being unapologetic in taking up space,” said Anela. “As an Asian American you are often viewed and shaped by culture to be as small and unobtrusive as possible.”

The bright color in this piece represents reclaiming spaces as an active agent in the world. The colors draw from the traditional Malaysian dress she grew up with and family members who wore such patterns and colors as batik sarongs.

Surprising Ways with Mixed Media

“As an artist who is mixed race dealing with world building I believe it is important that my work reflects a meeting of materials, soft fiber and hard plastic or ceramic meeting in ways that create beautiful complexity,” said Anela. “This interdisciplinary approach reflects the strength and commonalities between the different worlds I inhabit every day.”

She started this project using the 3Doodler Pro+ to draw the central okra stalk element and the other floral patterns. She continues to create until she has enough in varying colors and styles to lay out the design. Next, she begins the papermaking processes to transform the PLA drawings.

“I work with a fiber called overbeaten abaca which is a plant fiber that I beat for 8 hours in a machine called a hollander beater,” said Anela. “I use it because it is extremely strong and connects seamlessly to the 3Doodler drawings.”

She used a papermaking tool called a deckle box to “pull” the sheet using the unpigmented abaca to create the base sheet of paper. Then, she dips each 3D drawing into a pigmented abaca container before placing it on the base sheet. Finally, she removes the abaca base sheet once the 3Doodler designs are placed.


  • Hand holding 3d pen art: green waxed coin
  • Colorful 3D pen string art hanging on wall
  • Vibrant yarn hanging on white wall in 3D pen art (53 characters)

Experimenting & Creating in 3D

During her undergraduate program, Anela used the 3Doodler Pro+ in a metals class and fell in love with the process. The objective was to use the 3D pens to think through modeling before casting. Anela found herself making rings and other jewelry directly with the pen and ABS material.

“I found it very accessible to start working very creatively,” said Anela. “I was building three dimensional forms, flat forms and building them up, and ended up making forms combining those ways of working with the pen that were used in my thesis show.”

She explains that it’s essential to use materials that spark excitement. Trying out new materials encourages the imagination. A new technique may transform an artistic approach.

“I think a huge part of any artistic practice is joy and experimentation,” said Anela. “When you integrate different materials it provides endless problem solving and opportunity to play with how the materials work together.”

Anela advises budding 3D artists to experiment and play. She finds that the more you experiment and add new tools and skills to your toolbelt, the more you will find the things that resonate.

“It took me quite some time to figure out how the 3Doodler Pro+ would function in my larger practice in a meaningful way,” she said. “Now, I’m working with clay in similar ways due to my experience with the 3Doodler pen. I can’t wait to see how all of this learning keeps expanding the relationships between my materials.”

Experiment and play with your 3D pen. Test different materials to see what works best for you. Take inspiration from Anela’s unique approach to art and her tips. Share what inspires you and tell us about it at @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

Make 3D Summer Accessories That Shine

Don’t worry if you missed out on the latest Crocs Collaboration. 3Doodler’s got you covered with custom 3D summer accessories, like clog charms, that you can design with a 3D pen!

Styles come and go quickly these days. That’s why creating custom charms, bike bling, or friendship bracelets could be the ticket to staying one step ahead of the trends and on budget.

Making unique 3D summer accessories or adding custom details with 3Doodler is easy. Check out our tips, and imagine what else you can create!


Table with two 3D pen art baseball hats

Fresh Fruit Clog Charms

Summer is right around the corner, so it’s the perfect time to create DIY clog shoe charms to celebrate the season. We took inspiration from summer fruits that will soon be available in farmers’ markets and fresh fruit stands. Design a lemon slice, strawberry, watermelon, grapes, or avocado following our tutorial and stencil. There’s no end to the amazing shoe charms that people design. Find more inspiration and create new versions to reflect your style!

Design Clog Charms


Bicycle wheel with chain and star sticker - 3D pen art

Bike Bling

Customize your bike with classic details or vary it up to personalize the look of your ride! Created in the 1980s, spoke beads or spoke dokes, as they are also called, add a bit of nostalgia to any bike wheel. The original beads clip to the spokes of your bike and often make noise as the beads travel up and down the spoke while the wheels are in motion. The faster you ride, the more noise they make. Follow 3Doodler’s tips to make decals you can add to your wheels, handlebars, and more. Check out 3Doodler’s earlier blog on bike accessories for more ideas!

Create Bike Decals



Colorful bead friendship bracelet made with a 3D pen.

Friendship Bracelets

Friendship bracelets are a classic simple craft that never falls out of fashion. If you are a lucky Taylor Swift fan who scored tickets to the Eras Tour, you’ll likely see attendees exchanging bracelets at the show. Learn how to make a friendship bracelet with your 3D pen using our free stencil, or try the more advanced charm bracelet to test your design skills. Find plenty of inspiration at 3Doodler to help get your creative ideas flowing!

Make a Friendship Bracelet

Share your summer accessories with us by tagging @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate!

Dive Under the Sea with a 3D Pen Mermaid

Guest artist Cornelia Kuglmeier helped explore the topic of mermaids this month. Dive into the history of mermaids and learn a few fun facts about their origin.

Disney’s live-action version of The Little Mermaid will be out in theaters later this month. Hear how it inspired Connie and discover the techniques that enabled her to bring her vision to life!

Diving Into an Underwater World

Mermaids and mermen appeared in folklore with the upper body of a human and the tail of a fish. These mythical beings appeared in many different cultures and were considered magical creatures who loved music and often sang.

Early stories about merpeople suggested they brought harm to humans in the form of floods, shipwrecks, or other disasters. However, mermaid and mermen sightings exploded during the early 1500s as explorers took to the seas and made their way across the ocean.

In fact, as early explorers traveled through the Caribbean they claimed they saw mermaids. It was likely manatees that they were spotting in the ocean, but the legends continued.

In 1873, Hans Christian Anderson wrote The Little Mermaid as part of a collection of fairy tales for children. The story shares the journey of a young mermaid willing to exchange her life in the ocean to gain a human soul. Over the years, the tale was adapted to theater, film, ballet, and even opera. The most well-known adaptation is that of the animated Disney film that was released in 1989.

“I loved the character of Ariel. She’s such a curious, lively girl, who loves to explore, to learn new things, and expand her horizon,” said Connie. “What intrigued me the most, though, was that beautiful underwater world. It was a completely new world to me, as was ours to Ariel.”


  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler
  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler
  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler
  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler
  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler

3D Design Process Explained

In sketching this latest project, Connie explains that her drawings continue to evolve throughout the project, and the final design may differ slightly from the original sketch. The next time you sketch, consider using a 3D pen to create a scene or add detail to a particular project.

“Once I start, the ideas start to flow,” said Connie. “As you draw one thing, another crosses your mind, but it doesn’t quite fit with what you’re sketching at the moment. Then, there’s a second idea, and so on.”

She explains that creating is an ever-evolving and living process. Sketching is an essential part of the process. Connie describes it as taking notes and putting them into a picture. That picture quickly becomes a 3D design as the process unfolds.

Connie draws from various angles to help in her three-dimensional planning. This process enables her to firm up the design’s dimensions, proportions, and details.

“The result is often a mixture of different ideas, but seldom just one specific sketch I made previously,” said Connie. “Even though the sketch is important to the design process it doesn’t determine the final result. It mostly serves as a visual note.”


  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler
  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler
  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler
  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler
  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler
  • 3d pen figurine of a mermaid by 3Doodler

Surprising Details & Techniques

Connie admits that creating something truly unique can take time and patience. Some elements, like the scales, were planned, prepared, and applied. But others, like the pearls and bubbles, were added as a finishing touch.

“The result is so rewarding,” she says. “I love the light reflecting on the multi-colored scales. I like the varying hair color. The details breathe life into things.”

A surprising material created the look of the skin on this mermaid. Connie used wood filament to make the skin and body. She doodled the pieces and then used the flattening tip to smooth them and create an even surface.

“Wood is such a good filament for sculpting,” said Connie. “If you use the angled tip, you can carve into the plastic, as I did for lips and eyes. If you want to speed up the process, change the setting from PLA or Wood to ABS. It makes a big difference, but you need to be careful not to press too hard or the plastic will melt away.”

Regarding the new live-action Little Mermaid, Connie is excited to see how Ariel’s sidekicks and the underwater kingdom come to life on screen.

“I’m really interested in all aspects of the story,” says Connie. “I’m mesmerized by modern film technology and enjoy seeing what artists are capable of creating. Entire new worlds to literally dive into!”

Sketch and design in 3D and take inspiration from Connie’s latest tips. Share your 3Doodler projects by tagging @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

Celebrate National Library Week!

We often think of a library as a place to find books of all kinds — from picture books to large print or ebooks and audiobooks. But there’s so much more to the story.

Discover all that libraries have to offer during National Library Week, April 23-29, 2023! Libraries provide a space for community events, guest speakers, crafting classes, STEM activities, and book clubs. In addition, librarians are there to help you find what you need. They lend movies, musical instruments, games, and museum passes. At a library, you might be surprised to find courses that support local businesses, job seekers, or entrepreneurs.

This week, take a moment to explore how libraries support the local community with tips we rounded up. While you’re at it, use your 3Doodler tools to design a flipbook or trace your favorite storybook character. Read on!

There’s More to the Story

It’s easy to participate in National Library Week! Explore these suggestions and discover something new at a library near you.

A few ideas
  • Visit a library: Stop in and visit your local library to explore books or participate in a new activity. Take a moment to talk with your librarian and learn more about your library story. You might be surprised by what you discover!

  • Share #MyLibrary Story: Now that you know more about your library, share what you’ve learned. Was it a new book? Help to start a new activity or craft? A museum pass or a book club? Participate by writing about your library experience and sharing with the hashtag #MyLibraryStory.

  • Build community: Follow the American Library Association on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. There’s so much more to learn when you stay in contact year-round.

Storybook Projects

Libraries are also an excellent resource for STEM/STEAM clubs and maker spaces. In addition, you may find tools you can borrow, like a 3Doodler 3D pen or activity clubs, that you can join for weekly project ideas.

No need to delay. We’ve got a few project ideas that will get you started as you celebrate National Library Week. So enjoy these creative projects you design to support your love of reading, storytelling, and more with 3Doodler!


Purple flower on small card, 3D pen art.

3D Flipbook

Create a small book with a series of images in different positions to create the illusion of movement when the pages flip quickly.

Make It


3D pen art: Green string sculpture in hand.
Bookshelf Doodling

Bring storybook characters to life! Use a favorite book from home or check out new books at a local library. Once you’ve settled on your favorite, we’ll teach you how to take any picture book and create a stencil for doodling!

Try It

Share your library discoveries with us or your new 3Doodler projects by tagging @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

Finding Inspiration Through Street Art, 3D Glasses, and a Mexican Artist

Street art is created in public locations and is usually unsanctioned. Still, it covers a wide range of media and is generally more connected with graphic design than graffiti art, according to Tate.

3Doodler took inspiration from this art form in our latest collaboration with artist Ricardo Martinez. Creating this street art design, Ricardo took inspiration from 3D glasses, engraving, and a late Mexican artist.

3D Glasses & Pop-Culture

Ricardo admits that inspiration for his latest piece initially took a lot of work to find. Although the ideas were there, they took time to coalesce into a design.

“I knew I wanted to create an anaglyph. I kept thinking about 3D glasses that had one red and one blue lens,” said Ricardo. “The images were layers and when you viewed them through the glasses, your perception would change making the image pop off the page or the screen.”

Joseph D’Almeida experimented with anaglyphs, a Greek term meaning again and sculpture, in the 1850s and is often credited with inventing a new way to view 3D. Anaglyph uses a motion or still picture in which two composite images, usually one red and one blue, are superposed one over the other to produce a three-dimensional effect when viewed through correspondingly colored glasses.

The Power of Love, released in 1922, was the first movie to use anaglyph technology and require the audience to wear 3D glasses. It grew in popularity, and more films were released in the 1950s. One of the more well-known films of the time was Creature From The Black Lagoon in 1954.

A more current example of the technique that Ricardo referenced is this Daily Motion video that shows street mural art with two designs in one, depending on how you view it.


3D drawing: Man with bow & arrow

Late Mexican Artist Inspires Modern Design

Despite having chosen his technique, Ricardo struggled to find inspiration for the piece itself. As he attempted different designs, nothing looked quite right. Ricardo wanted to create a transparent image with plexiglass panels. He started with a heart, but the idea refused to take shape.

Ricardo looked for a piece of art or another idea to inspire his design. He decided to focus on a Mexican artist he greatly admired, Saturino Herrán. Born in Aguascalientes, Mexico, on July 9, 1887, Herrán attended the Academy of San Carlos in 1904. His artistic career flourished from 1912-1914, inspiring the Mexican modernist movement.

“I’ve always admired Herran’s figurative art,” said Ricardo. “He is not really well known and I wanted to pay tribute to him using new technology. It felt especially powerful given I’m working with a drawing that is easily 100 years old and reviving it in a modern way.”

The work that inspired Ricardo is an unnamed illustration that Herran drew for Pegaso magazine in 1917. Herrán’s more famous works include Our Ancient Gods, which celebrates the strength, dignity, and beauty of the indigenous people who are part of Mexico’s history. Through this painting and several others, Herrán established himself as a champion of indigenismo, a movement to elevate and show respect for Indigenous people and their culture.


  • Creating 3D art with a 3D pen on paper
  • Grass 3D pen art: Fake animals in vibrant display
  • 3D drawing: Woman with bow
  • 3D pen art: woman picture on wall
  • 3D pen artist sketching by window with knife

Creating Street Art

Now that Ricardo had his idea for the drawing and the technique he would use, he was ready to create. First, Ricardo would trace the sketch and then use his artistic design elements to fill in the back of the portrait.

“What many people don’t realize is that with a 3Doodler 3D pen, you don’t have to be a great artist or designer to create something beautiful,” said Ricardo. “You can find inspiration in drawing or sketches you see and use a DoodlePad to trace them and create art.”

The bright pink and blue palettes he used were classic street art shades. The final design is something that Ricardo is pleased to share.

“When you have an idea, you should see it through to the end. As I was working on this piece, I wasn’t happy with it at all. I even stopped at one point as it just wasn’t making sense,” said Ricardo. “Seeing it through to the end paid off as I was able to realize my initial vision.”

Ricardo’s advice to other artists is to stick with it.

“Even if the skills aren’t there, you can trace. Do whatever you can to produce something and your own style will start to emerge as you put pen to paper,” said Ricardo.

Test Ricardo’s latest techniques and share your 3D art by tagging @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate!

Upcycling for Earth Day!

Explore Earth Month projects and learn inventive techniques to maximize your creativity while keeping your environmental impact low by reusing everyday items.

We’re sharing how creators celebrate the planet by upcycling everyday materials to create impactful art. Turn ordinary objects and things around the house into cool, one-of-a-kind creations with 3Doodler project ideas.

Working for the Environment

The celebration of Earth Day began in April 1970 to push the federal government to tackle environmental issues. The response from the public was overwhelming, and in just a few short months, Congress authorized the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The EPA serves a vital mission to protect human health and the environment. The agency does so by developing and enforcing regulations, giving grants, conducting research, creating partnerships, and educating people about the environment.

In seeking to educate the public, the EPA provides several resources for teachers and students to explore. For example, there are tips on conserving energy at home, becoming a food waste warrior, understanding our connection to groundwater, or even making a disaster readiness plan.

These resources are a fantastic way to bring environmental issues to the forefront and bring about change.

Repurpose & Reuse Everyday Items

3Doodler is committed to inspiring creativity while working with the environment, not against it. Our plastics promise outlines our work to ensure our plastics are completely safe to use. 3Doodler Start+ plastics are biodegradable, and ALL of our plastics are certified as recyclable.

Now that you know the materials you’re using are safe for you and the environment, let’s get doodling. This round-up of projects encourages you to reuse or repurpose things around you as you create in 3D.


Flower pot with flowers - 3D pen art

Give New Life To An Old Planter

Plants and greenery are a natural way to contribute to environmental efforts. Adding them to your home can add a beautiful natural element. Pick up an old pot or vase and give it new life with a 3D design. Add simple flowers along the outside or trim with polka dots, vines, or other creative symbols. It’s a wonderful opportunity to refresh an older item for a new use!

Repurpose a Pot



Table with two 3D pen art baseball hats

Turn Cardboard Scraps Into Speaker

Cardboard is an amazing material to work with to augment your 3D creations. It’s recycling in action. Find a few pieces of cardboard and make a DIY phone speaker that rocks. Use your 3D pen to add details to the speaker in colors that complement your space. It’s a unique way to reuse cardboard and amplify the music on your phone. Time to turn up the volume!

Make a Speaker


Small blue flower on green leaf - 3D pen art

Transform Leftover Plastic

Collect doodled scraps as you create and learn to make new art with a few quick tips. From coasters to bowls and other eye-catching creations, there’s no end to what you can come up with using your plastic scraps. It’s a fantastic way to make the most of all your plastic. Play with different color combinations for your own truly unique recycled creations!

Create Beautiful Decor

Share your creations with us and tell us how you participate in Earth Month by tagging @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate!

Gear Up for Major League Baseball’s Opening Day

Baseball teams are returning to parks across the country, preparing for 2023 Opening Day on Thursday, March 30, 2023.

All 30 teams will play in 15 games which will be the first time since 1968 that every Major League Baseball team starts the season on the same day!

Opening Day will mark the start of the 162-game regular season played over 213 days. So as you’re preparing to root for the home team, grab your 3D pen and doodle a team baseball hat!

America’s National Pastime

The National Baseball Hall of Fame explains that while Abner Doubleday – a decorated Union Army officer who fired the first shot in defense of Fort Sumter at the start of the Civil War and later served at the Battle of Gettysburg – is credited with inventing baseball in 1839 in Cooperstown, NY, there is still debate about the origins of the game.

Regardless of how baseball started, it evolved with the country and became known as America’s national pastime by the last half of the 19th century. Through the years, baseball played a role in the two world wars, civil rights, equal access and opportunity on and off the playing field, and much more, as described in the book Baseball: The National Pastime in the National Archives.

Even if you can’t travel to Cooperstown, you can explore the sport’s rich history through several online exhibits. Check them out and understand more about the players, the uniforms, and critical events in American history!

Swing, batter, batter!

Babe Ruth Batting, courtesy of New York World-Telegram. Babe Ruth Batting, courtesy of New York World-Telegram.

Baseball began as an amateur sport. The first known professional team was the Cincinnati Red Stockings, who played their first game in 1869 as members. The Reds recruited cricket players and developed their skills to become one of the more successful National Association of Base Ball Players (NABBP) teams. As competition heated up, baseball clubs were in a hurry to attract the most valuable players. From there, clubs and teams evolved quickly.

By 1870, the cost of employing professional ballplayers became challenging. As a result, the Cincinnati club’s board elected to refrain from fielding a team for 1871. Instead, many of the players left Cincinnati for Boston. They formed the Boston Red Stockings, who went on to win four straight league championships (1872-1875) before becoming part of the National League. Today the franchise is known as the Atlanta Braves.

The New York Yankees started in 1903 as the New York Highlanders. The Yankees have won 27 World Series titles and 40 American League pennants. However, the team wasn’t always this successful. Their stroke of luck came when they acquired Babe Ruth in 1920 from the Boston Red Sox.

The history of the sport is long and storied. Explore the origins of your hometown team — you might be surprised by what you learn.

Seventh-Inning Stretch

Table with 3D pen art: 2 baseball hats.

Cheer on your favorite team and take a creativity break by making a custom baseball hat. So naturally, with 3Doodler based in New York City, we created a Yankee’s hat and a Mets’ hat using the 3Doodler Start+ and Create+ 3D pens.

With a few simple tips, a 3D pen, plastic, and our free stencil, you’ll be on your way to creating baseball hats for all the MLB fans.

Use your DIY baseball hats as decor for an office or bedroom shelf or perhaps as a cake or cupcake topper. 3Doodler’s tutorial and stencil library is full of fantastic sporty designs from soccer to football or basketball. The choice is yours!

Make a Baseball Hat

Share your thoughts about America’s favorite pastime along with your doodled baseball hat by tagging @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate!

Experiment with Color: Viva Magenta

Creators use colors in unique and exciting ways to draw attention and spark conversation. The Pantone Color Institute announces a color of the year to inspire the design community and open a dialogue about color.

Viva Magenta, the 2023 color of the year, is a dynamic, vibrant hue that exudes joy and optimism. Explore the shade and grab your 3Doodler 3D pen to experiment with a bright, futuristic color palette.


Pantone Pantone

Color of the Year

Pantone began featuring the color of the year in 1999. New colors are announced in early December for the subsequent year. In choosing the color of the year, a group of collaborators and designers take input from various sources, including entertainment, fashion, travel destinations, new technologies, social media, and even sporting events that attract worldwide attention.

In addition, the team considered the public appreciation of nature represented by lifestyle trends, such as bringing natural elements into our homes, at work, and creating vital outdoor spaces. The color choice also reflects a celebratory atmosphere and our renewed enjoyment of traveling, sporting events, and other outdoor activities.

According to Pantone, Viva Magenta’s organic origins hail from the cochineal beetle. The insect produces cochineal extract and carmine. For centuries, the substances colored food, textiles, and even cosmetics.

Viva Magenta is a bright, celebratory color that connects us to nature. Colors like this inspire the imagination and help bring ideas to life. The color of the year typically influences fashion, beauty, interior design, and graphic design.

Spark Bright Ideas

Heart charm bracelet with 3d pen art

Exploring the uses of color and testing new techniques is all part of the design process. This week we’re sharing a gorgeous charm bracelet in bright pink to reflect the color of the year. Make the bracelet and add a selection of charms that reflect your personality.

Charm bracelets have evolved but always stay in style, given their versatility. Test out different colors and make a monochromatic style with all pink, or design the bracelet in one color and charms in other shades to make them pop.

Create one for yourself or gift one to a friend or family member. Follow the tutorial to see how easy it can be to create in 3D!

See the Tutorial

Share your creations with us and tell us how you are experimenting with color in your 3D designs — @3Doodler or tag #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate!

Quick Tips to Support Social-Emotional Learning

A little time goes a long way to make social-emotional learning strategies stick!

Students benefit when they learn to manage their emotions, set and achieve goals, feel and show empathy for others, and create strong relationships.

As adults, we use these skills daily, so it makes sense to give students a chance to test their social-emotional strategies during the school day. And best of all, it’s often more manageable than it seems to incorporate a few social-emotional learning opportunities into a traditional lesson. Best of all, students walk away with more than just a good grade but tips they can use for life.

National SEL Week — March 6-10

The Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) offers comprehensive educational resources and research to support students, teachers, and parents.

CASEL recommends three daily practices that help support students in their SEL growth. The signature practices are very straightforward and include the following:

Three Daily SEL Practices:
  • Welcome Inclusion Activity – Builds community to tackle the word ahead. Examples include whole group meetings, morning circles, and peer-to-peer work.

  • Engaging Strategies – Offering interactive and reflective moments. Examples include partner discussions, private think time, or brain breaks.

  • Optimistic Closure – Highlights a sense of accomplishment and supports forward thinking. Examples include a one-minute accolade or a shared takeaway.


Test out these social and emotional learning tips in recognition of National SEL Week from March 6-10, 2023. The week will culminate with SEL Day on Friday, March 10, to showcase these tools’ powerful impact in uplifting hearts and connecting minds — the theme for this year’s week of activities.

Doodling Activities to Support SEL

It’s easy to see how working in 3D could be leveraged to support CASEL’s three daily practices in unique and creative ways. For example, a class could work together on a large 3D printing project as a welcome activity, or students could create individual items to share with a larger group in a morning circle activity. Doodling also provides a fun outlet for students to enjoy while using interactive and reflective moments or even acting as a brain break. Lastly, it’s fantastic to wrap up a lesson, like the ones featured below, with a key takeaway or accomplishment.

This week, explore the following lessons and recognize the value of social and emotional learning!

Grade K-2: Stone Soup

3D pen art: Small chocolate fish on K2 DoodleStoneSoup main.

Stone Soup is a classic children’s story in which a hungry stranger convinces people in a small village to contribute food to make a meal everyone enjoys and serves a moral regarding the value of sharing.

The class will hear the original tale and learn about the value of working together. Then, students will be able to create their own doodled stones using the chosen nouns. Working with a partner, they will create four different story stones. Finally, students will use their story stones as writing prompts, incorporating them into a simple story with a beginning, middle, and end.

Get the Lesson


Grade 3-5: Puppets and Props Story Retelling

Hand holding cat puppet, 3D pen art

In small groups, students will enact a scene from a book with the class. But, with a unique twist, they will create and use doodled finger puppets to share their story with the class. Retelling a story is a fantastic way to build language, speaking, and listening skills. Plus, working together and having an opportunity to design with a 3D pen offers a creative outlet that students will enjoy. The final puppet shows will reflect an understanding of story structure, sequence, and reading comprehension.

Get the Lesson


Grade 6-8: 3Doodler Stop Motion

Close-up of yarn 3D pen toy figure.

Stop-motion animation is a fantastic way to teach students about story structure, think creatively, and work together on communication and teamwork skills. Students will work in pairs or small groups to identify fictional themes in this activity. Next, they will choose a scene representing the theme and doodle their characters and props in 3D. Once ready, they will enact the scene and create a stop-motion animation. The experience will help students build confidence and share their ideas as they work with their peers.

Get the Lesson

National SEL Week is an opportunity to recognize the value of social-emotional learning and find ways to incorporate it into your day. Tell us how your classroom incorporates SEL and tag us @3Doodler #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

March is Youth Art Month

Youth Art Month celebrates the visual arts each March with student exhibitions, public artworks, art festivals, and school events.

Established in 1961 by the Art & Creative Materials Institute (ACMI), the creators sought to emphasize the value children derive from art education. Today Youth Art Month is coordinated nationally by the Council for Art Education (CFAE).

3Doodler is delighted to support the visual arts and inspire young creators to use their imagination and bring their ideas to life. Explore Youth Art Month activities and learn how to engage with 3Doodler’s community to celebrate the visual arts!


New York Youth Art Month Poster New York Youth Art Month Poster

Your Art, Your Voice

This year participants will recognize the month through the theme “Your Art, Your Voice.” In addition, participating states host various activities, from a state flag design contest, local and state Youth Art Month proclamations, and art shows at state capitals and legislative buildings.

The celebration is intended to bring attention to visual art’s value in developing critical thinking skills, raising multicultural awareness, and encouraging technical, communication, and expression skills.

The Texas Art Education Association kicks off Youth Art Month with a Big Art Day, where grades K-12 participate in art events across the state. Big Art Day will take place on March 2, 2023, featuring 1,000 art activities.

In Illinois, students participate in a statewide art show hosted by the Illinois Art Education Association. The submissions are reviewed by a panel of judges who select 45 participants to feature in a statewide slide show that travels across the state.

Visit the Council for Art Education to learn more about Youth Art Month events and activities in your state.

Inspiring Young Artists

3Doodler looks to inspire young artists in the classroom and at home through lessons, projects, stencils, tutorials, and more. All these resources are readily available in the 3Doodler resource library and the 3Doodler App.

The 3Doodler App is a great way to encourage budding artists to expand their ability to draw and create in 3D. Through the app, young artists will find stencils, tutorials, and other art prompts to jumpstart their creativity. Plus, they can share their latest doodle creations with the community via an online gallery. The photos featured are from Doodlers like you. In addition, fellow artists can comment on shared designs and offer support. It’s a fantastic way to build community and celebrate art.

Explore Your Creativity

Get started by creating one of the following projects to celebrate Youth Art Month!

Collage Display

Small 3D pen art - bulletin board with photos and phone.
Create a wall display for some of your favorite artwork. Hang it in your room or a common area in your home to celebrate artistic expression all year!

Get Started


Action Figure

Black bug with yellow and red wings on white surface 3d pen art
Design and personalize your action figure to represent your art and your voice. Use our stencil to start with the basic shape and add details all your own!

Get Started


Keepsake Box

3Doodler creates blue pattern on small wooden ring box
Personalize a box for one-of-a-kind keepsakes, jewelry, or other items you want to keep safe. Follow our pattern using your favorite colors, or create a unique design!

Get Started

We’re excited to see what you create during Youth Art Month. Use our project ideas or create free-hand to share your art in your voice. Share your projects with @3Doodler or tag #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate!

Artist Spotlight: Cornelia Kuglmeier

Cornelia Kuglmeier is an amazing 3D pen artist and educator whose talent and techniques are some of the most creative and unusual.

She’s a highly knowledgeable 3D pen art community member who shares her doodling tips freely. Connie’s design approach turns fantasy into reality. You’ve no doubt seen some of her incredible Doodles on our Instagram. In addition to the content she posts on her Instagram, she’s also shared some incredibly detailed and helpful tutorials on her YouTube channel that explore creative tips and tricks to test out with a 3D pen.

This week we’ve partnered with Connie to reimagine the Pisces symbol from an artist’s perspective. Learn how she designed the piece and explore her 3D pen art tips and tricks!

Finding Creative Freedom

As Connie explains it, designing in 3D offers her artistic freedom. She can create anything she can dream up. And, if she’s working on a project and doesn’t care for something or is struggling to get the exact look she wants, she finds the plastic is easy to heat and remove to remold.

“Creating in 3D gives me infinite freedom. There’s just no limit,” said Connie. “You can draw lines into thin air if you like drawing, you can design pieces flat and assemble them if you’re into modeling and architecture, you can mix techniques, you can bend the plastic pieces with hot air, you can smudge the plastic with your pen’s nozzle, or you can bake and melt it into sheets. The creative possibilities are endless.”

Connie also likes to see where the process takes her. While designing, she never knows what might happen. So she takes every opportunity to try a new idea or test a new technique.

“I look forward to seeing where the experience will take me, and what I’ll discover next,” said Connie. “I love to delve into small things, try not to overlook things, and create pieces that give my audience many things to discover.”

  • 3D dog drawings on two paper pieces
  • Purple flower on paper with 3D fish and man
  • 3Doodler art: Fish, purple/yellow flowers, ruler
  • Colorful fish design created with 3D pen
  • 3D pen art: Paper plate with red and green flower

Pisces Design Inspiration

Connie doesn’t follow zodiac signs closely, but she enjoys reading her horoscope from time to time. She’s an Aries and enjoys reading about the traits related to her sign to see if any match her personality, and some do.

“When I began working on the pisces piece, I looked up the astronomical sign and when I saw it was a fish I immediately had something colorful in mind,” said Connie. “I envisioned a fish with long fins, to show the floating, waving, weightlessness of those animals. I imagined them swimming in the air just like they do under water.”

Connie thought about using a coy or betta fish. When she was younger, she had a betta fish and was already familiar with it. Bettas also have long fins and come in a wide variety of colors. Connie knew she had a winner!

Aspiring Doodlers Take Note

Connie is a phenomenal 3D artist whose techniques and creativity inspire a community of Doodlers. Her suggestions for anyone looking to gain skills with a 3D pen are pretty simple.

“Work with the 3D pen. Seriously, if you browse my Instagram, I posted one of my first creations there, said Connie. “It was a clumsy little birdie, made with the first 3Doodler 3D pen. I was so extremely proud of it that day.”

Connie explains that working with hot plastic and getting a feel for a 3D pen can be daunting. But, the more you work with it, the less afraid you will be about what could go wrong and the more intrigued you become to see what more you can do. She recommends starting small by picking something simple or something you can try to recreate.

“It’s really important to use the 3D pen,” said Connie. “The more you use it, the more comfortable you are with its shape in your hand, the way it functions, the plastic and different filaments. You’ll gradually find the technique that suits you best.”

Once you become comfortable with the pen, Connie recommends trying the nozzle set. She used it for this project to create the fins and scales. Next, she attached the scales by melting them onto the body with the hot pen tip.

“For these fish, I used the angled nozzle to draw those ultra-thin, almost see-through fins, and the shiny scales,” said Connie. “The nozzle set is a great way to spice up your projects, if you find yourself looking for something new!”

As far as what to expect next from Connie, she’s happiest when experimenting and learning something new. In addition, she enjoys creating hyper-realistic pieces, like giant butterflies, and makes a nice piece of fan art now and then.

“Currently, I am working on detailed, monochrome pieces,” said Connie. “I’m mixing plants with animal traits and supersizing small things. My artistic style is always evolving as I learn new things.”

  • Colorful paper flowers on a 3D pen drawing board, fish 7.
  • Red and green fish 3D pen art on white surface

More artist features coming up. We can’t wait to see what you create with all these fantastic tips. Share your creations with us on Instagram or tag #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

Artist Spotlight: Ricardo Martinez

3Doodler is delighted to work with a range of artists this year to invite curiosity and spark the imagination as we design and create in 3D.

Each month, the 3Doodler team shares ideas and tutorials to help kick-start the design process. We were curious to see what our artist community would create with the same inspiration.

Last week, we explored the artistry of ice castles. 3Doodler shared a version that is easy to replicate with our free stencil and tutorial. This week, guest artist Ricardo Martinez (riikc) shared his version of an ice castle. See where he found his inspiration and how the sculpture came together.

Creating with riikc

Ricardo is a sculpture artist, painter, and photographer who explores a variety of materials and techniques in his work. Ricardo has extensive experience creating art with 3D pens and often shares his approach with the 3Doodler community.

Ricardo’s latest installation, Memento Vivere, gained worldwide attention as an interactive multi-disciplinary project using light, technology, and science to express an idea. This larger-than-life exhibit consists of a series of electroluminescent cables arranged in a skull structure that Ricardo designed with a 3D pen. The sectors of the installation light up as people interact with the display.

Ricardo lives in Brussels and travels extensively. He takes inspiration from nature, landscapes, geography, architecture, and much more. We were delighted to connect with him about his experience creating an ice castle in 3D.


  • 3D pen art: Large white castle with clock on top
  • White lace castle sculpture in 3D pen art.
  • 3D pen art: Castle with glass sculpture and bird
  • 3D pen art: Ice and rope sculpture on table - Castle 1

3D Design Approach

Ricardo had an idea for this design and took inspiration from fantasy video games he’s played over the years, like Final Fantasy. From his home in Brussels, he looks at a large church with a castle-like appearance and eight pillars. Mixing these concepts, he began to sketch the design on paper.

“It seems like a different part of your brain kicks in and starts working as you start building,” said Ricardo. “The design evolves as you go. The castle resembles the sketch but evolved as I sculpted it in 3D.”

Ricardo used existing shapes to begin the sculpture and found it easy to keep adding material to get the form he wanted for the design. For example, he used a glass cylinder to create the pillars’ base. He could continue this process to get the length he wanted for the towers.

To design the castle, Ricardo used the 3Doodler PRO+ 3D pen and PLA, nylon, wood, and bronze filament.

“I love the smell of the wood while I’m creating. It makes me feel like I’m in a woodshop,” said Ricardo. “For this design, the wood and bronze add texture and stand in contrast to the rest of the design, which is the effect I was hoping to achieve.”

Advice for the Community

Ricardo is an experienced artist who shares his success tips freely to encourage others to pick up a pen, paintbrush, or other tool and begin creating.

“It’s important to share that you don’t need to create shapes out of thin air,” said Ricardo. “I recommend starting by using existing shapes. Then, you can find inspiration and doodle anything with objects around you.”

For new 3D pen artists, Ricardo recommends starting with a speed setting of three and gradually working up to faster settings. In this design, Ricardo found he could work effectively with a speed setting of seven or nine.

“I was impressed with the speed settings on the pen. It’s incredible how adjusting those settings can change things and make the experience much more enjoyable, given how quickly you can cover a large surface,” said Ricardo. “The PRO+ pen is much more comfortable and easier to use over long periods.”

Ricardo notes that the PRO+ makes it easier to swap materials and see what’s happening, which saves a great deal of time. He was especially pleased with how the wood detail came out on the ice castle and enjoyed adding contrast with different materials.

When working in bronze, Ricardo recommends keeping a bit of distance from the tip to the surface as the material smudges easily.

“Working in 3D evolves whatever idea you think you have, and it goes into many different directions that you can’t experience with just 2D drawing. It opens your mind to new possibilities and thinking in ways you’ve never thought before,” said Ricardo.

It’s incredible to see creators at work and watch designs come to life in 3D. Expect more artist and creator collaborations in the months ahead. Share your ideas with us. What would you like to see 3Doodler and our collaborators create? Tag 3Doodler or use #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

A Winter Wonderland: 3D Ice Castle

Ice sculptures, castles, and palaces are wonderfully artistic and inspire the imagination just as the temperatures begin to drop.

3Doodler took inspiration from the wintry weather and the long history of icy architecture to create a stunning 3D ice castle. See where we found our inspiration and design an ice castle with our latest stencil!

Ice-Inspired Architecture

Ice castles and palaces have popped up in all sorts of cold-weather locations around the world, from Montreal to Switzerland and even St. Paul.

Montreal has a long history of ice castle creations. Before modern technology, people cut ice blocks from the frozen St. Lawrence river. Montreal’s first ice palace was designed for the Winter Carnival of 1884. In addition to the ice palace, the Winter Carnival featured snowshoe races, toboggan slides, and sleigh rides.

Seeking to attract tourists and following Montreals’ lead, organizers in St. Paul, Minnesota, built an ice castle in 1885. In fact, the city has created 37 ice palaces of all different shapes and sizes to date. Today, the ice palaces appear less frequently. In fact, they are often organized to coincide with significant events, like the Super Bowl in 2018. The city of St. Paul features a video explaining how the project came together with a stunning result.

The Jungfraujoch Ice Palace penguin sculptures. The Jungfraujoch Ice Palace penguin sculptures.

In the 1930s, mountain guides in Switzerland carved corridors and hallways with picks and saws in the center of the Jungfraujoch Ice Palace. Today, artists continue to astound visitors with eagles, bears, and penguins carved in ice. Beautiful as it may be, bundle up if you plan to visit. The temperature is a frosty -3 degrees celsius.

Designing an Ice Castle in 3D

The 3Doodler team took inspiration from traditional ice castles created with blocks of ice and more modern interpretations, like the ice palace from Disney’s Frozen. The 3Doodler ice castle stencil offers a series of easily made shapes. You can create a small or large castle by attaching the pieces together.

In the 3Doodler version, we used four large sides, two medium sides, and two small sides. Attaching these shapes together, we created alternating sides for the ice castle. If you wanted to create a larger castle, you could continue to make the side shapes to build out the castle design. Follow the process step-by-step in the ice castle tutorial.

Stay tuned for more ice-inspired designs by a guest artist. The possibilities are endless. Share your designs with us by tagging #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

Honoring the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The civil rights movement was a fight for equality for African Americans under the law in the United States. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led the movement along with other civil rights activists in the 1950s and 1960s.

Revisit the history of the moment and engage students in an important classroom discussion about the work of Dr. King and other civil rights leaders. As you explore historic events, consider creating the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, which was the site of the Selma-Montgomery March in 1965.


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks at the 1955 bus boycott. (National Archives) Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks at the 1955 bus boycott. (National Archives)

Civil Rights Movement

Slavery was abolished at the end of the Civil War, but it didn’t end discrimination against Black people in the United States. The fight for equality would begin in earnest in the mid-20th century and continue for the next two decades.

After reconstruction, the South implemented a series of “Jim Crow” laws to erase gains made after the Civil War. The laws restricted voting rights for African Americans, banned interracial relationships and allowed businesses to separate clientele based on race.

On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white male passenger on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Police arrested Parks, and word of her situation spread quickly, igniting a series of protests. As a result of her act, Parks is known as the “mother of the modern-day civil rights movement.”


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at the March on Washington. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at the March on Washington.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In response to Parks’ arrest, Black community leaders in Alabama formed the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA). Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. led the MIA, a role that put him front and center in the fight for civil rights.

Through King’s leadership, the African American community experienced more progress toward racial equality in 13 years than in the past 350 years. Dr. King took inspiration from his faith and the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi to lead a nonviolent resistance that included protests, grassroots organizing, and civil unrest.

King was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957 to provide organizational leadership to the civil rights movement. In 1963, he led a coalition of groups in nonviolent protest in Birmingham, Alabama. The brutality that ensued by the city’s police force led to national outrage. Later that same year, King led the March on Washington, where he gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech to an audience of a quarter-million people.

King became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 at 35. Also, in 1964, due in part to the March on Washington, Congress passed a landmark Civil Rights Act ending legal racial segregation in the U.S. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act a year later, in 1965, a result of the Selma to Montgomery, AL March for Voting Rights.


The Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. The Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

Relive a Moment in History: Selma to Montgomery

In January 1965, Dr. King led a coalition of activist groups to call for voting rights in Selma, Alabama, where despite repeated attempts, only two percent of Black voters were registered. The campaign saw mass arrests but little violence until February. Then, in Marion, Alabama, state troopers joined local police to break up a march. A state trooper shot a protester who later died from his wounds.

In response to the death, activists set out to march from Selma to Montgomery. While Dr. King was in Atlanta, Hosea Willams and John Lewis led the march. The marchers made their way through Selma across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. A blockade of state troopers and law enforcement officers ordered the marchers to disperse. When they refused, the troopers attacked the crowd with clubs and tear gas. Television coverage of the event, “Bloody Sunday,” as it became known, sparked national outrage.

On March 21-25, 1965, Dr. King participated in a federally sanctioned march from Selma to the steps of the capitol in Montgomery, Alabama. President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 with Dr. King and other civil rights leaders on August 6, 1965.

Make a bridge through history by recreating the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 3D. It’s an opportunity to learn from events of the past and understand the legacy of Dr. King and other civil rights leaders. The 3Doodler tutorial and stencil provides a straight-forward way to recreate this historic bridge.

Share your experience with us and tag @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate on social.

 

Celebrating Creators, Makers, Artists

3Doodler is kicking off 2023 by celebrating our community of creators, makers, and artists. Over the years, a highlight of our work is to share 3D printing ideas and art that comes directly from you.

As we head into a new year, 3Doodler will look to collaborate with artists, educators, and entrepreneurs to explore ways we elevate creativity. But, of course, it’s also important to inspire new creators. With that in mind, we’ll share accessible stencils, tutorials, and more to support budding artists.

Let’s take a quick look back to revisit the projects and artists who inspired you the most. Plus, we’ll share a quick project to jump-start creativity in 2023.

"I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn’t say any other way – things I had no words for."-Georgia O'Keeffe Share

Dina Velikovskaya

Two men standing by tree with rope - creative 3D pen drawing.
Dina is an animation artist and director who produced “Ties,” an animated short film that debuted in 2019. The film, released to the public in 2022, explores the connection between parents and their children. A young woman leaves home to see the world. Her parents are left behind, and their world changes without her.

Dina also shared a behind-the-scenes look at creating the film using a 3D pen. First, all the characters were created using a 2d digital drawn animation technique and then outlined with a 3D pen. The result was sets of flat plastic figures. Next, the director filmed the figures frame by frame in a stop-motion set, along with wire objects.

Rick Martinez

Man sculpting human head with 3D pen art
Rick works in sculpture, painting, and photography and frequently shares his insights on working in 3D. Rick’s latest installation, titled “Memento Vivere,” gained worldwide attention as an interactive multi-disciplinary project that uses light, technology, and science to express an idea. This larger-than-life exhibit consists of a series of electroluminescent cables arranged in a skull structure that Rick designed with a 3D pen. The sectors of the installation light up as people interact with the display.

Rick continues to push the boundaries of art and technology with his creative use of materials. Keep an eye out for a 3Doodler collaboration with Rick later this month!

Cornelia Kuglmeier

3D pen art: Snowflake, dragonfly, and flower on white surface

Connie is a 3D pen artist who shares her passion for 3D art and tips of the trade freely with the community. She is constantly exploring new creative techniques with outstanding results. Her work has been featured often with the 3Doodler community to provide insight and guidance on using a 3D pen to its full potential. For example, we recently shared Connie’s tips for achieving the perfect petal. To see her mastery of 3D application, look no further than a multidimensional snowflake. The use of color, layering, and overall technique are incredible.

See more of Connie’s helpful tips and tutorials on her YouTube channel, where she shares loads of doodling advice.

Edwin Ramirez

Blue sea creature sculpture with fish, 3D pen art

Edwin is a multimedia artist who shares incredible wearable 3D creations. Each is a delicate piece of art, from jewelry to theatrical masks and other accessories. Edwin exhibited at a range of galleries in Kentucky, including recent shows at Kore Gallery (“The Education of Desire” and “Unknowns: Artists you Should Know”), as well as part of the ongoing traveling exhibition “Our Kentucky Home: Hispanic/Latin American art in the Commonwealth” curated by The Kentucky Arts Council. Musicians, models, and entomologists have all worn his designs. It is a delight to see his creations take form in 3D. Be sure to explore more of his work in the year ahead!

Spark Creativity in 2023

Now that you’ve seen a small sample of our vibrant community, we invite you to make this your year of 3D creativity. Get started by creating a custom work of art for home using our go-to phrase. What will you create?

Get the Stencil


Doodling a quote on canvas with a 3D pen art

We want to hear from you. How can we support you in your 3D journey? What tools and tips do you need to kick off a year of creativity? Tell us. Tag #3Doodler.

Gnome for the Holidays

Holiday Gnomes have popped up on everything from napkins and tablecloths to paintings, pillows, and free-standing festive decor. We couldn’t help but ask ourselves how this curious creature became a holiday staple.

Gnomes have been around for ages and feature prominently in many cultures in Northern Europe. So naturally, once we learned more, we had to take a turn at crafting one in 3D!

Scandinavian Folklore

Gnomes trace back to the Nordic regions of Scandinavia, Finland, Iceland, and the Faroe Islands. Folklore suggests that gnomes, elves, and fairies have been part of mythology since the 1400s. Legends about gnomes were shared from the mountains of Switzerland and forests of Germany to the fjords in Norway.

Gnomes were described as mythical creatures who lived underground or as part of the earth. Many tales explained the nature of their magical powers. Given their connection to the land, gnomes positively impacted the natural world and made farms more productive. They worked their magic at night and turned to stone during the day, which explains how they quickly became garden gnomes.

It’s not clear how gnomes have so quickly become part of the winter holiday season, but many believe it’s their resemblance to Santa Claus. Their pointy hats, beards, bellies, and friendly nature encouraged the idea. Plus, gnomes, like elves, have been known to bestow gifts. Whatever the reason, holiday gnomes are here to stay.

The Myth Meets Pop Culture

Gnome sitting on red boat with umbrella - 3D pen art
Gnomes appear in literature, films, board games, and more. More recent depictions of gnomes include movies like “Amelie” (2001), “Gnomeo & Juliet” (2011), “Sherlock Gnomes” (2018) “Gnome Alone” (2018). In these fun flicks, gnomes appear as plot enhancers or as protagonists. In addition, Travelocity’s advertising campaign prominently features a gnome complete with its own Twitter handle.

Following the trend, 3Doodler offered a garden gnome kit that included a canvas gnome shape that creators could doodle on and customize with their choice of colors and textures. The recent popularity of these whimsical winter characters inspired our latest Doodle — a holiday gnome.

All you need to get started is a 3Doodler Start+ 3D printing pen, eco-friendly plastic, a DoodlePad, and the 3Doodler stencil. Follow our tutorial for step-by-step instructions to make this fun holiday gnome. We were tempted to change up the colors, but kept it classic for the holidays. Go ahead and change it up, using different colors for the hat, beard, and legs.


We can’t wait to see what you design. Share your creations with us @3Doodler or use tags #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

The Nutcracker Comes to Life in 3D

The Nutcracker is a timeless holiday fairytale ballet that mesmerizes audiences with beautiful music, an enchanting story, and colorful costumes.

However, the first performances of the Nutcracker were not well-received by audiences and even the composer, Tchaikovsky, found it lacking. Travel back in time and see how this ballet made its way to becoming a holiday classic and bring your own Nutcracker to life with a 3D printing pen and filament.

The original ballet at the Mariinsky Theatre in St Petersburg. Credit: Corbis/Bojan Brecelj The original ballet at the Mariinsky Theatre in St Petersburg. Credit: Corbis/Bojan Brecelj

Book to Ballet: The Nutcracker and the Mouse King

E.T.A Hoffmann is the author of “Nutcracker and the Mouse King,” which was later adapted by the French writer Alexandre Dumas to become the tale as we know it today. Hoffman’s story centered around a little girl, Marie, and her Christmas toys. Marie frets over a beautiful toy nutcracker that broke. As she goes to check on it late one night, she finds the nutcracker has come to life. And, so begins a story within a story of armies of mice and toy soldiers.

Alexandre Dumas made the original version lighter and less scary. Dumas changed Marie’s name to Klara and her visions became sweeter and more childlike. Her family was not as harsh and in all the tale took on a more appealing tone. In 1892, the director of the Russian Imperial Theatre commissioned Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to write a ballet using Dumas’ version. And in so doing, The Nutcracker was born.

The ballet was not a great success at first. Reportedly, audiences were dismayed that the ballerina did not dance until the second act and that so much focus was given to children. Still, Tchaikovsky’s score was captivating and lent itself to new renditions of the ballet.

A Holiday Tradition with Universal Appeal

The performances of the Nutcracker have evolved over time with much to celebrate among audiences young and old. A magical world that comes to life on Christmas with young children, families, toys, snowflakes and candy, all set to Tchaikovsky’s perfect score. The ballet has become a holiday season staple, complete with toy soldiers, a sugar plum fairy, and a snow queen.

As the popularity of the ballet grew, so did the production of nutcrackers to give as gifts and keepsakes. The Steinbach family of Germany is credited with honing the craft of designing and producing wooden nutcrackers of all shapes and sizes. The Steinbachs began as hand-making nutcrackers 200 years ago and all the manufacturing of these figures is still located in Marienberg in the Ore Mountains in Germany. According to German legend, these wooden dolls bring good luck and protection to a family and its home.

3D Nutcracker Takes Shape

There really is no better time to test your 3D skills and craft a nutcracker for the holidays. We’re sharing a new Nutcracker tutorial to guide you through the steps to bring the main character in this magical holiday fairytale to life with your 3D pen.

Get started today with your Create+ 3D Printing Pen, Create+ Plastic, and a paper towel. The techniques in this tutorial could be used to bring other characters from this holiday classic to life too. Share your final design with us @3Doodler #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate!

12 Incredible Doodle Deals

We’re making gift giving easy this holiday season with something for every creator on your list!

Holiday Gift Guides Top Pick

Spread the word, 3Doodler is a top holiday gift on multiple gift guides and toy reviews this year. Our hands-on 3D printing pens offer a unique and accessible way to creators to experience 3D design without any complicated technology.

According to Yahoo Life, 3Doodler is a perfect gift for the budding inventor, artist, or engineer—or, better yet, for a kid with all three interests—this easy-to-use 3D pen lets kids literally “draw” in three dimensions.

12 Incredible Doodle Deals

Doodler elves were hard at work crafting 12 incredible offers that we’ll be unveiling between now and December 14, 2022, to help you deliver smiles as you give the gift of creativity this year. Many of these deals will only last 24 hours so be sure to act fast before it’s too late!

Make the holidays bright and spark imagination with our line of 3D printing pens, accessories, and add on eco-friendly plastic or other material for hours of doodling fun.

Check back often to see the latest offer on our list. We’ll be posting each of them here for easy reference.

Close-up of 3D pen Christmas tree art with presents

Doodle Deal 12: 24-Hour Deal Fiesta

One day only to make the season bright for everyone on your holiday list! During our 24-hour Deal Fiesta all the deals come back for one day only. Find something special for the creators, makers, artists, and designers. There’s something for everyone. Shop Doodle Deals now!

And, remember these deals won’t last so act fast!

Doodle Deal Terms

Each deal is a limited time offer, while supplies last. Doodle Deal #11 starts at 12:00 AM EST on December 14 and expires at 11:59 PM EST on December 14, 2022.


These deals apply to orders placed on 3Doodler store during the deal period. Offers may not be combined with any other coupons, discounts, offers, or promotions.

Turn Classic Sports Into Interactive 3D Games

As the weather cools, take classic games like soccer, football, and basketball to the next level with 3D designs you can enjoy indoors!

Many sports were meant to be played outdoors, but when the rain sets in or courts aren’t available, you can take the fun indoors. Create games with your 3D pen and get a few friends together to test their design skills. This week we’re exploring three classic sports!

Let the Games Begin: American Football

The game we currently refer to as football started as a mashup between soccer and rugby in the United States. The first football game was played as an intercollegiate sport between Rutgers and Princeton on November 6, 1869, in New Jersey. Teams at elite colleges and universities across New England took up the sport in the 1870s.

Walter Camp, known as the “father of American Football,” played halfback and served as the team captain for Yale as an undergraduate from 1876-1881. Camp’s position as captain enabled him to guide the game’s rules for the newly formed Intercollegiate Football Association (IFA). He instituted two significant changes. He did away with an opening “scrummage” and required that a team give up the ball if it failed to move down the field a certain number of yards or “downs” as we know them today. Camp added several other improvements, such as the 11-man team, the quarterback position, the line of scrimmage, and the scoring system.

In 1920, the American Professional Football Association was established, later known as the National Football League (NFL). Football remains one of the most popular sports in the United States.

Try out a tabletop version of the game with friends. It’s much easier to play and a fun way to pass the time. Now, you can create a version to play at home using your 3Doodler 3D printing pen.

Watch the Tutorial



Credit: Wikipedia Commons, Bob Thomas/Popperfoto/Getty, and The New York Times
  • 3D pen art: Black and white photo of Yale Bulldogs Football Team 1881 posing.
  • 3D pen art of 1930 World Cup goalie with crowd watching
  • Man & woman playing with basket in field - 3D pen art

One Game, Many Names: Football or Soccer

Football, or soccer, is the most popular game in the world based on the number of participants and spectators. Given the game’s simplicity, teams form quickly and play on everything from official playing fields (pitches) to gymnasiums, parks, playgrounds, streets, and even at the beach.

Modern football as we know it today traces its roots to Britain. It was there in the 19th century that independent schools took up the sport and attempted to codify the rules. Printed rules were distributed in 1863 by the newly formed Football Association. By 1877, 43 clubs were participating in a cup competition. National leagues in other countries started quickly and created their own cup competitions. In 1904, representatives from seven European countries gathered to establish the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA).

Today, FIFA includes 211 member associations, making it larger than the United Nations. Member associations must accept FIFA’s authority, adhere to its laws, and provide the infrastructure to support the sport. The World Cup, FIFA’s premier month-long tournament, will take place in Qatar, with 32 countries competing from November 20 to December 18, 2022.

While watching the World Cup matches, doodle your own soccer ball. Go with the more traditional black and white, or mix it up with color combinations of your design.

Watch the Tutorial


From Peach Baskets to Global Sport: Basketball

Basketball is the only widely recognized sport with American origins. In the winter of 1891, a classic New England storm was brewing and James Naismith was looking for ways to keep his students busy indoors.

As a 31-year-old graduate student and physical education teacher, Naismith was teaching at International YMCA Training School or Springfield College in Springfield, Massachusetts. He wanted to create a game that could be played indoors with many players and offer plenty of exercise. He approached a school janitor to get two boxes. Instead, he got two peach baskets. Undaunted, he quickly nailed the peach baskets to either side of the gymnasium balcony. The students played on teams attempting to get the ball in the other team’s basket. The first game ended in a brawl, but students were so taken with the new sport that Naismith continued refining the rules.

Fast forward to 1946, when Boston Garden owner Walter Brown saw an opportunity to host basketball games at ice hockey arenas. As a result, Brown established the Basketball Association of America, which would later merge with the National Basketball League to create the National Basketball Association (NBA). Today, the NBA is a global organization with a presence in 215 countries and territories.

Gather friends and craft a basketball in 3D with our easy-to-follow stencil and tips. It’s a fun and creative way to honor the sport and celebrate the history of basketball.

Watch the Tutorial

It’s game time! Create one or all and celebrate sports with 3Doodler. Share your designs with us @3Doodler.

Make the Future in 3D with the 3Doodler Maker Bundle

Must-Have Kit for Creative Kids Who Thrive on Design Challenges With Everything They Need to Design and Build in 3D

3Doodler is delighted to present two new Maker Bundles this holiday season geared toward young inventors looking for creative, easy-to-use arts and crafts tools with a techy twist. These all-in-one kits introduce kids of all ages to 3D printing and hands-on problem-solving.

3Doodler Maker Bundle

  • Cplus Maker box: 3D pens
  • Person holding 3D pen with craft kit box

The 3Doodler Start+ Maker Bundle (ages 6-13) and 3Doodler Create+ Maker Bundle (age 14+) provide hours of hands-on play with new challenges that progress from beginner to experienced designed to spur critical thinking. Once they’ve mastered the challenge cards, kids will go on to create new projects of their own imagination or access 3Doodler’s extensive library of stencils, tutorials, and lessons.

Each Maker Bundle includes the 3Doodler Start+ or Create+ 3D printing pen, tons of refill strands (either Eco-Plastic or PLA), and a set of nine project ideas for hours of inventing.

All New Projects

  • Girl creating green toothbrush 3D pen art at table
  • Brochure with 3D pen art: plant in pot

The 3Doodler Maker Challenge Cards are an ideal way for young creators to gradually increase the level and complexity of their designs. The set of cards features a 3D rhino, a custom woven basket or pencil case, and even a crafty flip book.

Each Challenge Card includes step-by-step instructions and an easy-to-access video tutorial for visual learners. All of the projects are compatible with any 3Doodler 3D pen.

Endless screen-free creation with a push of a button is now in the palm of their hands. Watch their imagination take off with an open-and-go 3D drawing experience like no other. Kids will make the future as they see it with this all-in-one kit!

Holiday Gifting Made Easy

It may be hard to believe, but holiday season is here. While we may not having started searching for the perfect gift for everyone on our list, there is a festive feeling in aisles of most retailers you visit right now and holiday catalogs are hitting mailboxes everywhere. In fact, the Toy Insider named 3Doodler Start+ Maker Bundle a Top Holiday Toy this year and featured the product in its annual holiday gift guide. This is the 17th edition of the holiday gift guide featuring a brand-new selection of fun games, educational toys, and character items. It’s a great place to start your search for the kids on your list!

How To Draw In 3D with a 3D pen

How do you make 3D objects with 3Doodler? The most obvious answer is to Doodle freehand in the air. But don’t stop there – there are also other techniques that you can try out to achieve the same, or even better, results. Who knows, you might even prefer these methods as you climb the learning curve towards becoming a 3D drawing expert!

In this guide to 3D drawing, we look at how you can assemble a three-dimensional object using Doodled 2D parts, a little like building with Lego blocks, as well as making your own molds, and more. Here are some basic techniques:

Build a cube

A great way to practice assembling your Doodles is by building a cube.

  • how to doodle a cube with a 3d pen

    Step 1

    On a piece of paper, draw a 3x3cm square. Doodle to create six two-dimensional square pieces. If you are using a 3Doodler Start Pen, you can use a Start DoodlePad® as a Doodling surface.
  • how to doodle a cube with a 3d pen

    Step 2

    Place the bottom piece flat on your work surface, then hold up a side piece so that it’s propped up against the bottom piece.
  • how to doodle a cube with a 3d pen

    Step 3

    Apply a bit of plastic at the corners where the pieces meet to hold it in place. Then Doodle along the entire joint to secure it.
  • how to doodle a cube with a 3d pen

    Step 4

    Repeat for each side of the cube, and you’re done! Now use the same technique to go beyond 3D cubes to create almost any structure.

Create a sphere

When creating a round shape like a sphere, we recommend using a mold to get that perfect 3D shape. Check out the 3Doodler Start Doodlemolds® Basic Set, make your own sphere mold out of some rolled up paper and masking tape, or use and recycle items you already have at home!

  • how to doodle a sphere with a 3d pen

    Step 1

    Get started by using your ping pong ball as your 3D mold and wrapping it with masking tape. Doodle a line around the middle of the ball, and work your way toward one end to create a semi-sphere.

    TIP: If you don’t have a ping pong ball, you can also use the balloon technique from this fairy lights tutorial instead.

  • how to doodle a sphere with a 3d pen

    Step 2

    Leaving a little space, Doodle another semi-sphere on the other side of the ping pong ball.
  • how to doodle a sphere with a 3d pen

    Step 3

    Use a nail file or small pair of scissors to slide around the inside of your semi-spheres and pop them off your ping-pong ball. They should come off easily once they’re a little loose!

    CAUTION: Adults should help children with this step!

  • how to doodle a sphere with a 3d pen

    Step 4

    Add some plastic to join the two semi-spheres together to form a whole sphere!

    Almost any object can be used to make a 3D mold for your creations. Try picking up a random household object and using it as a starting point for your next 3D masterpiece.

Make a figurine or animal

When making more complex structures like a figurine or animal, you can build your own molds with paper, masking tape, and a few household items.

  • how to doodle a figurine with a 3d pen

    Step 1

    Sketch out your character and draw simplified shapes onto each body part (e.g: a circle for the head, cylinders for legs, a rectangular prism for the body). Write down the rough measurements for each of these shapes.
  • how to doodle a figurine with a 3d pen

    Step 2

    Find objects that match these basic shapes (e.g. pencils or rolls of paper for legs, a ping pong ball for the head, a glass bottle for the body). If you can’t find the right objects, scrunch up some waste paper into the desired shape. Be sure to wrap each of your molds with masking tape before Doodling onto the surface.

    TIP: A 3Doodler Create pen can melt other plastics, so use surfaces like paper, glass, clay and wood to be safe. Always wrap them with masking tape to ensure easy removal of your finished Doodle. And you can also sketch out your Doodling onto the tape itself.

  • how to doodle a figurine with a 3d pen

    Step 3

    Doodle half of each shape and pop off the solidified plastic before Doodling the second half. Then join the two halves together using your 3Doodler to create each completed body part.

    TIP: If you are using scrunched up paper or other expendable material as a mold, you may want to completely cover the mold and leave the paper inside of your Doodle.

  • how to doodle a figurine with a 3d pen

    Step 4

    Assemble all body parts by Doodling them together. You can Doodle flat parts and attach them or simply add the basic shape to create protruding parts like ears and toes.
  • how to doodle a figurine with a 3d pen

    Step 5

    Add details like facial features directly onto your piece and play with textures for fur or hair. You can also use nozzle tips for fine details and finishing touches.

    TIP: Use the smoothing tool tip to scrape off mistakes and redoodle parts.

  • Step 6

    All done! Don’t forget to show off your Doodle by tagging #whatwillyoucreate!

An even more advanced way to make the base structure is to use ABS plastic to create a frame. With the frame built out, you can Doodle over it using either PLA or ABS to complete the shape. For example, to make the shape of legs, simply Doodle rings of incremental sizes, then join the pieces together. Finally, fill up the gaps by connecting the rings. See how 3D pen artist Heather Baharally creates her frames with the 3Doodler Start Pen to create a beautiful, realistic octopus.

Ready to create more? You’re going to love these tutorials and stencils that we’ve prepared for you.
To purchase 3Doodler products, visit our store here.

Close-up: 3D pen art cake with sticks design

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