Artist Spotlight: Ricardo Martinez

3Doodler is delighted to work with a range of artists this year to invite curiosity and spark the imagination as we design and create in 3D.

Each month, the 3Doodler team shares ideas and tutorials to help kick-start the design process. We were curious to see what our artist community would create with the same inspiration.

Last week, we explored the artistry of ice castles. 3Doodler shared a version that is easy to replicate with our free stencil and tutorial. This week, guest artist Ricardo Martinez (riikc) shared his version of an ice castle. See where he found his inspiration and how the sculpture came together.

Creating with riikc

Ricardo is a sculpture artist, painter, and photographer who explores a variety of materials and techniques in his work. Ricardo has extensive experience creating art with 3D pens and often shares his approach with the 3Doodler community.

Ricardo’s latest installation, Memento Vivere, gained worldwide attention as an interactive multi-disciplinary project using light, technology, and science to express an idea. This larger-than-life exhibit consists of a series of electroluminescent cables arranged in a skull structure that Ricardo designed with a 3D pen. The sectors of the installation light up as people interact with the display.

Ricardo lives in Brussels and travels extensively. He takes inspiration from nature, landscapes, geography, architecture, and much more. We were delighted to connect with him about his experience creating an ice castle in 3D.



3D Design Approach

Ricardo had an idea for this design and took inspiration from fantasy video games he’s played over the years, like Final Fantasy. From his home in Brussels, he looks at a large church with a castle-like appearance and eight pillars. Mixing these concepts, he began to sketch the design on paper.

“It seems like a different part of your brain kicks in and starts working as you start building,” said Ricardo. “The design evolves as you go. The castle resembles the sketch but evolved as I sculpted it in 3D.”

Ricardo used existing shapes to begin the sculpture and found it easy to keep adding material to get the form he wanted for the design. For example, he used a glass cylinder to create the pillars’ base. He could continue this process to get the length he wanted for the towers.

To design the castle, Ricardo used the 3Doodler PRO+ 3D pen and PLA, nylon, wood, and bronze filament.

“I love the smell of the wood while I’m creating. It makes me feel like I’m in a woodshop,” said Ricardo. “For this design, the wood and bronze add texture and stand in contrast to the rest of the design, which is the effect I was hoping to achieve.”

Advice for the Community

Ricardo is an experienced artist who shares his success tips freely to encourage others to pick up a pen, paintbrush, or other tool and begin creating.

“It’s important to share that you don’t need to create shapes out of thin air,” said Ricardo. “I recommend starting by using existing shapes. Then, you can find inspiration and doodle anything with objects around you.”

For new 3D pen artists, Ricardo recommends starting with a speed setting of three and gradually working up to faster settings. In this design, Ricardo found he could work effectively with a speed setting of seven or nine.

“I was impressed with the speed settings on the pen. It’s incredible how adjusting those settings can change things and make the experience much more enjoyable, given how quickly you can cover a large surface,” said Ricardo. “The PRO+ pen is much more comfortable and easier to use over long periods.”

Ricardo notes that the PRO+ makes it easier to swap materials and see what’s happening, which saves a great deal of time. He was especially pleased with how the wood detail came out on the ice castle and enjoyed adding contrast with different materials.

When working in bronze, Ricardo recommends keeping a bit of distance from the tip to the surface as the material smudges easily.

“Working in 3D evolves whatever idea you think you have, and it goes into many different directions that you can’t experience with just 2D drawing. It opens your mind to new possibilities and thinking in ways you’ve never thought before,” said Ricardo.

It’s incredible to see creators at work and watch designs come to life in 3D. Expect more artist and creator collaborations in the months ahead. Share your ideas with us. What would you like to see 3Doodler and our collaborators create? Tag 3Doodler or use #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

A Winter Wonderland: 3D Ice Castle

Ice sculptures, castles, and palaces are wonderfully artistic and inspire the imagination just as the temperatures begin to drop.

3Doodler took inspiration from the wintry weather and the long history of icy architecture to create a stunning 3D ice castle. See where we found our inspiration and design an ice castle with our latest stencil!

Ice-Inspired Architecture

Ice castles and palaces have popped up in all sorts of cold-weather locations around the world, from Montreal to Switzerland and even St. Paul.

Montreal has a long history of ice castle creations. Before modern technology, people cut ice blocks from the frozen St. Lawrence river. Montreal’s first ice palace was designed for the Winter Carnival of 1884. In addition to the ice palace, the Winter Carnival featured snowshoe races, toboggan slides, and sleigh rides.

Seeking to attract tourists and following Montreals’ lead, organizers in St. Paul, Minnesota, built an ice castle in 1885. In fact, the city has created 37 ice palaces of all different shapes and sizes to date. Today, the ice palaces appear less frequently. In fact, they are often organized to coincide with significant events, like the Super Bowl in 2018. The city of St. Paul features a video explaining how the project came together with a stunning result.

The Jungfraujoch Ice Palace penguin sculptures.

In the 1930s, mountain guides in Switzerland carved corridors and hallways with picks and saws in the center of the Jungfraujoch Ice Palace. Today, artists continue to astound visitors with eagles, bears, and penguins carved in ice. Beautiful as it may be, bundle up if you plan to visit. The temperature is a frosty -3 degrees celsius.

Designing an Ice Castle in 3D

The 3Doodler team took inspiration from traditional ice castles created with blocks of ice and more modern interpretations, like the ice palace from Disney’s Frozen. The 3Doodler ice castle stencil offers a series of easily made shapes. You can create a small or large castle by attaching the pieces together.

In the 3Doodler version, we used four large sides, two medium sides, and two small sides. Attaching these shapes together, we created alternating sides for the ice castle. If you wanted to create a larger castle, you could continue to make the side shapes to build out the castle design. Follow the process step-by-step in the ice castle tutorial.

Stay tuned for more ice-inspired designs by a guest artist. The possibilities are endless. Share your designs with us by tagging #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

Honoring the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The civil rights movement was a fight for equality for African Americans under the law in the United States. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led the movement along with other civil rights activists in the 1950s and 1960s.

Revisit the history of the moment and engage students in an important classroom discussion about the work of Dr. King and other civil rights leaders. As you explore historic events, consider creating the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, which was the site of the Selma-Montgomery March in 1965.


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks at the 1955 bus boycott. (National Archives)

Civil Rights Movement

Slavery was abolished at the end of the Civil War, but it didn’t end discrimination against Black people in the United States. The fight for equality would begin in earnest in the mid-20th century and continue for the next two decades.

After reconstruction, the South implemented a series of “Jim Crow” laws to erase gains made after the Civil War. The laws restricted voting rights for African Americans, banned interracial relationships and allowed businesses to separate clientele based on race.

On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white male passenger on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Police arrested Parks, and word of her situation spread quickly, igniting a series of protests. As a result of her act, Parks is known as the “mother of the modern-day civil rights movement.”


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at the March on Washington.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In response to Parks’ arrest, Black community leaders in Alabama formed the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA). Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. led the MIA, a role that put him front and center in the fight for civil rights.

Through King’s leadership, the African American community experienced more progress toward racial equality in 13 years than in the past 350 years. Dr. King took inspiration from his faith and the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi to lead a nonviolent resistance that included protests, grassroots organizing, and civil unrest.

King was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957 to provide organizational leadership to the civil rights movement. In 1963, he led a coalition of groups in nonviolent protest in Birmingham, Alabama. The brutality that ensued by the city’s police force led to national outrage. Later that same year, King led the March on Washington, where he gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech to an audience of a quarter-million people.

King became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 at 35. Also, in 1964, due in part to the March on Washington, Congress passed a landmark Civil Rights Act ending legal racial segregation in the U.S. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act a year later, in 1965, a result of the Selma to Montgomery, AL March for Voting Rights.


The Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

Relive a Moment in History: Selma to Montgomery

In January 1965, Dr. King led a coalition of activist groups to call for voting rights in Selma, Alabama, where despite repeated attempts, only two percent of Black voters were registered. The campaign saw mass arrests but little violence until February. Then, in Marion, Alabama, state troopers joined local police to break up a march. A state trooper shot a protester who later died from his wounds.

In response to the death, activists set out to march from Selma to Montgomery. While Dr. King was in Atlanta, Hosea Willams and John Lewis led the march. The marchers made their way through Selma across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. A blockade of state troopers and law enforcement officers ordered the marchers to disperse. When they refused, the troopers attacked the crowd with clubs and tear gas. Television coverage of the event, “Bloody Sunday,” as it became known, sparked national outrage.

On March 21-25, 1965, Dr. King participated in a federally sanctioned march from Selma to the steps of the capitol in Montgomery, Alabama. President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 with Dr. King and other civil rights leaders on August 6, 1965.

Make a bridge through history by recreating the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 3D. It’s an opportunity to learn from events of the past and understand the legacy of Dr. King and other civil rights leaders. The 3Doodler tutorial and stencil provides a straight-forward way to recreate this historic bridge.

Share your experience with us and tag @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate on social.

 

Celebrating Creators, Makers, Artists

3Doodler is kicking off 2023 by celebrating our community of creators, makers, and artists. Over the years, a highlight of our work is to share 3D printing ideas and art that comes directly from you.

As we head into a new year, 3Doodler will look to collaborate with artists, educators, and entrepreneurs to explore ways we elevate creativity. But, of course, it’s also important to inspire new creators. With that in mind, we’ll share accessible stencils, tutorials, and more to support budding artists.

Let’s take a quick look back to revisit the projects and artists who inspired you the most. Plus, we’ll share a quick project to jump-start creativity in 2023.

"I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn’t say any other way – things I had no words for."-Georgia O'Keeffe Share

Dina Velikovskaya

Dina is an animation artist and director who produced “Ties,” an animated short film that debuted in 2019. The film, released to the public in 2022, explores the connection between parents and their children. A young woman leaves home to see the world. Her parents are left behind, and their world changes without her.

Dina also shared a behind-the-scenes look at creating the film using a 3D pen. First, all the characters were created using a 2d digital drawn animation technique and then outlined with a 3D pen. The result was sets of flat plastic figures. Next, the director filmed the figures frame by frame in a stop-motion set, along with wire objects.

Rick Martinez

Rick works in sculpture, painting, and photography and frequently shares his insights on working in 3D. Rick’s latest installation, titled “Memento Vivere,” gained worldwide attention as an interactive multi-disciplinary project that uses light, technology, and science to express an idea. This larger-than-life exhibit consists of a series of electroluminescent cables arranged in a skull structure that Rick designed with a 3D pen. The sectors of the installation light up as people interact with the display.

Rick continues to push the boundaries of art and technology with his creative use of materials. Keep an eye out for a 3Doodler collaboration with Rick later this month!

Cornelia Kuglmeier


Connie is a 3D pen artist who shares her passion for 3D art and tips of the trade freely with the community. She is constantly exploring new creative techniques with outstanding results. Her work has been featured often with the 3Doodler community to provide insight and guidance on using a 3D pen to its full potential. For example, we recently shared Connie’s tips for achieving the perfect petal. To see her mastery of 3D application, look no further than a multidimensional snowflake. The use of color, layering, and overall technique are incredible.

See more of Connie’s helpful tips and tutorials on her YouTube channel, where she shares loads of doodling advice.

Edwin Ramirez


Edwin is a multimedia artist who shares incredible wearable 3D creations. Each is a delicate piece of art, from jewelry to theatrical masks and other accessories. Edwin exhibited at a range of galleries in Kentucky, including recent shows at Kore Gallery (“The Education of Desire” and “Unknowns: Artists you Should Know”), as well as part of the ongoing traveling exhibition “Our Kentucky Home: Hispanic/Latin American art in the Commonwealth” curated by The Kentucky Arts Council. Musicians, models, and entomologists have all worn his designs. It is a delight to see his creations take form in 3D. Be sure to explore more of his work in the year ahead!

Spark Creativity in 2023

Now that you’ve seen a small sample of our vibrant community, we invite you to make this your year of 3D creativity. Get started by creating a custom work of art for home using our go-to phrase. What will you create?

Get the Stencil


We want to hear from you. How can we support you in your 3D journey? What tools and tips do you need to kick off a year of creativity? Tell us. Tag #3Doodler.

New Year’s Eve Party Ideas

Ready to celebrate the start of a new year? We’ve rounded up a bunch of creative ideas to make party planning fun and easy with party props everyone will enjoy.

Gather a group of family or friends to reflect on the year and gear up to make new memories in 2023. It’s always an excellent way to close out one year and start another. Depending on the size of the group, you can make a few fun props to share or customize one for each guest. Ring in the new year in style with 3D creations. Let’s go!

Party Hat


Party hats create a celebratory mood and a festive way to set the scene! Find ways to upcycle party hats with a few creative tips from 3Doodler. Adding a dash of 3D design is a surefire way to make designs pop. Attach it to a headband or use it as a classic party hat. The choice is yours!

Make a Party Hat


Photo Booth Props


Get together and make memories with silly photos and photo booth props. Consider custom colors to match the theme of your party. These classic designs include word bubbles, glasses, a hat, and a tie. Make one or all!

Create Photo Props


Goofy Glasses


The 3Doodler library is full of crafty glasses from retro to classic styles. We chose this pair of party glasses that are sure to spark a conversation. Custom colors will make these shades pop. Inspire friends with your creativity!

Create Glasses


Cupcake Toppers


Dessert is on the menu with fun cake or cupcake toppers featuring New Year’s Eve designs. Balloons, fireworks, champagne flutes, and a champagne bottle are the perfect decoration for tasty cupcakes. These are super simple to make and add a dash of sparkle as you ring in the new year!

Create Glasses



The 3Doodler team wishes our community of creators a happy, healthy, and exciting start to 2023. Share your party designs with us @3Doodler or tag #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate.

 

Gnome for the Holidays

Holiday Gnomes have popped up on everything from napkins and tablecloths to paintings, pillows, and free-standing festive decor. We couldn’t help but ask ourselves how this curious creature became a holiday staple.

Gnomes have been around for ages and feature prominently in many cultures in Northern Europe. So naturally, once we learned more, we had to take a turn at crafting one in 3D!

Scandinavian Folklore

Gnomes trace back to the Nordic regions of Scandinavia, Finland, Iceland, and the Faroe Islands. Folklore suggests that gnomes, elves, and fairies have been part of mythology since the 1400s. Legends about gnomes were shared from the mountains of Switzerland and forests of Germany to the fjords in Norway.

Gnomes were described as mythical creatures who lived underground or as part of the earth. Many tales explained the nature of their magical powers. Given their connection to the land, gnomes positively impacted the natural world and made farms more productive. They worked their magic at night and turned to stone during the day, which explains how they quickly became garden gnomes.

It’s not clear how gnomes have so quickly become part of the winter holiday season, but many believe it’s their resemblance to Santa Claus. Their pointy hats, beards, bellies, and friendly nature encouraged the idea. Plus, gnomes, like elves, have been known to bestow gifts. Whatever the reason, holiday gnomes are here to stay.

The Myth Meets Pop Culture

Gnomes appear in literature, films, board games, and more. More recent depictions of gnomes include movies like “Amelie” (2001), “Gnomeo & Juliet” (2011), “Sherlock Gnomes” (2018) “Gnome Alone” (2018). In these fun flicks, gnomes appear as plot enhancers or as protagonists. In addition, Travelocity’s advertising campaign prominently features a gnome complete with its own Twitter handle.

Following the trend, 3Doodler offered a garden gnome kit that included a canvas gnome shape that creators could doodle on and customize with their choice of colors and textures. The recent popularity of these whimsical winter characters inspired our latest Doodle — a holiday gnome.

All you need to get started is a 3Doodler Start+ 3D printing pen, eco-friendly plastic, a DoodlePad, and the 3Doodler stencil. Follow our tutorial for step-by-step instructions to make this fun holiday gnome. We were tempted to change up the colors, but kept it classic for the holidays. Go ahead and change it up, using different colors for the hat, beard, and legs.


We can’t wait to see what you design. Share your creations with us @3Doodler or use tags #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

The Nutcracker Comes to Life in 3D

The Nutcracker is a timeless holiday fairytale ballet that mesmerizes audiences with beautiful music, an enchanting story, and colorful costumes.

However, the first performances of the Nutcracker were not well-received by audiences and even the composer, Tchaikovsky, found it lacking. Travel back in time and see how this ballet made its way to becoming a holiday classic and bring your own Nutcracker to life with a 3D printing pen and filament.

The original ballet at the Mariinsky Theatre in St Petersburg. Credit: Corbis/Bojan Brecelj

Book to Ballet: The Nutcracker and the Mouse King

E.T.A Hoffmann is the author of “Nutcracker and the Mouse King,” which was later adapted by the French writer Alexandre Dumas to become the tale as we know it today. Hoffman’s story centered around a little girl, Marie, and her Christmas toys. Marie frets over a beautiful toy nutcracker that broke. As she goes to check on it late one night, she finds the nutcracker has come to life. And, so begins a story within a story of armies of mice and toy soldiers.

Alexandre Dumas made the original version lighter and less scary. Dumas changed Marie’s name to Klara and her visions became sweeter and more childlike. Her family was not as harsh and in all the tale took on a more appealing tone. In 1892, the director of the Russian Imperial Theatre commissioned Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to write a ballet using Dumas’ version. And in so doing, The Nutcracker was born.

The ballet was not a great success at first. Reportedly, audiences were dismayed that the ballerina did not dance until the second act and that so much focus was given to children. Still, Tchaikovsky’s score was captivating and lent itself to new renditions of the ballet.

A Holiday Tradition with Universal Appeal

The performances of the Nutcracker have evolved over time with much to celebrate among audiences young and old. A magical world that comes to life on Christmas with young children, families, toys, snowflakes and candy, all set to Tchaikovsky’s perfect score. The ballet has become a holiday season staple, complete with toy soldiers, a sugar plum fairy, and a snow queen.

As the popularity of the ballet grew, so did the production of nutcrackers to give as gifts and keepsakes. The Steinbach family of Germany is credited with honing the craft of designing and producing wooden nutcrackers of all shapes and sizes. The Steinbachs began as hand-making nutcrackers 200 years ago and all the manufacturing of these figures is still located in Marienberg in the Ore Mountains in Germany. According to German legend, these wooden dolls bring good luck and protection to a family and its home.

3D Nutcracker Takes Shape

There really is no better time to test your 3D skills and craft a nutcracker for the holidays. We’re sharing a new Nutcracker tutorial to guide you through the steps to bring the main character in this magical holiday fairytale to life with your 3D pen.

Get started today with your Create+ 3D Printing Pen, Create+ Plastic, and a paper towel. The techniques in this tutorial could be used to bring other characters from this holiday classic to life too. Share your final design with us @3Doodler #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate!

12 Incredible Doodle Deals

We’re making gift giving easy this holiday season with something for every creator on your list!

Holiday Gift Guides Top Pick

Spread the word, 3Doodler is a top holiday gift on multiple gift guides and toy reviews this year. Our hands-on 3D printing pens offer a unique and accessible way to creators to experience 3D design without any complicated technology.

According to Yahoo Life, 3Doodler is a perfect gift for the budding inventor, artist, or engineer—or, better yet, for a kid with all three interests—this easy-to-use 3D pen lets kids literally “draw” in three dimensions.

12 Incredible Doodle Deals

Doodler elves were hard at work crafting 12 incredible offers that we’ll be unveiling between now and December 14, 2022, to help you deliver smiles as you give the gift of creativity this year. Many of these deals will only last 24 hours so be sure to act fast before it’s too late!

Make the holidays bright and spark imagination with our line of 3D printing pens, accessories, and add on eco-friendly plastic or other material for hours of doodling fun.

Check back often to see the latest offer on our list. We’ll be posting each of them here for easy reference.

Doodle Deal 12: 24-Hour Deal Fiesta

One day only to make the season bright for everyone on your holiday list! During our 24-hour Deal Fiesta all the deals come back for one day only. Find something special for the creators, makers, artists, and designers. There’s something for everyone. Shop Doodle Deals now!

And, remember these deals won’t last so act fast!

Doodle Deal Terms

Each deal is a limited time offer, while supplies last. Doodle Deal #11 starts at 12:00 AM EST on December 14 and expires at 11:59 PM EST on December 14, 2022.


These deals apply to orders placed on 3Doodler store during the deal period. Offers may not be combined with any other coupons, discounts, offers, or promotions.

Turn Classic Sports Into Interactive 3D Games

As the weather cools, take classic games like soccer, football, and basketball to the next level with 3D designs you can enjoy indoors!

Many sports were meant to be played outdoors, but when the rain sets in or courts aren’t available, you can take the fun indoors. Create games with your 3D pen and get a few friends together to test their design skills. This week we’re exploring three classic sports!

Let the Games Begin: American Football

The game we currently refer to as football started as a mashup between soccer and rugby in the United States. The first football game was played as an intercollegiate sport between Rutgers and Princeton on November 6, 1869, in New Jersey. Teams at elite colleges and universities across New England took up the sport in the 1870s.

Walter Camp, known as the “father of American Football,” played halfback and served as the team captain for Yale as an undergraduate from 1876-1881. Camp’s position as captain enabled him to guide the game’s rules for the newly formed Intercollegiate Football Association (IFA). He instituted two significant changes. He did away with an opening “scrummage” and required that a team give up the ball if it failed to move down the field a certain number of yards or “downs” as we know them today. Camp added several other improvements, such as the 11-man team, the quarterback position, the line of scrimmage, and the scoring system.

In 1920, the American Professional Football Association was established, later known as the National Football League (NFL). Football remains one of the most popular sports in the United States.

Try out a tabletop version of the game with friends. It’s much easier to play and a fun way to pass the time. Now, you can create a version to play at home using your 3Doodler 3D printing pen.

Watch the Tutorial



Credit: Wikipedia Commons, Bob Thomas/Popperfoto/Getty, and The New York Times

One Game, Many Names: Football or Soccer

Football, or soccer, is the most popular game in the world based on the number of participants and spectators. Given the game’s simplicity, teams form quickly and play on everything from official playing fields (pitches) to gymnasiums, parks, playgrounds, streets, and even at the beach.

Modern football as we know it today traces its roots to Britain. It was there in the 19th century that independent schools took up the sport and attempted to codify the rules. Printed rules were distributed in 1863 by the newly formed Football Association. By 1877, 43 clubs were participating in a cup competition. National leagues in other countries started quickly and created their own cup competitions. In 1904, representatives from seven European countries gathered to establish the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA).

Today, FIFA includes 211 member associations, making it larger than the United Nations. Member associations must accept FIFA’s authority, adhere to its laws, and provide the infrastructure to support the sport. The World Cup, FIFA’s premier month-long tournament, will take place in Qatar, with 32 countries competing from November 20 to December 18, 2022.

While watching the World Cup matches, doodle your own soccer ball. Go with the more traditional black and white, or mix it up with color combinations of your design.

Watch the Tutorial


From Peach Baskets to Global Sport: Basketball

Basketball is the only widely recognized sport with American origins. In the winter of 1891, a classic New England storm was brewing and James Naismith was looking for ways to keep his students busy indoors.

As a 31-year-old graduate student and physical education teacher, Naismith was teaching at International YMCA Training School or Springfield College in Springfield, Massachusetts. He wanted to create a game that could be played indoors with many players and offer plenty of exercise. He approached a school janitor to get two boxes. Instead, he got two peach baskets. Undaunted, he quickly nailed the peach baskets to either side of the gymnasium balcony. The students played on teams attempting to get the ball in the other team’s basket. The first game ended in a brawl, but students were so taken with the new sport that Naismith continued refining the rules.

Fast forward to 1946, when Boston Garden owner Walter Brown saw an opportunity to host basketball games at ice hockey arenas. As a result, Brown established the Basketball Association of America, which would later merge with the National Basketball League to create the National Basketball Association (NBA). Today, the NBA is a global organization with a presence in 215 countries and territories.

Gather friends and craft a basketball in 3D with our easy-to-follow stencil and tips. It’s a fun and creative way to honor the sport and celebrate the history of basketball.

Watch the Tutorial

It’s game time! Create one or all and celebrate sports with 3Doodler. Share your designs with us @3Doodler.

Make the Future in 3D with the 3Doodler Maker Bundle

Must-Have Kit for Creative Kids Who Thrive on Design Challenges With Everything They Need to Design and Build in 3D

3Doodler is delighted to present two new Maker Bundles this holiday season geared toward young inventors looking for creative, easy-to-use arts and crafts tools with a techy twist. These all-in-one kits introduce kids of all ages to 3D printing and hands-on problem-solving.

3Doodler Maker Bundle

The 3Doodler Start+ Maker Bundle (ages 6-13) and 3Doodler Create+ Maker Bundle (age 14+) provide hours of hands-on play with new challenges that progress from beginner to experienced designed to spur critical thinking. Once they’ve mastered the challenge cards, kids will go on to create new projects of their own imagination or access 3Doodler’s extensive library of stencils, tutorials, and lessons.

Each Maker Bundle includes the 3Doodler Start+ or Create+ 3D printing pen, tons of refill strands (either Eco-Plastic or PLA), and a set of nine project ideas for hours of inventing.

All New Projects

The 3Doodler Maker Challenge Cards are an ideal way for young creators to gradually increase the level and complexity of their designs. The set of cards features a 3D rhino, a custom woven basket or pencil case, and even a crafty flip book.

Each Challenge Card includes step-by-step instructions and an easy-to-access video tutorial for visual learners. All of the projects are compatible with any 3Doodler 3D pen.

Endless screen-free creation with a push of a button is now in the palm of their hands. Watch their imagination take off with an open-and-go 3D drawing experience like no other. Kids will make the future as they see it with this all-in-one kit!

Holiday Gifting Made Easy

It may be hard to believe, but holiday season is here. While we may not having started searching for the perfect gift for everyone on our list, there is a festive feeling in aisles of most retailers you visit right now and holiday catalogs are hitting mailboxes everywhere. In fact, the Toy Insider named 3Doodler Start+ Maker Bundle a Top Holiday Toy this year and featured the product in its annual holiday gift guide. This is the 17th edition of the holiday gift guide featuring a brand-new selection of fun games, educational toys, and character items. It’s a great place to start your search for the kids on your list!

The Ins and Outs of the Perfect Doodle

3Doodler’s line of 3D printing pens make it easier than ever to start designing with just a few simple steps, but the real key is learning tips and tricks to use the pen to its full advantage.

It can be challenging to go from a simple idea on paper to creating a 3D shape. We’ve rounded up a few of our favorite tried and true methods for creating in 3D. Design tips for anything you may dream up!


The Perfect Pen Stroke

Whether writing with a traditional pen or a 3D pen there really isn’t a perfect stroke. It’s all about the style that you’re looking to achieve. Strong and bold. Light and airy. With a few simple tweaks you can get just the right finish. In fact, with a 3Doodler 3D printing pen you will want to test out your style. Check the pen speed. The height from the surface you are writing on. And, even the direction you write while using the pen. Take a look and see what a difference it can make to push or pull the pen with this tip as you create in 3D!


Plan Ahead

Rome wasn’t built in a day, and your 3D structure likely won’t be either! It’s important to plan ahead to the extent that you can. The 3Doodler team follows this critical step too with designs like the Brooklyn Bridge, Eiffel Tower, and even a pretzel. Start by drawing what it is you would like to create. Then, see if you can break it down into smaller elements. Having a clear plan or blueprint could be the ticket to success. Check it out!


Finishing Touch

There’s a certain amount of detail in every design that makes it truly unique and eye-catching. Perhaps you ran out of a favorite color filament or need a small amount of color in a few areas. Consider using acrylic paint to make these quick adjustments and create custom details. You’ll be surprised to see how a little paint can go a long way to finishing off your design to great effect. See how you can use paint as a finishing touch.

Patience and Persistence

Professional 3Doodler artists also have their share of quick tips to share with those new to doodling. Their advice often comes down to two things — patience and persistence. Trying different techniques and enjoying the journey is all part of the experience. “Don’t forget you can cut off or meltdown your mistakes,” points out Rachel Goldsmith, a New York and Seattle based artist.

 

Share your own tips with us! @3Doodler #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

Fall into STEM with Lessons for K-8

Boost classroom confidence through a series of STEM lessons that enable students to work in teams and engage in critical thinking skills. Science and math concepts can sometimes be hard to understand. With a unique hands-on approach, students will grasp new ideas in no time!

The 3Doodler lessons span grades K-8 with creative exploration that will have students embracing new ideas. Combine these activities with other resources we’ve rounded up for a completely new approach to tried and true topics.

Grade K-2: Basic Needs of Plants & Animals

To survive, plants and animals have different needs, which we can break down in this hands-on lesson. Students will break into groups and explore the needs of plants and animals using the free worksheet. Working together, they will first trace or draw the symbols for the items listed on the sheet. Then, they will doodle their designs using a 3Doodler Start+ 3D printing pen. Once the symbols are ready, students can use a Venn diagram to compare the needs of the animals with the needs of plants. Students could deepen their understanding by studying the needs of animals from different habitats.

Consider closing this lesson with a video and resources from Plum Landing by PBS to see how plants and animals thrive in a city. This colorful and creative lesson will invite playful exploration of what animals and plants need to survive!

Grade 3-5: Cloud Doodles

With the change of seasons, there’s no better time to observe the science around us. A quick look up at the sky reveals many scientific observations, and for this lesson, we will be looking at different cloud types with a fun twist. By working in small groups, students will be asked to learn about four different types of clouds, study their shape, and research the weather conditions associated with each cloud. Once the research is complete, the students will create cloud doodles and then repurpose them as everyday objects, animals, or people — a poodle, a boat, or car fumes.

Extend learning with a lesson on how clouds affect climate from NASA. Students will appreciate the vital role clouds play in the water cycle and reflect on their understanding. What do you see when you look at the clouds?

Grade 6-8: Bridging the Gap

Bridges have played an essential role throughout history in providing access to routes to transport people and goods. Over time, the design of bridges has evolved from a simple slab to modern structural marvels. In this lesson, students will work in small groups to explore different bridge shapes and their structural elements.

Challenge students to create a bridge that spans 20 centimeters and test its weight-bearing ability with a small car or other materials. Gradually increase the weight to see which group built the strongest bridge. It’s a fantastic way to combine multiple subject areas, from history, architecture, and design to science, math, and engineering. Encourage the teams to reflect on what worked well, what didn’t, and how they could have improved their design.

Consider kicking this lesson off with a bit of history. The oldest surviving bridge in the United States is the Frankford Avenue Bridge in Philadelphia, built in 1867. It played an important role in linking Philadelphia to cities in the north, namely Trenton, New York, and Boston. Speaking of New York, the iconic Brooklyn Bridge was completed in 1883 and was the longest suspension bridge of its time. Much more to learn about the role bridges have played throughout history!

Kick off 2020 with 3Doodler Lessons and Tips from a Teacher

Getting lesson plans in order and planning for your class can be very time consuming, and with coming back after the holiday break there is a lot on your plate.

To help you transition back to school with ease, we have about 100 step-by-step lesson plans available in almost every subject! They are written by teachers, for teachers, and they call out alignment with educational standards such as NGSS, ISTE, CSTA, and Common Core.

Below is a list of some highlighted K-12 lessons that your class can launch the New Year with. We also have tips from Ellen Peterson, Smithfield Middle School’s Technology Resource Teacher, to help you get the most out of 3Doodler lesson plans.

K-2nd Grade

"When they have the opportunity to make models of their own, the learning that takes place is significant! Making models helps my students dive deeper into the content, plus, they usually are having fun while they are doing it."-Ellen Peterson Share
Lasso-Doodler Roundup
Time: Two 45-60 minute sessions
Skill: Beginner
Grades: K to 2nd

In this lesson, students will work with a partner to lasso words together that create contractions. Students will doodle a lasso, use it to isolate words that form contractions and then doodle the contractions to share with the class.

*Session 1 may be used for doodling the lasso.
*Session 2 may be used for lassoing and doodling the contractions.

STEM: Doodle-Parachute-Jumpers (Design Investigation)
Time: Two 45-60 minute sessions
Skill: Beginner
Grades: K to 2nd

In this lesson, students will work in pairs using the 3Doodler to design and create different parachute jumpers, as well as an aerodynamic parachute crafted with everyday objects, e.g., coffee filters and string. Students will make predictions, collaborate, problem-solve, test and retest in this hands-on design project.

MATH: Doodle-Touch-Dots (Addition)
Time: One 30-45 minute sessions
Skill: Beginner
Grades: K to 2nd

In this activity, students will work in pairs to practice adding numbers from 0-9 using touch dots. Students will add touch dots to numbers, and then doodle their own touch dot numbers to create unique addition problems to solve.

3rd-5th Grade

"One thing I recommend to teachers when doing 3Doodler lessons is to build a prototype before asking their students to make one so they can have a reference."-Ellen Peterson Share
STEM: Stars and Constellations
Time: One 45-minutes session
Skill: Intermediate
Grades: 3rd to 5th

In this activity, students will work in pairs to research what causes the apparent brightness of stars and constellations. Students will write a fact-based argument to respond to this question and then create a model of a selected constellation with a 3Doodler and glow in the dark plastic sticks.

Doodle-the-Dots (Multiplication Patterns)
Time: One - 45 minute session
Skill: Intermediate
Grades: 3rd to 5th

In this activity, students will work independently to practice multiplication by connecting-the-dots with a 3Doodler. Students will predict which numbers will result in the same shapes. Students will combine shapes to create an artistic display of their multiplication facts.

6th-8th Grade

"If you are expecting your students to work in groups to share a pen, I recommend clearly defining roles for each group member, or setting time limits for pen use. When using timers in groups, make sure the other group members have something to do while waiting for their turn to Doodle, like drawing their ideas, writing about them, or otherwise."-Ellen Peterson Share
ELA: 3Doodler Stop-Motion
Time: One 45-minute session
Skill: Intermediate
Grades: 6th to 8th

In this activity, students will work in pairs or small groups to identify the theme of a fictional text, summarize a scene that best reflects the theme, and create a 3Doodler stop-motion animation to enact the scene. Creative thinking skills will be integrated into this hands-on project that will help you assess your students' level of comprehension.

STEM: Doodled Animal Prosthetics
Time: One-two 50-minute sessions
Skill: Intermediate
Grades: 6th to 8th

Doodle Doctor, STAT!

In this bioengineering and design activity, students will work in pairs to design and doodle a prototype for an animal prosthesis that meets the constraints of a simulated design problem.

9th-12th Grade

"Once you’ve decided on a specific lesson, make sure you have plenty of extra materials on hand. For new students, they need a certain amount of “playing” before they create a 3D model for a specific assignment. I have my students make a small stick figure statue and I have them practice molding a few parts together before expecting them to produce something assignment-related."-Ellen Peterson Share
The Basic Unit of Life: Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells (STEM)
Time: Two 60-minute sessions
Skill: Advanced
Grades: 9th to 12th

In this activity, students will work in pairs to doodle two cell models, one of a prokaryotic cell, and one of a eukaryotic cell. The students will build all parts in each model such as the nucleus, plasma, cytoplasm, mitochondrion, etc. The student pairs will analyze and record the differences and similarities between the cells.

Doodle-Atoms
Time: Two 45-minute sessions
Skill: Intermediate
Grades: 9th to 12th

In this activity, students will work individually to create a Rutherford model of an atom. Students will also work with a partner who will be responsible for double-checking their work for accuracy as the project is worked on. Their work will be shared with the rest of the class and displayed for other classes to see.

Want to see more free K-12 lessons? Go browse our 3D Pen lesson library.

Other teachers want to see what you’re doing in your learning environment! Share your classroom happenings with them on Twitter, and be sure to follow Ellen Peterson.

Tag Us: @3Doodler, #3Doodler, #3DoodlerEDU

Banner image courtesy of Brittany Ballou .

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