Artist Spotlight: Ricardo Martinez

3Doodler is delighted to work with a range of artists this year to invite curiosity and spark the imagination as we design and create in 3D.

Each month, the 3Doodler team shares ideas and tutorials to help kick-start the design process. We were curious to see what our artist community would create with the same inspiration.

Last week, we explored the artistry of ice castles. 3Doodler shared a version that is easy to replicate with our free stencil and tutorial. This week, guest artist Ricardo Martinez (riikc) shared his version of an ice castle. See where he found his inspiration and how the sculpture came together.

Creating with riikc

Ricardo is a sculpture artist, painter, and photographer who explores a variety of materials and techniques in his work. Ricardo has extensive experience creating art with 3D pens and often shares his approach with the 3Doodler community.

Ricardo’s latest installation, Memento Vivere, gained worldwide attention as an interactive multi-disciplinary project using light, technology, and science to express an idea. This larger-than-life exhibit consists of a series of electroluminescent cables arranged in a skull structure that Ricardo designed with a 3D pen. The sectors of the installation light up as people interact with the display.

Ricardo lives in Brussels and travels extensively. He takes inspiration from nature, landscapes, geography, architecture, and much more. We were delighted to connect with him about his experience creating an ice castle in 3D.



3D Design Approach

Ricardo had an idea for this design and took inspiration from fantasy video games he’s played over the years, like Final Fantasy. From his home in Brussels, he looks at a large church with a castle-like appearance and eight pillars. Mixing these concepts, he began to sketch the design on paper.

“It seems like a different part of your brain kicks in and starts working as you start building,” said Ricardo. “The design evolves as you go. The castle resembles the sketch but evolved as I sculpted it in 3D.”

Ricardo used existing shapes to begin the sculpture and found it easy to keep adding material to get the form he wanted for the design. For example, he used a glass cylinder to create the pillars’ base. He could continue this process to get the length he wanted for the towers.

To design the castle, Ricardo used the 3Doodler PRO+ 3D pen and PLA, nylon, wood, and bronze filament.

“I love the smell of the wood while I’m creating. It makes me feel like I’m in a woodshop,” said Ricardo. “For this design, the wood and bronze add texture and stand in contrast to the rest of the design, which is the effect I was hoping to achieve.”

Advice for the Community

Ricardo is an experienced artist who shares his success tips freely to encourage others to pick up a pen, paintbrush, or other tool and begin creating.

“It’s important to share that you don’t need to create shapes out of thin air,” said Ricardo. “I recommend starting by using existing shapes. Then, you can find inspiration and doodle anything with objects around you.”

For new 3D pen artists, Ricardo recommends starting with a speed setting of three and gradually working up to faster settings. In this design, Ricardo found he could work effectively with a speed setting of seven or nine.

“I was impressed with the speed settings on the pen. It’s incredible how adjusting those settings can change things and make the experience much more enjoyable, given how quickly you can cover a large surface,” said Ricardo. “The PRO+ pen is much more comfortable and easier to use over long periods.”

Ricardo notes that the PRO+ makes it easier to swap materials and see what’s happening, which saves a great deal of time. He was especially pleased with how the wood detail came out on the ice castle and enjoyed adding contrast with different materials.

When working in bronze, Ricardo recommends keeping a bit of distance from the tip to the surface as the material smudges easily.

“Working in 3D evolves whatever idea you think you have, and it goes into many different directions that you can’t experience with just 2D drawing. It opens your mind to new possibilities and thinking in ways you’ve never thought before,” said Ricardo.

It’s incredible to see creators at work and watch designs come to life in 3D. Expect more artist and creator collaborations in the months ahead. Share your ideas with us. What would you like to see 3Doodler and our collaborators create? Tag 3Doodler or use #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

A Winter Wonderland: 3D Ice Castle

Ice sculptures, castles, and palaces are wonderfully artistic and inspire the imagination just as the temperatures begin to drop.

3Doodler took inspiration from the wintry weather and the long history of icy architecture to create a stunning 3D ice castle. See where we found our inspiration and design an ice castle with our latest stencil!

Ice-Inspired Architecture

Ice castles and palaces have popped up in all sorts of cold-weather locations around the world, from Montreal to Switzerland and even St. Paul.

Montreal has a long history of ice castle creations. Before modern technology, people cut ice blocks from the frozen St. Lawrence river. Montreal’s first ice palace was designed for the Winter Carnival of 1884. In addition to the ice palace, the Winter Carnival featured snowshoe races, toboggan slides, and sleigh rides.

Seeking to attract tourists and following Montreals’ lead, organizers in St. Paul, Minnesota, built an ice castle in 1885. In fact, the city has created 37 ice palaces of all different shapes and sizes to date. Today, the ice palaces appear less frequently. In fact, they are often organized to coincide with significant events, like the Super Bowl in 2018. The city of St. Paul features a video explaining how the project came together with a stunning result.

The Jungfraujoch Ice Palace penguin sculptures.

In the 1930s, mountain guides in Switzerland carved corridors and hallways with picks and saws in the center of the Jungfraujoch Ice Palace. Today, artists continue to astound visitors with eagles, bears, and penguins carved in ice. Beautiful as it may be, bundle up if you plan to visit. The temperature is a frosty -3 degrees celsius.

Designing an Ice Castle in 3D

The 3Doodler team took inspiration from traditional ice castles created with blocks of ice and more modern interpretations, like the ice palace from Disney’s Frozen. The 3Doodler ice castle stencil offers a series of easily made shapes. You can create a small or large castle by attaching the pieces together.

In the 3Doodler version, we used four large sides, two medium sides, and two small sides. Attaching these shapes together, we created alternating sides for the ice castle. If you wanted to create a larger castle, you could continue to make the side shapes to build out the castle design. Follow the process step-by-step in the ice castle tutorial.

Stay tuned for more ice-inspired designs by a guest artist. The possibilities are endless. Share your designs with us by tagging #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

Honoring the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The civil rights movement was a fight for equality for African Americans under the law in the United States. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led the movement along with other civil rights activists in the 1950s and 1960s.

Revisit the history of the moment and engage students in an important classroom discussion about the work of Dr. King and other civil rights leaders. As you explore historic events, consider creating the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, which was the site of the Selma-Montgomery March in 1965.


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks at the 1955 bus boycott. (National Archives)

Civil Rights Movement

Slavery was abolished at the end of the Civil War, but it didn’t end discrimination against Black people in the United States. The fight for equality would begin in earnest in the mid-20th century and continue for the next two decades.

After reconstruction, the South implemented a series of “Jim Crow” laws to erase gains made after the Civil War. The laws restricted voting rights for African Americans, banned interracial relationships and allowed businesses to separate clientele based on race.

On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white male passenger on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Police arrested Parks, and word of her situation spread quickly, igniting a series of protests. As a result of her act, Parks is known as the “mother of the modern-day civil rights movement.”


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at the March on Washington.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In response to Parks’ arrest, Black community leaders in Alabama formed the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA). Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. led the MIA, a role that put him front and center in the fight for civil rights.

Through King’s leadership, the African American community experienced more progress toward racial equality in 13 years than in the past 350 years. Dr. King took inspiration from his faith and the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi to lead a nonviolent resistance that included protests, grassroots organizing, and civil unrest.

King was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957 to provide organizational leadership to the civil rights movement. In 1963, he led a coalition of groups in nonviolent protest in Birmingham, Alabama. The brutality that ensued by the city’s police force led to national outrage. Later that same year, King led the March on Washington, where he gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech to an audience of a quarter-million people.

King became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 at 35. Also, in 1964, due in part to the March on Washington, Congress passed a landmark Civil Rights Act ending legal racial segregation in the U.S. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act a year later, in 1965, a result of the Selma to Montgomery, AL March for Voting Rights.


The Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

Relive a Moment in History: Selma to Montgomery

In January 1965, Dr. King led a coalition of activist groups to call for voting rights in Selma, Alabama, where despite repeated attempts, only two percent of Black voters were registered. The campaign saw mass arrests but little violence until February. Then, in Marion, Alabama, state troopers joined local police to break up a march. A state trooper shot a protester who later died from his wounds.

In response to the death, activists set out to march from Selma to Montgomery. While Dr. King was in Atlanta, Hosea Willams and John Lewis led the march. The marchers made their way through Selma across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. A blockade of state troopers and law enforcement officers ordered the marchers to disperse. When they refused, the troopers attacked the crowd with clubs and tear gas. Television coverage of the event, “Bloody Sunday,” as it became known, sparked national outrage.

On March 21-25, 1965, Dr. King participated in a federally sanctioned march from Selma to the steps of the capitol in Montgomery, Alabama. President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965 with Dr. King and other civil rights leaders on August 6, 1965.

Make a bridge through history by recreating the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 3D. It’s an opportunity to learn from events of the past and understand the legacy of Dr. King and other civil rights leaders. The 3Doodler tutorial and stencil provides a straight-forward way to recreate this historic bridge.

Share your experience with us and tag @3Doodler or #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate on social.

 

Celebrating Creators, Makers, Artists

3Doodler is kicking off 2023 by celebrating our community of creators, makers, and artists. Over the years, a highlight of our work is to share 3D printing ideas and art that comes directly from you.

As we head into a new year, 3Doodler will look to collaborate with artists, educators, and entrepreneurs to explore ways we elevate creativity. But, of course, it’s also important to inspire new creators. With that in mind, we’ll share accessible stencils, tutorials, and more to support budding artists.

Let’s take a quick look back to revisit the projects and artists who inspired you the most. Plus, we’ll share a quick project to jump-start creativity in 2023.

"I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn’t say any other way – things I had no words for."-Georgia O'Keeffe Share

Dina Velikovskaya

Dina is an animation artist and director who produced “Ties,” an animated short film that debuted in 2019. The film, released to the public in 2022, explores the connection between parents and their children. A young woman leaves home to see the world. Her parents are left behind, and their world changes without her.

Dina also shared a behind-the-scenes look at creating the film using a 3D pen. First, all the characters were created using a 2d digital drawn animation technique and then outlined with a 3D pen. The result was sets of flat plastic figures. Next, the director filmed the figures frame by frame in a stop-motion set, along with wire objects.

Rick Martinez

Rick works in sculpture, painting, and photography and frequently shares his insights on working in 3D. Rick’s latest installation, titled “Memento Vivere,” gained worldwide attention as an interactive multi-disciplinary project that uses light, technology, and science to express an idea. This larger-than-life exhibit consists of a series of electroluminescent cables arranged in a skull structure that Rick designed with a 3D pen. The sectors of the installation light up as people interact with the display.

Rick continues to push the boundaries of art and technology with his creative use of materials. Keep an eye out for a 3Doodler collaboration with Rick later this month!

Cornelia Kuglmeier


Connie is a 3D pen artist who shares her passion for 3D art and tips of the trade freely with the community. She is constantly exploring new creative techniques with outstanding results. Her work has been featured often with the 3Doodler community to provide insight and guidance on using a 3D pen to its full potential. For example, we recently shared Connie’s tips for achieving the perfect petal. To see her mastery of 3D application, look no further than a multidimensional snowflake. The use of color, layering, and overall technique are incredible.

See more of Connie’s helpful tips and tutorials on her YouTube channel, where she shares loads of doodling advice.

Edwin Ramirez


Edwin is a multimedia artist who shares incredible wearable 3D creations. Each is a delicate piece of art, from jewelry to theatrical masks and other accessories. Edwin exhibited at a range of galleries in Kentucky, including recent shows at Kore Gallery (“The Education of Desire” and “Unknowns: Artists you Should Know”), as well as part of the ongoing traveling exhibition “Our Kentucky Home: Hispanic/Latin American art in the Commonwealth” curated by The Kentucky Arts Council. Musicians, models, and entomologists have all worn his designs. It is a delight to see his creations take form in 3D. Be sure to explore more of his work in the year ahead!

Spark Creativity in 2023

Now that you’ve seen a small sample of our vibrant community, we invite you to make this your year of 3D creativity. Get started by creating a custom work of art for home using our go-to phrase. What will you create?

Get the Stencil


We want to hear from you. How can we support you in your 3D journey? What tools and tips do you need to kick off a year of creativity? Tell us. Tag #3Doodler.

New Year’s Eve Party Ideas

Ready to celebrate the start of a new year? We’ve rounded up a bunch of creative ideas to make party planning fun and easy with party props everyone will enjoy.

Gather a group of family or friends to reflect on the year and gear up to make new memories in 2023. It’s always an excellent way to close out one year and start another. Depending on the size of the group, you can make a few fun props to share or customize one for each guest. Ring in the new year in style with 3D creations. Let’s go!

Party Hat


Party hats create a celebratory mood and a festive way to set the scene! Find ways to upcycle party hats with a few creative tips from 3Doodler. Adding a dash of 3D design is a surefire way to make designs pop. Attach it to a headband or use it as a classic party hat. The choice is yours!

Make a Party Hat


Photo Booth Props


Get together and make memories with silly photos and photo booth props. Consider custom colors to match the theme of your party. These classic designs include word bubbles, glasses, a hat, and a tie. Make one or all!

Create Photo Props


Goofy Glasses


The 3Doodler library is full of crafty glasses from retro to classic styles. We chose this pair of party glasses that are sure to spark a conversation. Custom colors will make these shades pop. Inspire friends with your creativity!

Create Glasses


Cupcake Toppers


Dessert is on the menu with fun cake or cupcake toppers featuring New Year’s Eve designs. Balloons, fireworks, champagne flutes, and a champagne bottle are the perfect decoration for tasty cupcakes. These are super simple to make and add a dash of sparkle as you ring in the new year!

Create Glasses



The 3Doodler team wishes our community of creators a happy, healthy, and exciting start to 2023. Share your party designs with us @3Doodler or tag #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate.

 

Gnome for the Holidays

Holiday Gnomes have popped up on everything from napkins and tablecloths to paintings, pillows, and free-standing festive decor. We couldn’t help but ask ourselves how this curious creature became a holiday staple.

Gnomes have been around for ages and feature prominently in many cultures in Northern Europe. So naturally, once we learned more, we had to take a turn at crafting one in 3D!

Scandinavian Folklore

Gnomes trace back to the Nordic regions of Scandinavia, Finland, Iceland, and the Faroe Islands. Folklore suggests that gnomes, elves, and fairies have been part of mythology since the 1400s. Legends about gnomes were shared from the mountains of Switzerland and forests of Germany to the fjords in Norway.

Gnomes were described as mythical creatures who lived underground or as part of the earth. Many tales explained the nature of their magical powers. Given their connection to the land, gnomes positively impacted the natural world and made farms more productive. They worked their magic at night and turned to stone during the day, which explains how they quickly became garden gnomes.

It’s not clear how gnomes have so quickly become part of the winter holiday season, but many believe it’s their resemblance to Santa Claus. Their pointy hats, beards, bellies, and friendly nature encouraged the idea. Plus, gnomes, like elves, have been known to bestow gifts. Whatever the reason, holiday gnomes are here to stay.

The Myth Meets Pop Culture

Gnomes appear in literature, films, board games, and more. More recent depictions of gnomes include movies like “Amelie” (2001), “Gnomeo & Juliet” (2011), “Sherlock Gnomes” (2018) “Gnome Alone” (2018). In these fun flicks, gnomes appear as plot enhancers or as protagonists. In addition, Travelocity’s advertising campaign prominently features a gnome complete with its own Twitter handle.

Following the trend, 3Doodler offered a garden gnome kit that included a canvas gnome shape that creators could doodle on and customize with their choice of colors and textures. The recent popularity of these whimsical winter characters inspired our latest Doodle — a holiday gnome.

All you need to get started is a 3Doodler Start+ 3D printing pen, eco-friendly plastic, a DoodlePad, and the 3Doodler stencil. Follow our tutorial for step-by-step instructions to make this fun holiday gnome. We were tempted to change up the colors, but kept it classic for the holidays. Go ahead and change it up, using different colors for the hat, beard, and legs.


We can’t wait to see what you design. Share your creations with us @3Doodler or use tags #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

The Nutcracker Comes to Life in 3D

The Nutcracker is a timeless holiday fairytale ballet that mesmerizes audiences with beautiful music, an enchanting story, and colorful costumes.

However, the first performances of the Nutcracker were not well-received by audiences and even the composer, Tchaikovsky, found it lacking. Travel back in time and see how this ballet made its way to becoming a holiday classic and bring your own Nutcracker to life with a 3D printing pen and filament.

The original ballet at the Mariinsky Theatre in St Petersburg. Credit: Corbis/Bojan Brecelj

Book to Ballet: The Nutcracker and the Mouse King

E.T.A Hoffmann is the author of “Nutcracker and the Mouse King,” which was later adapted by the French writer Alexandre Dumas to become the tale as we know it today. Hoffman’s story centered around a little girl, Marie, and her Christmas toys. Marie frets over a beautiful toy nutcracker that broke. As she goes to check on it late one night, she finds the nutcracker has come to life. And, so begins a story within a story of armies of mice and toy soldiers.

Alexandre Dumas made the original version lighter and less scary. Dumas changed Marie’s name to Klara and her visions became sweeter and more childlike. Her family was not as harsh and in all the tale took on a more appealing tone. In 1892, the director of the Russian Imperial Theatre commissioned Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to write a ballet using Dumas’ version. And in so doing, The Nutcracker was born.

The ballet was not a great success at first. Reportedly, audiences were dismayed that the ballerina did not dance until the second act and that so much focus was given to children. Still, Tchaikovsky’s score was captivating and lent itself to new renditions of the ballet.

A Holiday Tradition with Universal Appeal

The performances of the Nutcracker have evolved over time with much to celebrate among audiences young and old. A magical world that comes to life on Christmas with young children, families, toys, snowflakes and candy, all set to Tchaikovsky’s perfect score. The ballet has become a holiday season staple, complete with toy soldiers, a sugar plum fairy, and a snow queen.

As the popularity of the ballet grew, so did the production of nutcrackers to give as gifts and keepsakes. The Steinbach family of Germany is credited with honing the craft of designing and producing wooden nutcrackers of all shapes and sizes. The Steinbachs began as hand-making nutcrackers 200 years ago and all the manufacturing of these figures is still located in Marienberg in the Ore Mountains in Germany. According to German legend, these wooden dolls bring good luck and protection to a family and its home.

3D Nutcracker Takes Shape

There really is no better time to test your 3D skills and craft a nutcracker for the holidays. We’re sharing a new Nutcracker tutorial to guide you through the steps to bring the main character in this magical holiday fairytale to life with your 3D pen.

Get started today with your Create+ 3D Printing Pen, Create+ Plastic, and a paper towel. The techniques in this tutorial could be used to bring other characters from this holiday classic to life too. Share your final design with us @3Doodler #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate!

12 Incredible Doodle Deals

We’re making gift giving easy this holiday season with something for every creator on your list!

Holiday Gift Guides Top Pick

Spread the word, 3Doodler is a top holiday gift on multiple gift guides and toy reviews this year. Our hands-on 3D printing pens offer a unique and accessible way to creators to experience 3D design without any complicated technology.

According to Yahoo Life, 3Doodler is a perfect gift for the budding inventor, artist, or engineer—or, better yet, for a kid with all three interests—this easy-to-use 3D pen lets kids literally “draw” in three dimensions.

12 Incredible Doodle Deals

Doodler elves were hard at work crafting 12 incredible offers that we’ll be unveiling between now and December 14, 2022, to help you deliver smiles as you give the gift of creativity this year. Many of these deals will only last 24 hours so be sure to act fast before it’s too late!

Make the holidays bright and spark imagination with our line of 3D printing pens, accessories, and add on eco-friendly plastic or other material for hours of doodling fun.

Check back often to see the latest offer on our list. We’ll be posting each of them here for easy reference.

Doodle Deal 12: 24-Hour Deal Fiesta

One day only to make the season bright for everyone on your holiday list! During our 24-hour Deal Fiesta all the deals come back for one day only. Find something special for the creators, makers, artists, and designers. There’s something for everyone. Shop Doodle Deals now!

And, remember these deals won’t last so act fast!

Doodle Deal Terms

Each deal is a limited time offer, while supplies last. Doodle Deal #11 starts at 12:00 AM EST on December 14 and expires at 11:59 PM EST on December 14, 2022.


These deals apply to orders placed on 3Doodler store during the deal period. Offers may not be combined with any other coupons, discounts, offers, or promotions.

Turn Classic Sports Into Interactive 3D Games

As the weather cools, take classic games like soccer, football, and basketball to the next level with 3D designs you can enjoy indoors!

Many sports were meant to be played outdoors, but when the rain sets in or courts aren’t available, you can take the fun indoors. Create games with your 3D pen and get a few friends together to test their design skills. This week we’re exploring three classic sports!

Let the Games Begin: American Football

The game we currently refer to as football started as a mashup between soccer and rugby in the United States. The first football game was played as an intercollegiate sport between Rutgers and Princeton on November 6, 1869, in New Jersey. Teams at elite colleges and universities across New England took up the sport in the 1870s.

Walter Camp, known as the “father of American Football,” played halfback and served as the team captain for Yale as an undergraduate from 1876-1881. Camp’s position as captain enabled him to guide the game’s rules for the newly formed Intercollegiate Football Association (IFA). He instituted two significant changes. He did away with an opening “scrummage” and required that a team give up the ball if it failed to move down the field a certain number of yards or “downs” as we know them today. Camp added several other improvements, such as the 11-man team, the quarterback position, the line of scrimmage, and the scoring system.

In 1920, the American Professional Football Association was established, later known as the National Football League (NFL). Football remains one of the most popular sports in the United States.

Try out a tabletop version of the game with friends. It’s much easier to play and a fun way to pass the time. Now, you can create a version to play at home using your 3Doodler 3D printing pen.

Watch the Tutorial



Credit: Wikipedia Commons, Bob Thomas/Popperfoto/Getty, and The New York Times

One Game, Many Names: Football or Soccer

Football, or soccer, is the most popular game in the world based on the number of participants and spectators. Given the game’s simplicity, teams form quickly and play on everything from official playing fields (pitches) to gymnasiums, parks, playgrounds, streets, and even at the beach.

Modern football as we know it today traces its roots to Britain. It was there in the 19th century that independent schools took up the sport and attempted to codify the rules. Printed rules were distributed in 1863 by the newly formed Football Association. By 1877, 43 clubs were participating in a cup competition. National leagues in other countries started quickly and created their own cup competitions. In 1904, representatives from seven European countries gathered to establish the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA).

Today, FIFA includes 211 member associations, making it larger than the United Nations. Member associations must accept FIFA’s authority, adhere to its laws, and provide the infrastructure to support the sport. The World Cup, FIFA’s premier month-long tournament, will take place in Qatar, with 32 countries competing from November 20 to December 18, 2022.

While watching the World Cup matches, doodle your own soccer ball. Go with the more traditional black and white, or mix it up with color combinations of your design.

Watch the Tutorial


From Peach Baskets to Global Sport: Basketball

Basketball is the only widely recognized sport with American origins. In the winter of 1891, a classic New England storm was brewing and James Naismith was looking for ways to keep his students busy indoors.

As a 31-year-old graduate student and physical education teacher, Naismith was teaching at International YMCA Training School or Springfield College in Springfield, Massachusetts. He wanted to create a game that could be played indoors with many players and offer plenty of exercise. He approached a school janitor to get two boxes. Instead, he got two peach baskets. Undaunted, he quickly nailed the peach baskets to either side of the gymnasium balcony. The students played on teams attempting to get the ball in the other team’s basket. The first game ended in a brawl, but students were so taken with the new sport that Naismith continued refining the rules.

Fast forward to 1946, when Boston Garden owner Walter Brown saw an opportunity to host basketball games at ice hockey arenas. As a result, Brown established the Basketball Association of America, which would later merge with the National Basketball League to create the National Basketball Association (NBA). Today, the NBA is a global organization with a presence in 215 countries and territories.

Gather friends and craft a basketball in 3D with our easy-to-follow stencil and tips. It’s a fun and creative way to honor the sport and celebrate the history of basketball.

Watch the Tutorial

It’s game time! Create one or all and celebrate sports with 3Doodler. Share your designs with us @3Doodler.

Make the Future in 3D with the 3Doodler Maker Bundle

Must-Have Kit for Creative Kids Who Thrive on Design Challenges With Everything They Need to Design and Build in 3D

3Doodler is delighted to present two new Maker Bundles this holiday season geared toward young inventors looking for creative, easy-to-use arts and crafts tools with a techy twist. These all-in-one kits introduce kids of all ages to 3D printing and hands-on problem-solving.

3Doodler Maker Bundle

The 3Doodler Start+ Maker Bundle (ages 6-13) and 3Doodler Create+ Maker Bundle (age 14+) provide hours of hands-on play with new challenges that progress from beginner to experienced designed to spur critical thinking. Once they’ve mastered the challenge cards, kids will go on to create new projects of their own imagination or access 3Doodler’s extensive library of stencils, tutorials, and lessons.

Each Maker Bundle includes the 3Doodler Start+ or Create+ 3D printing pen, tons of refill strands (either Eco-Plastic or PLA), and a set of nine project ideas for hours of inventing.

All New Projects

The 3Doodler Maker Challenge Cards are an ideal way for young creators to gradually increase the level and complexity of their designs. The set of cards features a 3D rhino, a custom woven basket or pencil case, and even a crafty flip book.

Each Challenge Card includes step-by-step instructions and an easy-to-access video tutorial for visual learners. All of the projects are compatible with any 3Doodler 3D pen.

Endless screen-free creation with a push of a button is now in the palm of their hands. Watch their imagination take off with an open-and-go 3D drawing experience like no other. Kids will make the future as they see it with this all-in-one kit!

Holiday Gifting Made Easy

It may be hard to believe, but holiday season is here. While we may not having started searching for the perfect gift for everyone on our list, there is a festive feeling in aisles of most retailers you visit right now and holiday catalogs are hitting mailboxes everywhere. In fact, the Toy Insider named 3Doodler Start+ Maker Bundle a Top Holiday Toy this year and featured the product in its annual holiday gift guide. This is the 17th edition of the holiday gift guide featuring a brand-new selection of fun games, educational toys, and character items. It’s a great place to start your search for the kids on your list!

Create Creepy, Crazy, or Cool Monsters with 3Doodler

Explore the history of monsters and design a few scary, hairy, one-eyed creatures with a 3D pen. With Halloween on the horizon, there’s no better time to learn about monsters and create them in 3D using your imagination.

Monsters pre-date written history as stories of them persist across the ages sparking fear, fascination, and even pity. Frankenstein, Dracula werewolves, cyclops, mummies, and zombies have terrified and delighted audiences worldwide for decades. They appear in novels, on television, in movies, and music. In recent times, monsters have been depicted as friendly, misunderstood creatures and invoke a sympathetic response. Cookie Monster, Chewbacca, Shrek, and Monsters Inc. are examples of approach, furry monsters.

With so many examples to choose from, it’s hard to decide where to begin. So follow along to create some ghastly ghouls and purple people eaters!

Early Science Fiction: Frankenstein

In 1818, one of the most well-known monsters debuted in Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus. The story recounts the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who pursues an unorthodox method to bring a creature to life and is later horrified by his creation. The novel is considered the first true science fiction story. It has influenced literature and popular culture considerably, spawning plays, films, and more. Frankenstein, an American Horror movie, was released in 1931 featuring Boris Karloff.

Mainstream Monster Madness

In the 1900s, monster mayhem became mainstream with more approachable characters. The song Monster Mash was released by Bobby “Boris” Pickett and the Crypt Keepers in 1962. It’s become a staple of Halloween culture. Much like the latest TikTok trend, novelty dances were all the rage in the 1960s, and Monster Mash paired well with a popular dance at the time, the Mashed Potato. The song remains a classic. A few years later, in 1964, the Addams Family launched a whole family of bizarre characters in a series of single cartoons created by Charles Addams for The New Yorker.

Friendly Faces Inspire Kindness

Fast forward to the present, and monsters have become more kid-friendly in movies like Monsters Inc. and Hotel Transylvania. These films offer some creative creatures who look a lot less scary and are much more approachable to younger audiences.

The whole Monsters, Inc. crew! Credit: Disney

Monster Making with 3Doodler

Exploring monsters through history, we noticed a few key traits that all monsters seem to share. So as you’re thinking about crafting a monster in 3D, be sure to keep four main character traits top of mind.

Character Traits
  • Physical: What are your monster’s physical traits? Is it big and tall or small and short? Does it have large teeth or sharp claws?

  • Physiological: What scares you? What makes your monster scary?

  • Target: What motivates your monster? What or who is it trying to get?

  • Weakness: Monsters aren’t invincible. What is it that makes your monster disappear? How will you defeat it?


Now, take your ideas and imagine how your monster should look. This free 3Doodler stencil will give you plenty of options to create a monster of your own. The template provides different shapes that you can combine to come up with a scary or silly creature all your own. Review the tutorial to see how to combine the shapes and where to add detail to customize your creation.

Let your imagination run wild as you bring your version of a modern-day monster to life with @3Doodler!

Lessons in Creativity: ELA & Literacy in 3D

Finding new ways to differentiate classroom content to appeal to all learners is a tough task. Adding a dose of creative exploration can help inspire even the most reluctant learners. This set of ELA lessons offer a little something for everyone with a good amount of flexibility to adapt to the needs of each student.

Each of these lessons was curated by our community of teachers who took care to align to content standards. So, while students are busy creating mini masterpieces, you know they are also gaining critical content and learning to apply it through a project-based experience.

Each lesson is set for a grade level span and offers resources to tailor it further. So, are you ready to teach compound-words, character trait development, and even the vocabulary and elements from the periodic table in 3D? Let’s get started!

Grade K-2: Compound Words

Understanding compound words can help build student confidence, improve vocabulary, and expand literacy skills. There are various ways to tackle this topic from worksheets and crosswords to more hands-on fun pairing words together. Take this lesson off the page with a 3Doodler method to explore compound words. First, students work in pairs to form compound words. Each partner will create a stencil to illustrate one of the words in the compound word and doodle it. It’s a creative, memorable way to understand a new concept and increase vocabulary.


Grade 3-5: Developing a Character

Character development is a critical skill to master as students explore short-form narratives and fictional writing. By understanding a character’s actions and emotions, they build comprehension too. Working together, in this lesson, students will create a story character and related characteristics. Next, they will be able to bring their character to life in 3D. Finally, they will write a short narrative based on inferences. Expanding on this experience, the Kennedy Center offers a unique spin that encourages students to dramatize their character for an audience.

Grade 6-8: Elemental Superheroes & Supervillians


Integrate arts, science, and ELA in a unique lesson that will have everyone excited to participate. While this lesson focuses on science by studying the periodic table, it also encourages literacy, language, art skills. Students work together to research and write about an element on the periodic table. Then, using a 3Doodler 3D pen, they will design a superhero or supervillain mask to illustrate the qualities of their periodic element. Add to the intrigue by having each team of students create a riddle to have their peers guess which element the mask represents. Look at comic book characters through the years and see which ones were actually based on periodic table elements!

 

Show us how you bring creativity to the classroom with hands-on ELA lessons and activities tagging @3Doodler #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

  

 

The Ins and Outs of the Perfect Doodle

3Doodler’s line of 3D printing pens make it easier than ever to start designing with just a few simple steps, but the real key is learning tips and tricks to use the pen to its full advantage.

It can be challenging to go from a simple idea on paper to creating a 3D shape. We’ve rounded up a few of our favorite tried and true methods for creating in 3D. Design tips for anything you may dream up!


The Perfect Pen Stroke

Whether writing with a traditional pen or a 3D pen there really isn’t a perfect stroke. It’s all about the style that you’re looking to achieve. Strong and bold. Light and airy. With a few simple tweaks you can get just the right finish. In fact, with a 3Doodler 3D printing pen you will want to test out your style. Check the pen speed. The height from the surface you are writing on. And, even the direction you write while using the pen. Take a look and see what a difference it can make to push or pull the pen with this tip as you create in 3D!


Plan Ahead

Rome wasn’t built in a day, and your 3D structure likely won’t be either! It’s important to plan ahead to the extent that you can. The 3Doodler team follows this critical step too with designs like the Brooklyn Bridge, Eiffel Tower, and even a pretzel. Start by drawing what it is you would like to create. Then, see if you can break it down into smaller elements. Having a clear plan or blueprint could be the ticket to success. Check it out!


Finishing Touch

There’s a certain amount of detail in every design that makes it truly unique and eye-catching. Perhaps you ran out of a favorite color filament or need a small amount of color in a few areas. Consider using acrylic paint to make these quick adjustments and create custom details. You’ll be surprised to see how a little paint can go a long way to finishing off your design to great effect. See how you can use paint as a finishing touch.

Patience and Persistence

Professional 3Doodler artists also have their share of quick tips to share with those new to doodling. Their advice often comes down to two things — patience and persistence. Trying different techniques and enjoying the journey is all part of the experience. “Don’t forget you can cut off or meltdown your mistakes,” points out Rachel Goldsmith, a New York and Seattle based artist.

 

Share your own tips with us! @3Doodler #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

Fall into STEM with Lessons for K-8

Boost classroom confidence through a series of STEM lessons that enable students to work in teams and engage in critical thinking skills. Science and math concepts can sometimes be hard to understand. With a unique hands-on approach, students will grasp new ideas in no time!

The 3Doodler lessons span grades K-8 with creative exploration that will have students embracing new ideas. Combine these activities with other resources we’ve rounded up for a completely new approach to tried and true topics.

Grade K-2: Basic Needs of Plants & Animals

To survive, plants and animals have different needs, which we can break down in this hands-on lesson. Students will break into groups and explore the needs of plants and animals using the free worksheet. Working together, they will first trace or draw the symbols for the items listed on the sheet. Then, they will doodle their designs using a 3Doodler Start+ 3D printing pen. Once the symbols are ready, students can use a Venn diagram to compare the needs of the animals with the needs of plants. Students could deepen their understanding by studying the needs of animals from different habitats.

Consider closing this lesson with a video and resources from Plum Landing by PBS to see how plants and animals thrive in a city. This colorful and creative lesson will invite playful exploration of what animals and plants need to survive!

Grade 3-5: Cloud Doodles

With the change of seasons, there’s no better time to observe the science around us. A quick look up at the sky reveals many scientific observations, and for this lesson, we will be looking at different cloud types with a fun twist. By working in small groups, students will be asked to learn about four different types of clouds, study their shape, and research the weather conditions associated with each cloud. Once the research is complete, the students will create cloud doodles and then repurpose them as everyday objects, animals, or people — a poodle, a boat, or car fumes.

Extend learning with a lesson on how clouds affect climate from NASA. Students will appreciate the vital role clouds play in the water cycle and reflect on their understanding. What do you see when you look at the clouds?

Grade 6-8: Bridging the Gap

Bridges have played an essential role throughout history in providing access to routes to transport people and goods. Over time, the design of bridges has evolved from a simple slab to modern structural marvels. In this lesson, students will work in small groups to explore different bridge shapes and their structural elements.

Challenge students to create a bridge that spans 20 centimeters and test its weight-bearing ability with a small car or other materials. Gradually increase the weight to see which group built the strongest bridge. It’s a fantastic way to combine multiple subject areas, from history, architecture, and design to science, math, and engineering. Encourage the teams to reflect on what worked well, what didn’t, and how they could have improved their design.

Consider kicking this lesson off with a bit of history. The oldest surviving bridge in the United States is the Frankford Avenue Bridge in Philadelphia, built in 1867. It played an important role in linking Philadelphia to cities in the north, namely Trenton, New York, and Boston. Speaking of New York, the iconic Brooklyn Bridge was completed in 1883 and was the longest suspension bridge of its time. Much more to learn about the role bridges have played throughout history!

Inspire the Imagination Through Mexican Folk Art

Alebrijes are fantastical creatures that inspire the imagination.

These colorful animals are a Mexican folk art tradition that combine the features of multiple creatures with bright colors. Celebrate Hispanic Heritage month by learning more about this unique art form and doodle an alebrije with your 3D pen!

The Origin of Alebrijes

Pedro Linares Lopez, a Mexican artist born in Mexico City, began his career making sculptures out of carton or paper-mache and created figurines for Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and other artists from Academia de San Carlos.



At the age of 30, Linares fell ill and dreamed of a strange forest where he saw very bright landscapes and whimsical animals. The creatures he imagined had the features of multiple animals. He saw a mule with butterfly wings, a rooster with antlers, and a lion with the head of an eagle. As he woke from this dreamlike state, he could still hear the animals shouting one word — alebrijes, alebrijes, alebrijes!

It was after this experience that Linares went on to create alebrijes as an art form that is now recognized around the world. In 1990, Linares was honored with the first Mexican National Prize in Arts and Sciences in the category of Popular Art and Traditions.

The Art Form

Linares was a cartonero, or an artist who works with paper, so naturally his knowledge led him to design alebrijes using this method. Cartoneria or papier-mache sculptures were introduced in Mexico during the colonial period to make items for church. The craft developed in the 20th century with artists in Mexico City, namely Linares and Carmen Caballo Sevilla who reinvented the traditional forms and created new ones.

To create a 3D papier-mache sculpture, artists use leftover paper scraps, newspaper, and cardboard from discarded boxes and adhere them using a type of paste. Linares used engrudo, a glue made of wheat flour and water. As the sculpture takes its shape and sets, artists add paste and eventually paint the sculpture with very bright and vibrant colors.


Last year, Pedro Linares Lopez was recognized on what would have been his 115 birthday as a Google Doodle. Emily Barrara, who created the Doodle, shared her process of creating the sculpture. The alebrije art form is also featured prominently in Coco, a Disney Pixar movie about a young boy’s journey to the magical land of his ancestors.

Doodling Alebrijes

As expressive objects, alebrijes are delightful creations to design using a 3D pen. Explore this art form in more detail and create an alebrije that is part fox and part rabbit. Decorating these fun creatures is all up to you. Choose from a range of colors and celebrate the vibrancy of this Mexican folk art tradition.

Doodle a custom alejibre with an easy to follow stencil and tutorial. And the creativity doesn’t have to end here. Once you have the process for creating the shape, expand your thinking and develop a new fantastical alejibre using different animal shapes!

 

Celebrate traditional Mexican Folk Art in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month with @3Doodler #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate.

  

 

Exploring Fabergé Eggs

As we gear up for Easter, rather than working with your class to dye eggs for their baskets, why not encourage them to doodle their own Fabergé eggs?

3Doodled Fabergé

Fabergé eggs have acquired an almost cult-like status in popular culture as symbols of the power and wealth of the Russian Empire. Created between 1885 and 1917, the intricate, jeweled eggs were originally made as Easter presents for the wives and mothers of the Russian aristocracy.

Would you believe that there are likely only 57 Fabergé eggs in existence today?!

A Fabergé egg is a unique and festive gift for students to share with their families. Plus, they can enjoy their designs as Easter decorations for years to come. Since Fabergé eggs are made up of jewels and intricate artwork in real life, creating Fabergé replicas with your 3Doodler pens and plastic is a natural extension of the medium.

Wondering how we created our Fabergé eggs?

We started with a real egg, poked a hole at the bottom to drain the yolk and egg whites. Make sure you do this over a sink or a trash can; it can get pretty messy.

Then we took our 3Doodler 3D printing pen and began Doodling an outline design on the egg’s surface.

Lastly, we created our final look by adding on a few additional accents and unique decorations up and down the egg until we felt it lived up to the name, Fabergé.

For a more in-depth step-by-step process to Doodling your first Fabergé egg, head on over to our tutorial here.

Fresh Spring Deals for Oodles of Doodles

To give you even more festive seasonal Doodles, we’ve curated a couple of limited-time Plastic Bundles for our 3Doodler Create+ and 3Doodler Start pen owners.

Today through Wednesday, April 7, we are offering the following deals that you’ll want to hop on before time runs out!

3Doodler Create+ Plastic Spring Bundle
Enjoy four calming Spring colors for $25, including:
  • Lilac

  • Snow White

  • Pistachio

  • French vanilla

BUY NOW
3Doodler Start Eco-Plastic Spring Bundle
For $25, help your students expand their artistic palettes with lighter shades, including:
  • Pink

  • Lemon zest

  • Pastel blue

  • Spring green

  • Plus Red, Blue, Gray and Green

BUY NOW

Additionally, both of our Essentials Pen Sets, the Start Essentials Pen Set and the Create+ Essentials Pen Set, will be available at 25% off on our site through April 7. So, if you’re looking to stock up, or in need of a great gift, now is the time to grab one of our Essential Pen Sets!

Of course, all of these offers are good only while supplies last. We’d recommend you act quickly to be sure you have the supplies necessary to participate in some of the upcoming projects we have planned for the month of April. The new color bundles will pair well with the Spring Doodles we’re planning, and we can’t wait to work with you — and your students — to make them come to life.

Next week? We’re taking a look at unicorns. Stay tuned!

Share your pastel Fabergé eggs with us @3Doodler #3Doodler #WhatWillYouCreate

Top Projects and Resources for your 3Doodler

With the Holiday hustle and bustle beginning to die down, now is the perfect time to sit down, relax, and start creating with your 3Doodler pens – new or old!

Why Doodle?

Doodling may be the perfect way to decompress after the holiday rush! Research has linked Doodling with stress reduction.

We have compiled some helpful resources to get you started, along with some exciting projects to inspire your creativity.

If you’re an educator, please reach out to us.
We’ll gladly help you kick off the new year with 3Doodler EDU, and offer tips and support tailored for your specific classroom needs.

Getting Started

More resources for 3Doodler Start here.

More resources for 3Doodler Create+ here.

Inspirational Projects

– BEGINNER DOODLES –


Make the sweetest homemade cookies with DIY stamps.

let's bake


Doodle a tree to hold your Jewelry.

treet yourself


Keep your headphones tidy with a Puppy Headphones Wrap!

Puppy Love

– INTERMEDIATE DOODLES –


Add some flowery flare to your ensemble with these Pearl Floral Earrings!

Flower Power


Craft a life-size Rhinoceros Beetle.

Take Flight

– ADVANCED DOODLES –


Create a beautiful atmosphere in your home with these Tiffany Candle Holders.

Bright Idea


Make a model of a V-Twin engine! It even has moving pieces!

Jump Start

Have a question? 3Doodler Customer Service is here for you.

Contact Us

“Should you ever need assistance, 3Doodler’s customer service is by far the most responsive we’ve encountered.” – The Wirecutter

Draw in Wood with the Create+ 3D Printing Pen!

After months of running our Wood filaments through their paces, you can now 3D print in Walnut, Cherry, White Birch and Natural Wood with the 3Doodler Create+ Pen! Now you can make your own wooden sculptures, photo frames, phone cases, or even fix broken floorboards quickly and easily.

Why Wood?!

Made with real wood fiber, all four of our wood filaments allow you to make lightweight structures with a woody finish and a (satisfying) wood aroma. One of the great things about this material is how flexible it is. Prefer a smoother finish? Buff the surface with sanding paper. Want to engrave a message? Carve it with your 3Doodler’s hot nozzle tip. You can also stain the wood to accentuate the detailing of your designs. Want to go truly next level? Apply shellac for a bold glossy finish.

Hey Woody! What shall I make?

With the versatility of our wood filament, the possibilities are as immense as a Giant Sequoia. If you’re new to 3D pen drawing, start with something simple like a Christmas tree for the holidays. Want to build something fun and display-worthy? How about some moveable puppets or these charming row boats (we tested them, and they do float!).

Get artisanal and make yourself a beautiful trinket dish to hold your jewelry and keys. Or if you’re a dollhouse collector, this is the miniature rocking chair mic drop you’ve been waiting for! Finally, for DIYers, go ahead and fix that nagging chip in your floor board in a hot second!

Tips & Tricks
  • When using our 3Doodler Wood filaments with the 3Doodler Create+, make sure to set your pen to the PLA temperature setting and extrude on Slow Speed for the best results.

  • If you are using a Create DoodlePad® , simply flip it over and use the back of it – this makes it easier for you to remove your Doodle after it has cooled and hardened.

Purchase a 3Doodler Create+ Pen and 3D print in Wood now:

How To Draw In 3D with a 3D pen

How do you make 3D objects with 3Doodler? The most obvious answer is to Doodle freehand in the air. But don’t stop there – there are also other techniques that you can try out to achieve the same, or even better, results. Who knows, you might even prefer these methods as you climb the learning curve towards becoming a 3D drawing expert!

In this guide to 3D drawing, we look at how you can assemble a three-dimensional object using Doodled 2D parts, a little like building with Lego blocks, as well as making your own molds, and more. Here are some basic techniques:

Build a cube

A great way to practice assembling your Doodles is by building a cube.

  • Step 1

    On a piece of paper, draw a 3x3cm square. Doodle to create six two-dimensional square pieces. If you are using a 3Doodler Start Pen, you can use a Start DoodlePad® as a Doodling surface.
  • Step 2

    Place the bottom piece flat on your work surface, then hold up a side piece so that it’s propped up against the bottom piece.
  • Step 3

    Apply a bit of plastic at the corners where the pieces meet to hold it in place. Then Doodle along the entire joint to secure it.
  • Step 4

    Repeat for each side of the cube, and you’re done! Now use the same technique to go beyond 3D cubes to create almost any structure.

Create a sphere

When creating a round shape like a sphere, we recommend using a mold to get that perfect 3D shape. Check out the 3Doodler Start Doodlemolds® Basic Set, make your own sphere mold out of some rolled up paper and masking tape, or use and recycle items you already have at home!

  • Step 1

    Get started by using your ping pong ball as your 3D mold and wrapping it with masking tape. Doodle a line around the middle of the ball, and work your way toward one end to create a semi-sphere.

    TIP: If you don’t have a ping pong ball, you can also use the balloon technique from this fairy lights tutorial instead.

  • Step 2

    Leaving a little space, Doodle another semi-sphere on the other side of the ping pong ball.
  • Step 3

    Use a nail file or small pair of scissors to slide around the inside of your semi-spheres and pop them off your ping-pong ball. They should come off easily once they’re a little loose!

    CAUTION: Adults should help children with this step!

  • Step 4

    Add some plastic to join the two semi-spheres together to form a whole sphere!

    Almost any object can be used to make a 3D mold for your creations. Try picking up a random household object and using it as a starting point for your next 3D masterpiece.

Make a figurine or animal

When making more complex structures like a figurine or animal, you can build your own molds with paper, masking tape, and a few household items.

  • Step 1

    Sketch out your character and draw simplified shapes onto each body part (e.g: a circle for the head, cylinders for legs, a rectangular prism for the body). Write down the rough measurements for each of these shapes.
  • Step 2

    Find objects that match these basic shapes (e.g. pencils or rolls of paper for legs, a ping pong ball for the head, a glass bottle for the body). If you can’t find the right objects, scrunch up some waste paper into the desired shape. Be sure to wrap each of your molds with masking tape before Doodling onto the surface.

    TIP: A 3Doodler Create pen can melt other plastics, so use surfaces like paper, glass, clay and wood to be safe. Always wrap them with masking tape to ensure easy removal of your finished Doodle. And you can also sketch out your Doodling onto the tape itself.

  • Step 3

    Doodle half of each shape and pop off the solidified plastic before Doodling the second half. Then join the two halves together using your 3Doodler to create each completed body part.

    TIP: If you are using scrunched up paper or other expendable material as a mold, you may want to completely cover the mold and leave the paper inside of your Doodle.

  • Step 4

    Assemble all body parts by Doodling them together. You can Doodle flat parts and attach them or simply add the basic shape to create protruding parts like ears and toes.
  • Step 5

    Add details like facial features directly onto your piece and play with textures for fur or hair. You can also use nozzle tips for fine details and finishing touches.

    TIP: Use the smoothing tool tip to scrape off mistakes and redoodle parts.

  • Step 6

    All done! Don’t forget to show off your Doodle by tagging #whatwillyoucreate!

An even more advanced way to make the base structure is to use ABS plastic to create a frame. With the frame built out, you can Doodle over it using either PLA or ABS to complete the shape. For example, to make the shape of legs, simply Doodle rings of incremental sizes, then join the pieces together. Finally, fill up the gaps by connecting the rings. See how 3D pen artist Heather Baharally creates her frames with the 3Doodler Start Pen to create a beautiful, realistic octopus.

Ready to create more? You’re going to love these tutorials and stencils that we’ve prepared for you.
To purchase 3Doodler products, visit our store here.

Customer Service Appreciation Week at 3Doodler!

It’s Customer Service Week, and there’s no better time to show our appreciation for the amazing people who support our community on a daily basis. At 3Doodler, we’re proud to say we have an excellent Customer Service Team, and thankfully our community agrees.

Here’s a taster of the feedback we’ve received:
  • “I was so surprised to get such a quick response – at first I thought my message had bounced back somehow. This is how customer service should be.”

  • “So helpful, and stuck with me for more than half an hour! Glad to know people like this are helping out!”

  • “These people, who do online chat to help people with their 3Doodler pens are amazing! Without them no one would be able to fix their pen! Keep up the good work 3Doodler staff!!!”

Find out how you can show your appreciation for our team at the end of this blog.

Meet Our Awesome CS Team

Nisey Steward

– Director of Customer Experience

Hello! I’m Nisey, and it’s my job to lead the best team here at 3Doodler – the Customer Service team. I also work with the other departments on projects to make sure customers have the best possible experience with 3Doodler from the get-go, and throughout their user journey.

What’s your goal?

My current goal is to beat Doom on my Nintendo Switch. Wait, you mean work wise? Can you erase that last answer? No? Fine! My current WORK goal is to always push my team to be better, aiming for that 100% satisfaction rating. I treat each and every interaction with the customer as a learning experience, and we use feedback to be better as a team and a company.

What’s a typical day at work like?

A typical day at work for me includes going through all of the feedback left by customers in our ticketing system, touching base with the team about what they are working on for the day, and emails, lots of emails. French vanilla iced coffee makes the emails better.

What do you like to do in your free time?

I have a passion for collecting sneakers. I buy what I like, not necessarily what everyone else gets. Just like with any other passion, purchases must come from the heart.
Something else about me… I was born and primarily raised in NYC (my soul is Southern). I could watch Law and Order SVU all day. I studied Criminal Justice, so law is life. I love numbers and have my tax preparers license. My entire heart has been captured by my best friend!

Tell us about your Personality Doodle

My Personality Doodle reflects my passion for sneakers. There is a Hexbug inside that makes it dance with love! Favorite thing I have ever seen!!

Evie Johnson

– Customer Service Manager

Hi there! As CS Manager, I help customers through emails, live chats, phone calls, social media, and video calls, and I love ensuring our customers are happy and well taken care of. I also help educators get acquainted with their 3Doodler Learning Packs, and talk with them about using 3Doodler pens in their classrooms. The 3Doodler Customer Service team is truly the best team in the world! I am grateful for every day I get to work with them and help support team-wide processes and successes! I also love assisting other departments with side projects, and helping them achieve their goals.

What’s your goal?

One important goal of mine is to get to know our customers better. I am researching how to better support them, and how we can accommodate their needs and wants to the best of our ability. I also strive to maintain “top shelf” customer service with positive customer feedback.

What’s a typical day at work like?

Daily, I check inboxes, answer phones, have video calls with customers, and have fun connecting with my team in our Slack channels. One of my favorite tasks is taking time to connect with 3Doodler artists that make visionary works of art, and supporting them as best as I can! I also spend time proofreading material, uploading and editing our EDU Lesson Plans, and receiving guidance from the amazing leaders in our company, which aids my professional development. On a daily basis I do my best to support 3Doodler in being the best company in the world!

What do you like to do in your free time?

As far as extracurricular activities go, I love practicing yoga and making art! My best friend is a tiny cat named Kali Maa, and her coat is mostly black with flecks of beige and orange. In my spare time I love reading, drinking tea, and spending time with my cat. Kali inspires my love for all animals! I have spent over 700 hours volunteering in wildlife rehabilitation, and I also rescue injured and orphaned animals if I happen to find them.

Tell us about your Personality Doodle

My Personality Doodle is of a cat because I adore cats! It is in an ornate frame that I Doodled as well. It was made with the 3Doodler Create using ABS and PLA.

Andrea Macias

– Customer Support Technician

Hey, I’m Andrea. I help cultivate relationships between the customer and our products through every interaction. I help remind customers why 3Doodler is the best choice and help guide them in the best direction to bring their imagination to life.

What’s your goal?

I strive to create 3Doodler promoters who understand that what separates 3Doodler from other companies is our customer service. I strive to help customers know that our goal isn’t to sell you the most expensive pen, but rather to introduce you to a pen that suits your needs and helps you bring your imagination to life.

What’s a typical day at work like?

I’m super organized! I begin my day by writing down my daily work tasks and checking them off as I complete them. I interact with customers via our ticketing system, social media and phone calls. I comb through the data received from customer interactions to analyze our data trends, and I ship out any replacement items that need to be shipped.

What do you like to do in your free time?

I love to film and edit makeup, cooking, fitness and hair How-To videos. I have a son named David (9 years old) and a Yorkshire named Biscuit, a.k.a. CornBread. I love, love, love going to the gym, but mainly because I have the biggest sweet tooth ever.

Tell us about your Personality Doodle

My Doodles show my style. The Powerpuff Doodle I made for the 1st 3Doodler NYC event I attended. The mini ramen bowl shows my love for tiny Doodles of food. The skeleton helped me get to the know the different nozzle types and plastics, and how they bring out the different textures found on the skeleton itself. Last, but not least, is my Biscuit Doodle, which is almost the same size as him.

Dani Chillemi

– Customer Support Ninja

Hi! As CS Ninja, I connect with customers and help troubleshoot or educate about 3Doodler products. I strive to make sure customers know that they’re speaking with an actual human who just wants to help them. I know how discouraging it is to wait a long time for a response, only to have it be robotic and unhelpful.

What’s your goal?

I want the customers I connect with to feel like they’re reaching out to a buddy for assistance with something, and have them really feel that I’m happy to help them. I also strive to be fast in my response time to reassure the customer that I’m here and ready to resolve any issues.

What’s a typical day at work like?

On a typical work day, I make coffee then zone out on my laptop with daily tasks, such as answering emails, troubleshooting issues for customers, answering calls, browsing 3Doodler-related content on social media, taking care of spreadsheets, and now and then I’ll grab a 3Doodler and start doodling.

What do you like to do in your free time?

In my free time, I love urban inline skating, hanging out with my dog, going on adventures with my soul buddy, and pondering life and the universe (whoa, that’s deep, man). I like to practice just being, chilling and enjoying the moment, while gently nudging myself to continually grow and evolve, even if my pace is that of a sloth.

Tell us about your Personality Doodle

My Doodle is an urban inline skate; it’s based on one of my skates with 3x110mm wheels. It represents having fun, exploring, feeling free, and growing stronger.

Want to show a little love to our CS team and get 25% off your next purchase?
Show your appreciation by leaving a review on Trustpilot, then send us an email ([email protected]) with a link to your review. We’ll send you a 25% off discount coupon!

Coupon Conditions: The coupon will be one time use, for a minimum of US$10, and a maximum of US$500, and will expire on 31st December 2018.

Simple 3D Pen DIY Halloween Costume Ideas For Adults

Whether your Halloween personality is scary, funny, or sweet, dressing up and making your own costume is one of our favorite parts of this holiday. You don’t have to spend megabucks on store-bought items to look awesome, instead, try out these easy-to-make 3D printed Halloween costume ideas for affordable, fantastic-looking outfits!

We know the thought of making a costume can seem overwhelming – but don’t worry, we’ve gathered only the easiest projects which use the 3Doodler Create+ 3D Pen and a variety of Create plastics.

Subtle but scary Halloween Jewelry:

If you don’t want to go over-the-top with your costume, but want something that achieves that spooky effect in a subtle way, this slit-throat choker necklace is the perfect accessory.

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Steps

Dress up as your favorite character

A sure-fire way to make realistic Halloween Star Trek™ costume parts is with the Star Trek Project Kit. Follow the stencils included, or design your own stencils to “3D print” any costume you like without investing in expensive 3D printers or complicated software.

Steps
  • Things you’ll need: 3Doodler Create+ pen, Create Star Trek Project Kit

  • Identify accessories or unique traits that your character possess (for example, for Spock it would be his ears).

  • Use a stencil to trace out the shape. The Create Star Trek Project Kit comes with Star Trek themed stencils, but you can easily draw your own for your character or find stencils online.

  • Add 3D details to finish.

DIY Halloween headbands

Dress up as a sweet and magical unicorn, stand out from the crowd with bats flying above your head, or go for a classic “arrow through the head” look with these DIY Halloween Headbands

How to make a Unicorn Headband

These ears and horn make a whimsical prop to complete your Halloween Unicorn costume. They would also make a wonderful party craft, or could even be handed out as party favors!

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Steps
  • Things you’ll need: 3Doodler Create+ pen, Halloween Headbands stencil, Create PLA plastic, paper, clear tape, headband.

  • Roll paper into the shape of the unicorn horns, then cover with clear tape.

  • Make the horn while spinning the paper cone using one hand and Doodling with the other. Add final details, then remove the Doodle from the cone.

  • Print the Unicorn ears stencil here, place a Create DoodlePad over the stencil, then Doodle over it using PLA plastic.

  • Attach the horn and the ears onto a headband.

How to make a Flying Bats Headband

This headband is fun, cool and festive – and it’s perfect for last minute Halloween DIY projects! You could even pair this with a witch hat for your flying bats to circle.

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Steps

How to make an Arrow Headband

Add some humor to your rustic Halloween look with this super easy and classic arrow through head prop!

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Steps

DIY Halloween Spider Web

This project is perfect for the whole family! Simply print out the stencil in different sizes to make cobwebs for both kids and adults. There’s so many things you can do with it: you can attach the cobweb to your shirt, pin it in your hair, or even decorate corners of your house!

Download Stencil

Steps

If these costumes inspired you, be sure to take a photo and share your creations with us via Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. Tag @3Doodler so we can see your work!

All of these projects are made using the 3Doodler Create+ pen and Create FLEXY plastic.

Happy Doodling!

Top 10 Questions About How to Create 3D Pen Art with 3Doodler Create+

Prolific 3Doodler Printing Pen Artist, Grace Du Prez, has been Doodling since 2014 and has worked on record breaking projects, such as a life sized car for Nissan. She is also the host of our Bluprint 3D Pen Art series.

Grace has been running 3D Pen Creation workshops for two years, so she knows all the best tips and tricks for beginners. She has gathered the top 10 most common questions she’s received since the beginning of her Doodling career, and answered them here.

1. How do I use a 3D Pen? What can I make with a 3Doodler?

There are three main ways to use a 3D pen like 3Doodler.

Use a 3D pen design Template or Stencil

This technique is great for beginners to draw flat designs. You can also use this technique to construct simple 3D shapes like a cube. Make 6 flat squares then join together to create the 3D shape. There are lots of 3Doodler stencils available for free online.

Using a Stencil

Freestyle Doodling

This involves drawing up into the air or building an object up by layering. This is one of the most common ways we’ve seen 3Doodler art being made. This technique can require a bit of practice as you’re using your eye to judge if it looks right.

Using Molds

This involves drawing over a pre-existing object, such as a salad bowl. The plastic will set in that shape and can be removed when you’re done, or remain on the object. If it’s something like a bowl it can be done in one piece. If the shape is something like a ball, you can make the two halves and then join together afterwards. Something like a balloon can be drawn over and then deflated. This technique is used in my Lantern Lights video. There are some great canvas mold 3Doodler projects available, or you can use any household object as long as it’s covered in masking tape – even a smartphone!

For more 3Doodler tips and tricks, take a look at my Getting Started video.

2. Why is there a red light on my 3Doodler pen? What do the different light colors mean?

Don’t worry, the red light is totally normal and just means that the pen is heating up to the right temperature. When it’s ready to extrude plastic, the red light will change to either blue or green. It’s important to have it on the right heat setting as each plastic melts at a specific temperature. Blue for ABS and Flexy, and Green for PLA.

Many people are concerned about 3D pen safety. The 3Doodler pen has a great safety feature – if you’ve taken a short break, the pen will start to cool itself down. This means that the red light will come on again. Simply turn the pen off, and then on again, and it will automatically start warming up to the temperature you set it to.

3. Why is the plastic not coming out of my 3Doodler 3D pen?

If your 3Doodler is not feeding, try giving the plastic a gentle push into the pen (but make sure you have clicked either FAST or SLOW first). When your filament has run out, just insert the next strand to keep the plastic flowing.

It’s better to push the plastic from a point on the strand that is close to the pen, otherwise you risk bending and damaging your plastic filament.

If the 3Doodler plastic is jammed, there are a few questions you can ask yourself: Are you on the right heat setting? Each plastic melts at a specific temperature so if it’s not on the right one it won’t melt. Is there a flashing blue or green light? You may have gone into reverse by mistake, a function that is engaged by double clicking on either FAST or SLOW button. To be on the safe side if you’ve done this, fully reverse the plastic out, snip the frayed end of the filament off with a pair of scissors or pliers, and try reinserting it.

4. Should I use FAST or SLOW mode when using the 3Doodler 3D pen?

There is no right or wrong option here, it’s about finding what feels right for you and adapting to the situation.

Benefits of FAST mode
  • It gets the project done in less time, and is ideal for those large-scale projects.

  • It’s good for welding two pieces of plastic together. As the plastic is extruding more quickly it stays hotter for longer, which helps to re-melt the plastic you’re welding and give you a more stable connection.

Benefits of SLOW mode
  • It’s better for beginners as you have more time to think ahead and control your 3D pen.

  • It’s great for drawing up into the air. When in SLOW mode, the plastic is making more contact with the cool air around it and setting in that position. This will really help you perfect those spirals and staircases!

  • When using 3Doodler Flexy plastic, it’s better to be on SLOW mode.

5. How do I start my 3Doodler 3D pen?

Simply click either FAST or SLOW once to start. To stop, click either button once again. A common mistake is to press and hold the button, which you don’t need to do, as the plastic will continually extrude with one click.

Something else to watch out for is that there is a slight delay between pressing a button and the plastic extruding. Avoid clicking multiple times as you’ll just be starting and stopping your pen repeatedly.

6. How should I hold the 3Doodler 3D pen?

Hold it like you would a marker pen. You can hover your index finger over the buttons so that you can easily start and stop. Some find it easier to turn it upside down so that the clear plastic window is facing up and your thumb is hovering over the buttons. What’s important is that you find a way that suits you.

Hold at a 90-degree angle

You might naturally want to hold the pen at a 45-degree angle and move it at the speed you would with a regular pen or pencil. This can result in an inconsistent texture in the plastic. Instead, try holding your 3Doodler at a 90-degree angle so that it’s vertical to the page. This will make sure that the plastic extrudes evenly – imagine that you are mimicking a 3D printing machine!

Try experimenting with the speed that you move your hand. The slower you move, the thicker the Doodled line, and therefore the stronger your creation will be.

Test to see the difference between pressing down onto the page, versus hovering slightly above the page. Making contact with the page will give you a more precise line that will stick to the template, whereas having the pen tip hovering will result in a random squiggly effect. Have a look at my Getting Started video for the 7 top techniques on using a 3Doodler 3D pen.

7. How do I change the plastic color in my 3Doodler 3D Pen?

There are two ways to change the plastic color in your pen. If the filament is sticking out of the feed port, you can reverse the strand and gently pull it out, then load your desired color. If the strand is too short to pull out of the feed port, you can carefully remove the hot nozzle with the mini spanner (be sure to do this with the pen turned on and heated up), engage the reverse function, and insert the unblocking tool through the nozzle end of the pen. This will push the short strand out of the rear of the pen. Then you can replace the nozzle with the mini spanner, being careful not to overtighten it, and load the new strand of filament.

Double-click to reverse strand, then remove

The plastic doesn’t need to go to waste! There are a lot of fun things you can make with half a strand of filament. You could even try out these projects to transform leftover plastic into beautiful jewelry and decor items!

Don’t try to apply too much force to pull the filament out, as you could end up doing some damage to the pen. Simply double click either the FAST or SLOW button, and the pen will do the hard work for you. Once it’s finished reversing, gently pull out the plastic. Watch this video to see how it works.

Reversed filaments may have a wispy ends, which can get tangled up in the mechanism of the pen. It’s important for you to snip it off before re-inserting it into the pen.

8. How do I get rid of mistakes in my 3Doodler art?

Mistakes are bound to happen, even for the most professional Doodlers. The nozzle tip can help you melt away pieces you don’t want on your design. You could also use scissors to create a super accurate edge. They need to be sharp, but don’t use your best sewing scissors as it may blunt them.

9. Why are there wispy strands on my 3Doodler creation, and how do I get rid of them?

You might notice that there are some ‘hairy’ bits on your creation. They can easily be melted away using the nozzle tip, but it’s better if you don’t make them in the first place (unless it’s intended)!

These might be caused by lifting the pen away from your work too quickly. A bit like mozzarella on a pizza! Once you’ve pressed stop, count to three and then pull away. You’ll get a much cleaner finish.

10. Is 3Doodler plastic environmentally friendly?

PLA (Poly Lactic Acid) is a biodegradable type of plastic that is made from the starch of plants such as corn, sugar cane or sugar beet. This means that it is environmentally friendly and sustainable. With the right conditions it can take approximately 6-12 months to break down compared to other plastics, which can take hundreds of years.

ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) can be recycled, but it is not widely accepted by local authorities. Don’t let that stop you, as you can do it yourself at home with a few easy steps!

Read more about 3Doodler’s Plastics Promise here.

For more tips on using the 3Doodler, take a look at our Hot Tips collection and you may just find the answers you need! Still can’t find what you need? Reach out to us and we will be more than happy to help you out.

Learning how to learn with 3Doodler Learning Packs

Recently we had the opportunity to interview Oletha Walker of JFK Elementary School, and Blair Cochran of Melrose High School, both of whom use the 3Doodler Learning Packs in their classrooms.

Upon first glance, Oletha and Blair’s classrooms are quite different. Oletha Walker is a charismatic Challenge Resource and Project learning teacher of a young and dynamic group of students from grades 3-5. Her class is all about getting messy and having fun while learning. Blair Cochran is an outstanding high school Science teacher, with an ambitious group of students who are passionate about the subject. He leads his students to delve deeper into a topic, to ensure they truly understand it. Despite their differences, they have one thing is common: both classrooms enjoy hands-on learning experiences.

Visualizing concepts in 3D with Oletha’s class

Oletha is a strong believer in the benefits of hands-on learning to help engage both the left and right side of the brain. She believes it encourages trial and error, embracing and learning from mistakes, and trying again.

With the 3Doodler Start Learning Pack, Oletha’s students are able to put their thoughts into something that’s visual and tangible.

This is not new to them, as Oletha’s classroom is equipped with a traditional 3D printer – which sounds very cool. In practice however, Oletha found herself having to sit next to the printer to keep the students away from it due to its heat warnings. Her students could only standby and wait for a single print to be shared with the whole class.

“The 3Doodler frees up time” – Oletha

"This little tool is a game changer. I have seen students that usually have low motivation come to life when they have this tool in their hands. It does not matter what their learning abilities are, anyone can successfully use this tool."-Oletha Share

Ever since introducing the 3Doodler to her class, every student has access to their own tool and is able to quickly and easily create their own item. There is no concern over anyone being injured, because the pens’ tips don’t reach high temperatures. Now Oletha has the freedom to circle around the class, guiding, monitoring, and giving feedback. More of her lesson plans can be accomplished because the students are able to work quickly and analyze and revise their designs before class time is over, as there is no downtime waiting for the printer to complete the layering. “As we all know, there is never enough time in one class to accomplish all that you would want,” Oletha commented.

Design, Build, Modify

In one of her classes, Oletha’s students were tasked with designing their own aquaponics system that could be used in someone’s apartment. Traditionally, a lesson like this would be limited to drawings, but with the 3Doodler, this lesson went to a whole new dimension. Her students were able to demonstrate their ideas more accurately with their 3D designs, make needed modifications, and build discourse around what they were designing.

What’s next?

For the next school year, Oletha is excited to have the entire school reimagine their town. Each person will imagine a futuristic version of their town and then create a model using the 3Doodler. This will be displayed so visitors to the school can see how the students envision their town to become.

Exploring and testing new learnings in Blair’s class

A typical lesson in Blair’s class goes like this: the class discusses the new topic for 10 minutes, then actively explores that topic further (which can take on a bunch of different formats), followed by some reading up and videos to strengthen their understanding of it. Blair likes to break down the topics into bite-sized chunks so the students can focus on a single understanding and how it is linked to other ideas.

What Blair’s students love the most about using the 3Doodler is the ability to physically create what they have pictured in their mind. When it comes to exploring a new topic, the students are able to ‘sketch’ their understanding of it and test it out. Moreover, Blair appreciates how easy the students have found this tool is to use.

"There was very little start up time. All my students were using the pens successfully within a couple of minutes."-Blair Share

Connecting the dots

During a lesson on circuits, students used the 3Doodler to create 3D models of voltage in a circuit. Blair has found that students typically struggle conceptually with this unit. What Blair has done for years is draw the circuit and have the students draw the 3D images of the voltage. With the 3Doodler, the students were able to physically create these plots instead. “I believe that the ability to create these models gave the students a new way to access the concept, and thus provided more students a pathway to learning,” Blair commented.

What’s next?

For the next school year, Blair is looking forward to incorporating the 3Doodler Learning Packs into the school’s MakerSpace and more of his classroom units.

Interested in our EDU Learning Packs?

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We want to say a huge thank you to both Oletha and Blair, for graciously welcoming our team into their classes. We had such a great time and were overjoyed to see the students using the 3Doodler and having fun with it.

Introducing the new 3Doodler EDU Learning Packs

Anyone who is familiar with the 3Doodler brand will recognize that our Purpose is to inspire and enable everyone to create. As a tactile tool, there’s a natural fit of our product in learning Art & Design, STEM, and other academic disciplines, corroborated by the growing demand from classrooms over the last few years. To continue to meet students’ learning needs, it’s important for us to constantly improve our EDU products and ensure the best possible classroom experience for our users.

A first glance of our Learning Packs

Designed with teachers, for their classrooms

We have spent countless hours working on the redesigned Learning Packs, with the outcome of an easier, better experience for teachers and their student users. Finally, with the launch of these products today, we’d like to share the thinking behind the new design!

All our 3D pens are made to be as simple and easy to learn as possible, avoiding obstacles between a user and their ability to create. This quality had to be carried through every aspect of the new EDU Learning Pack product experience, from the moment the teacher and students open their boxes, to when they make their first doodle. And what better way to truly understand the needs of teachers and students in the classroom, than to ask teachers?

3 Design Thinking Pillars

After numerous consultations with teachers who use the 3Doodler, it became clear to us that there were 3 consistent themes in what they were looking for:

Simple to understand

“If they don’t use it, lose it.” The first step to making our Learning Packs more valuable, was by removing components that don’t add value for teachers. We took out what they thought was least useful in the EDU Bundle, making room for more items, such as education-specific learning materials and robust containers.

With the contents that remained, we redesigned the creatives, the wording, and the overall layout, to make the information more clear, concise, and easily digestible. We also learned that teachers and students find it easier to process images rather than words alone, so we added more visual examples, and less text, in our guides.

Efficient use of time

Teachers are busy people. Finding the time to plan a new lesson is a challenge, let alone to introduce a whole new way of enabling student learning. To overcome this, we had to find a solution that helped teachers save time – before, during, and after the class. An important component in saving time for teachers was to make the Learning Packs extremely accessible to students, so that they could take charge of their own learning journey with 3Doodler.

"Students can help themselves to their own pens and accessories, and grab plastics from the huge assortment available in the Plastics Kit." Share

The new Learning Pack contains a Teachers’ Kit, Students’ Kits, and a Plastic Kit. Before class, the teacher can familiarize him/herself with the Teachers’ Kit, which comes with a checklist of items to go through, a cheatsheet, and lesson plans and activity guides. During the lesson, the class can refer to a specially designed poster (included in the Learning Pack) on doodling basics. A troubleshooting guide and set of tools is also available for quick fixes. By creating multiple easy-to-grab Student Kits, students can help themselves to their own pens and accessories, and grab plastics from the huge assortment available in the Plastics Kit.

Separating out the kits this way makes the material management easier for the teacher. They no longer need to spend time on distributing the tools and figuring out all the components, eliminating confusion and chances of errors. Student teams will also appreciate a sense of ownership over their own kits! After the lesson, students simply have to return all materials into their compartments, ready for the next class.

Friendly and intuitive to all

The Activity Guide and free lesson plans, tutorials, and stencils on our website have all been designed with teachers, and with the aim to inspire everyone to create, no matter their age or artistic ability. Building a dinosaur fossil may appear overly ambitious, but not if you have a stencil you could print and use. A roller coaster model seems impossible to make? Not if you can follow a step-by-step guide.

There are ideas for everyone, and limitless things to create, play with, and learn from. All it takes is to start.

Check out our new Learning Packs here

Learn More

Think Like A Doodler

The other day, my fifth-grade students were brainstorming problem-solving technologies for future homes. Hands immediately flew up in the air. “Robots that wash dishes!” “Robots that walk your dog.” “Robots that do your homework.” I finally had to stem the tide of robotic responses with a reminder that these things already exist.

I challenged students to think beyond what they’ve read and seen to come up with their own ideas. “Think like a Doodler!” I told them! My students immediately understood the meaning of this directive, because doodling has been at the heart of so many of our classroom activities. Through their doodling experiences, my students have learned the following:

Doodling is Inquiry-Based

We always begin doodling by posing a question or problem. This is followed by a design process that paves the way to new learning. Within this format, the teacher serves as the guide, while students take the lead, doodling their ideas, testing them, improving them and retesting them in a fun, motivating fashion. Problems spawn solutions.

Doodling to Connect The Dots

Doodling is a physical experience that taps into prior learning while building neural pathways. I call this “connective learning,” because doodling bridges the old with the new, conflating the two into sparkling innovations. Doodlers know that great ideas come from thinking across experiences. Leonardo Da Vinci would have made a great doodler in the way he stemmed the tides of disciplines, like anatomy, geology, and mathematics in his inventions.

One Doodle in a Million

Doodles come in all different shapes and sizes. There has never been (and never will be) a one-size-fits-all approach to doodling in our room. Students are amazed at the range of solutions generated by their peers when given a doodle-design challenge. Doodling is an open-ended way of thinking that encourages a vast array of opinions and perspectives nurturing a growing bank of possibilities.

Empathic-Doodlers

Doodling enhances thought through feelings. Doodlers are receptive to the needs of others, connecting in ways that go beyond words. When you doodle, you open your heart to different perspectives, cultures, and ways of being. Characteristics like kindness and compassion not only generate ideas, they enhance our world.

For students to think like Doodlers, teachers must allow them the freedom to expand their frame of mind, nurturing a new language of invention that embraces doodles of all shapes, sizes, and color. Doodlers know that great ideas result from a diversity of lines and textures, awakening our creative spirit.

So, when was the last time you encouraged your students to think like a Doodler?

Julia Dweck is a public school teacher who works with students in grades K-5, focusing on the importance of creative and open-ended thinking. Julia is the 2016 winner of the Da Vinci Science Award for her innovative integration of technology in the classroom.

She serves as a school resource and exemplar for inventive implementation of the arts and sciences. Julia encourages her students, friends, and peers to take risks, whenever possible, in order to grow. Follow her on Twitter @GiftedTawk

4 Ways We Gave Back In 2017

Dear 3Doodler Community,

First of all, I’d like to say a huge thank you to you for another fantastic year. As 2017 comes to an end, I’d like to take this opportunity to share some special community highlights with you.

3Doodler strives to be a company that inspires and enables you to make. Our products and activities reflect our ongoing commitment to our community of innovative Doodlers, talented artists, and last but not least, inspirational teachers and students. I hope these examples will place the spotlight on some very meaningful charities and talented individuals, and bring awareness to the difference they are making every day.

– Daniel Cowen, President & COO of 3Doodler

1. Adapting Our Product For All Users

Ever since we launched our first pen in 2013, we’ve received interest from members of the blind and low vision community, including teachers and students, all envisioning ways to use 3Doodler pens to create instant tactile graphics they can touch and feel. 2017 saw a breakthrough in this area, which we hope paves the way for blind and low vision users to create in entirely new ways.

Partnering with RNIB, UK’s leading charity supporting blind and partially sighted people, we adapted the 3Doodler Start with new features to make it easier for people with sight loss to use. These features include tactile markings on the pen itself, and audio instructions on our website, all aimed at helping users get started and orient the pen for 3D drawing.

See what BBC News reported

2. Encouraging Hands-on Learning in Classrooms

From Nov ‘16 to Feb ‘17, we partnered with DonorsChoose.org to help teachers make creative tech a reality for their classrooms. The US based non-profit organization enables donations directly to public school classroom projects. As part of our commitment to this,3Doodler matched each donation to classroom projects requesting a 3Doodler EDU Bundle. In 2016, 283 projects were fully funded, raising a total of $200K.

One year later, in Nov 2017, we launched a second campaign. At the time of writing this article, we’ve raised $65,263 and counting. We also allocated extra funds for special education teachers, and the response has been phenomenal. The message is clear: making our products easy to access for all types of learners will be one of our main focuses as we enter 2018. Watch this space!

3. Supporting Creators in all Shapes & Sizes

In 2017, there has been no shortage of creative talent. We’ve discovered, and been approached by, professional sculptors, fashion designers, art teachers, jewellery designers, as well as countless creators from different backgrounds, who all use the 3Doodler in ways we never imagined.

Sometimes creators need a little boost to shoot for their particular moon. We’ve offered feedback and advice to those who have asked, sponsored and encouraged artists to hold their first ever exhibition, and supported creators with 115 pens and 11,560 strands of plastic… In return, we’ve seen creations that made our jaws drop and our eyes ogle. ROI = priceless. These moments and collaborations give us the inspiration we need to do our best every day.

Some Artists We Worked With

4. Making Magic with Toys & Play

Play forms a huge and integral part of a child’s growth. We are a strong believer of Toy Industry Foundation’s mission to provide joy and comfort to children in need through the experience of toys and play. The Foundation makes play possible for families struggling in poverty, military families, kids undergoing cancer treatments, children with special needs, and many more.

We donated to the charity to help bring even more smiles and laughter to the lives of some very special kids.

With these efforts (and many more to come), 3Doodler is helping build a more innovative and caring world; supporting kids and adults who dare to imagine and create.

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