Simple 3D Pen DIY Halloween Costume Ideas For Adults

Whether your Halloween personality is scary, funny, or sweet, dressing up and making your own costume is one of our favorite parts of this holiday. You don’t have to spend megabucks on store-bought items to look awesome, instead, try out these easy-to-make 3D printed Halloween costume ideas for affordable, fantastic-looking outfits!

We know the thought of making a costume can seem overwhelming – but don’t worry, we’ve gathered only the easiest projects which use the 3Doodler Create+ 3D Pen and a variety of Create plastics.

Subtle but scary Halloween Jewelry:

If you don’t want to go over-the-top with your costume, but want something that achieves that spooky effect in a subtle way, this slit-throat choker necklace is the perfect accessory.

Download Stencil

Steps

Dress up as your favorite character

A sure-fire way to make realistic Halloween Star Trek™ costume parts is with the Star Trek Project Kit. Follow the stencils included, or design your own stencils to “3D print” any costume you like without investing in expensive 3D printers or complicated software.

Steps
  • Things you’ll need: 3Doodler Create+ pen, Create Star Trek Project Kit

  • Identify accessories or unique traits that your character possess (for example, for Spock it would be his ears).

  • Use a stencil to trace out the shape. The Create Star Trek Project Kit comes with Star Trek themed stencils, but you can easily draw your own for your character or find stencils online.

  • Add 3D details to finish.

DIY Halloween headbands

Dress up as a sweet and magical unicorn, stand out from the crowd with bats flying above your head, or go for a classic “arrow through the head” look with these DIY Halloween Headbands

How to make a Unicorn Headband

These ears and horn make a whimsical prop to complete your Halloween Unicorn costume. They would also make a wonderful party craft, or could even be handed out as party favors!

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Steps
  • Things you’ll need: 3Doodler Create+ pen, Halloween Headbands stencil, Create PLA plastic, paper, clear tape, headband.

  • Roll paper into the shape of the unicorn horns, then cover with clear tape.

  • Make the horn while spinning the paper cone using one hand and Doodling with the other. Add final details, then remove the Doodle from the cone.

  • Print the Unicorn ears stencil here, place a Create DoodlePad over the stencil, then Doodle over it using PLA plastic.

  • Attach the horn and the ears onto a headband.

How to make a Flying Bats Headband

This headband is fun, cool and festive – and it’s perfect for last minute Halloween DIY projects! You could even pair this with a witch hat for your flying bats to circle.

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Steps

How to make an Arrow Headband

Add some humor to your rustic Halloween look with this super easy and classic arrow through head prop!

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Steps

DIY Halloween Spider Web

This project is perfect for the whole family! Simply print out the stencil in different sizes to make cobwebs for both kids and adults. There’s so many things you can do with it: you can attach the cobweb to your shirt, pin it in your hair, or even decorate corners of your house!

Download Stencil

Steps

If these costumes inspired you, be sure to take a photo and share your creations with us via Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. Tag @3Doodler so we can see your work!

All of these projects are made using the 3Doodler Create+ pen and Create FLEXY plastic.

Happy Doodling!

Fan Creations: Horns You Can Toot About

Passion inspires great artwork, especially in fans. That’s why we let fan creators loose with 3Doodlers for a project of their choosing.

Previously, we recorded Gina B’s initial impressions of the 3Doodler and the early stages of her project. Now, we take a look at the finished product!

Gina B wound up executing her vision of believably organic horns, complete with a headband to make them easily wearable. By mixing two shades of plastic she gave them a natural look and a more pronounced texture. She’s quite pleased with the outcome, but found that her project presented some unique challenges.

“It was more difficult and more easy for a couple different reasons,” Gina says of her project. “Using the device itself was insanely more easy and proves that all the issues I had with the first horn just came from my inexperience. I’d say that if you tinker about with it for a couple of trial pieces then you’ll feel a lot more confident when you venture out and try something on your own.”

In attempting to get the symmetry of the horns just right, Gina found some new wrinkles in horn production. “It was a lot more difficult in one sense because I was trying to replicate the mirror image of a geometric shape. I started out the same way as before, but the shape wasn’t exactly the same although I used the same pattern. I actually found it easier to follow the pattern, but the first horn kind of developed a shape of its own that looked really organic and natural.”

"If you tinker about with the 3Doodler for a couple of trial pieces then you’ll feel a lot more confident when you venture out and try something on your own." Share

That unintentional change in the first horn meant that the better execution the second time was actually a drawback. So Gina got creative.

“First I tried to build it up with extra plastic, to try to alter the shape, but the structure underneath was actually wrong. So I sat down, thought about it, prayed to the crafting gods, and had an epiphany: the whole thing is plastic, so what if I hit it with a low heat setting from my heat gun to make it bend to the shape I want?”

Gina experimented with different heat settings and was able to make the second horn malleable enough in the right sections to give it the same curve as its partner. A hot glue gun and some fabric to increase the surface area allowed her to easily attach the horns to a headband, making for a ready-to wear accessory for a horned character. Making, modifying and attaching the second horn took her two and a half hours, for a total project time of five hours.

After working with the 3Doodler, Gina is convinced that it is able to fill certain niches in cosplay design, with the potential for brand new use cases. “It’s something to explore, all new mediums have unique cases where they fit really well.”

Gina says she enjoyed exploring how to create a 3Dimensional shape that was largely freehand. In the future, she will look into using the 3Doodler in more fine-detailing roles.

Falling for Frank Lloyd Wright

The father of organic architecture turns 150 years old in June. The impact of interior designer, architect, writer, and educator, Frank Lloyd Wright can still be seen today.

Having designed over 1,000 structures in his lifetime, the work of Frank Lloyd Wright has made a lasting impact on architecture and design. In celebration of his 150th birthday, we are pleased to present a new 3Doodler Create Project Kit for Wright’s signature example of organic architecture, Fallingwater.

Celebrating 150 Years

With 532 completed structures over the span of a 70-year career, Frank Lloyd Wright has become an icon of American architecture. Twelve of his buildings are listed amongst Architectural Record’s hundred most important buildings of the century.

"We are all here to develop a life more beautiful, more concordant, more fully expressive of our own sense of pride and joy than ever before in the world."-Frank Lloyd Wright Share

Wright firmly believed that architecture was “the mother of all the arts,” and approached each design with this intensity of conviction. His aim to was to reflect the landscape, people, culture, and feel of America within his own designs and architecture.

With dramatic new shapes and designs, Wright developed what he called “organic architecture”, representing what he saw as the harmonious connection of the citizens of the United States with both each other, and to the land they call home. As such, his homes center around shared spaces such as the dining table, music rooms, and terraces to encourage a sense of community and closeness to both family and nature.

Fallingwater

None of Wright’s structures reflects the harmony between architecture and nature better than Fallingwater.

"The making of a good building, the harmonious building, one adapted to its purposes and to life, [is] a blessing to life and a gracious element added to life, is a great moral performance."-Frank Lloyd Wright Share

Constructed between 1936 and 1939, the residence was designed for the Kaufmann family in southwest Pennsylvania. Stretching over a 30-foot waterfall, the house is a shining example of Wright’s commitment to a unique architectural design that integrates family life with natural surroundings.

While the Kaufmanns had requested a house with a view of the waterfall, Wright wanted them to instead live with the water itself, and to make the falls an integral part of their everyday life. His organic design was detailed down to the colors, with only two distinct colors used in the final building, both tied closely to the materials used—the light ochre of the concrete, and Wright’s own signature Cherokee red on the steel.

Since Fallingwater first opened its doors to the public in 1964, over 4.5 million visitors have come to see Wright’s architectural masterpiece first-hand.

Recreating a Piece of History

To honor this National Historic Landmark and icon of organic architecture, 3Doodler is pleased to present a unique Fallingwater theme kit for 3Doodler Create.

In collaboration with the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, the Licensed Project Kit includes detailed stencils created from the original Fallingwater floor plans, so anyone can create Wright’s masterpiece in miniature scale. The kit also includes a visual step-by-step guide and four packs of ABS plastic to replicate the exact colors of the original structure. Learn more about the the making of this kit here.

Celebrate Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th Birthday by recreating one of the most powerful pieces of American architecture. Sign up for notifications on the release of this new kit at the3Doodler.com.

Fan Creations: Cosplaying with the 3Doodler

For some, the adventure doesn’t end when the book closes or the credits roll. Fan Creators take inspiration from their favorite movies, games, comics, and cartoons and make incredible things. To see what that passion can produce, we gave some hardcore fans the latest 3Doodler Create for two weeks.

We talked to well-known crafter and modeler of fictional costumes Gina B as she unboxed the 3Doodler, and then checked back in a week later to see how her project was going.

Few fans are as dedicated as cosplayers. They spend long hours perfecting costumes that can involve incredibly elaborate feats of sewing, sculpting, and design to show off their passion for their favorite media. And Gina B is one of the best.

With more than 37,000 likes on her Facebook page, Gina’s creations are hugely popular. That’s a testament to the care and attention to detail she uses in producing loving recreations of some of the most popular characters from comics, cartoons, and anime. Whether she’s producing an exacting replica of an ancient Korean pole-arm, or she’s putting her own spin on the outfit of a classic character, Gina is always looking for new ways to bring her work to life.

That quest for perfection has given her a wide range of experience with a diverse set of materials. “I have a lot of experience working in fabric, I do a lot of custom body suit work, as well as elaborate armor based outfits. That’s anything from complicated headpieces all the way down to belt buckles and breastplates. In terms of materials, I’ve worked with things such as foam, styrene plastics, as well as fiberglass, and I’ve even tried thermoplastic used in car dashboards.”

Gina B unboxing the 3Doodler for the first time.

As she first sat down with the 3Doodler, she says she thinks that the 3Doodler will offer her an opportunity to do the sort of fine-detail work that often relies on a 3D printing service to accomplish, and is excited by the prospect of accomplishing it with something that costs a fraction of a digital printer.

When Gina holds the unit, she immediately has ideas about what to make with it. “This has a very wide variety of use. It’s great for something small—if you have a detailed item like a belt buckle, it would lend itself really well. For existing armor, I could also do detailed overlay pieces. It would probably be easier than sanding out a product, like I usually do. Instead I could add a layer with this, since it’ll probably adhere to the plastic.”

“Ultimately, I think I’m going to make something that’s in the cosplay department but isn’t super frequently seen, which is a horn item. There are a lot of different styles, whether it’s like a ram horn or a goat horn, or something sanded down like with Hellboy. I think this will work great because what I’m making, it’s really organic and not perfectly smooth.”

A week and an extra package of yellow plastic later, Gina has a horn. It is hollow, and made out of two tones of yellow plastic, one matte, and the other glossy.

The hollow horn took Gina two and a half hours to complete, including some time to learn the ins and outs of using the 3Doodler. She says that compares favorably to the time it takes to produce the item with other methods.

"The 3Doodler has a very wide variety of use. It’s great for something small—if you have a detailed item like a belt buckle, it would lend itself really well. For existing armor, I could also do detailed overlay pieces." Share

To construct it, she used the bottom of a bowl to provide a curved surface. She doodled an internal structure, than stitched the sides together rapidly in what Gina calls a “spider like” fashion to produce a tight chain of strings. Once the initial curved shape was done, she was able to repeat the process, building upon each previously extruded section.

She’s pleased with the results. The horn is immediately identifiable, and has even had passers by asking if it came off of a ram. Making it by hand gave it a natural look Gina’s pleased with. “I think that it has a good organic swoop.”

But her project isn’t over yet. She didn’t make a unicorn horn after all. “The biggest issue now is: can I create a second one?”

Gina B's horn created with the 3Doodler

In addition to crafting a second horn, Gina also plans to use some advanced crafting techniques to enhance the horns. Sanding, priming, and maybe even painting will give them a more advanced and literally polished look. She looks forward to sharing the outcome of her work after she’s brought the horns up to her exacting standards.

Tune in a few weeks from now to see the final outcome!

DIY Accessories to Customize Your Bicycle

At 3Doodler we’re always looking for new and innovative ways to try and DIY—Doodle it yourself. For our latest exploration into Doodled additions, we decided to take our show on the road.

Avid cyclist (and 3Doodler Marketing Director) Kelley Toy teamed up with 3Doodler Product Development Engineer Samson Wong to conceptualize and road test a series of Doodled solutions for two common cycling needs: a drink bottle cage, and an action camera handlebar mount. While these solutions were prototyped and tested on a road bike, all of the designs could easily be adapted for a mountain bike, touring bike, or daily commuter.

The Prototyping Process

“I started by borrowing a bottle cage from Kelley,” Samson says. In order to start the design process, Samson needed a jumping off point. Using common accessories that any cyclist might need was the first step to getting an idea for a customized design.

While a water bottle cage attachment may seem like a simple enough design concept, Doodling one from scratch is a more complicated task. Getting the tension and strength just right while having it fit the bottle snugly is important, all the while making a sturdy enough design that would hold up to actual use.

It was also important for Samson to understand how the piece would be attached to the bike. “I needed an actual bottle cage to trace the holes used for mounting it to the bike,” Samson explains. “I made a template based on the original so I could Doodle the holes at exactly the right measurements.”

For his first prototype, Samson used the same design concept as Kelley’s old bottle cage, with two “arms” coming from the mounting to grip the bottle. “After the first Doodled trial, I found that the arms were a bit too weak,” Samson says. His Doodled version needed the right balance of strength and flexibility.

"After the first Doodled trial, I found that the arms were a bit too weak." Share

In his next prototype, he knew better what improvements he needed to make. “The second design focused on reinforcing the two arms,” he says. “To make it strong enough I Doodled three layers of ABS, building up the plastic to be roughly 5mm thick.”

When choosing which filament to use, Samson had to consider the different properties of ABS and PLA. “ABS is a bit more flexible,” he explains. “PLA is strong, it’s rigid, but it’s a little bit brittle. So for this type of project, ABS is a better choice, because the cage has to flex a little bit to get the bottle in and out.”

Testing and Re-working

Once Samson had a prototype in hand, it was time for biking veteran Kelley to test it out. After taking the new Doodled bottle cage through a variety of terrains, Kelley was pleased with the results, but still felt there were more improvements to be made. “The cage performed well and there was no sign the bottle was going to launch at any point, and it was very easy to get the bottle in and out while riding,” she says. “But I heard a small crack the first time I loaded the bottle into the cage, and the fit around the bottle was not snug and this reduced contact area with the bottle.”

As an end result, Kelley felt a sturdier design was necessary. “The bottle flexes the plastic cage a lot, and I would ultimately not feel confident about the durability of the design,” she says. It was back to the drawing board for Samson. “I did some research, checking how other bottle cages look,” he says. “I found a few designs that had a whole ring around the bottle instead of the two arms.”

"At first I thought this design was going to be a fail, as off the bike it was tough getting a bottle in and out." Share

With Kelley’s feedback in mind, Samson thought this new design could provide the stability and tighter fit around the bottle that the first prototype lacked. “Molding the cage to the bottle, this one has got a lot of gripping power and a lot of friction, so the bottle won’t move anywhere when you’re riding,” he says.

“At first I thought this design was going to be a fail,” Kelley admits, “as off the bike it was tough getting a bottle in and out.” But Samson was confident this new design would be an improvement.

And Kelley was pleasantly surprised. “It is totally rock solid!” she says. “Once loaded on the bike—and with a small adjustment on my part on the angle—I loaded and unloaded the bottle while riding easily.” Kelley also found another bonus of the new prototype: “I also like the minimal look of this design on the bike.”

Creating concepts for practical DIYs requires a continual process of prototyping and testing, but Samson says that in the end you can wind up with some great results.

The first step, he recommends, is to copy. “Copy existing products, and then go from there,” he explains. “Modify it to fit your needs.”

Innovation for Creative Solutions

Samson used this same principal when creating an action camera mount for Kelley’s bike. After researching existing mounting solutions, he was able to better understand how he could begin to construct his own. “Some mounts have a hinge on one side for opening and closing,” he says, “but it’s kind of hard to make a hinge out of Doodled plastic, so I made a whole ring in one piece, and made it a little flexible.”

Adapting a commercial design for custom use was exactly what Kelley was looking for. “While camera mounts for round handlebars such as mine are commercially available, I liked that the mount was custom designed for my handlebars and therefore I could place it exactly where I wanted so it didn’t get in the way,” she says. “Also the Doodled mount is considerably less bulky and lighter than the commercial ones available, which is always important for weight-conscious roadies.”

When designing the mount, Samson was faced with a new array of issues and problems to overcome. During the prototyping process, he says it’s important to experiment and take risks to find solutions. In this case, Samson found that mixing materials was the best fix for the mount. “I had to use FLEXY on the inside of the ring to provide grip,” he explains. “The inside surface was too smooth, and when it grabbed the handlebar it would still move a little bit even when you screwed the bolt really tight.” When faced with a problem, finding creative solutions is key. “I put the FLEXY inside basically to act like a tire tread to grip onto the handle bar,” he says.

And road-testing confirmed his mixed-filament experiment. “The addition of FLEXY provided excellent grip, and meant there was no rotation even when riding on rough bumpy surfaces,” Kelley says.

With DIY projects like this, Samson says it’s all about adapting designs to fit what you can do, while getting the results you want. “It might not be the best looking product, or be good for selling to the public,” he says, “but if it works, then it’s a good DIY project.”

Making Models True to Life

Creating scale models is all about detail. To create stunning replicas that remain true to the original takes careful planning and precise execution.

Cornelia Kuglmeier knows just how detailed a Doodled model can be. An artist and teacher with a passion for architecture, Cornelia has successfully recreated several detailed models of world-famous buildings. In addition to creating a scale replica of the Sagrada Familia basilica in Barcelona, she’s also worked on miniature versions of iconic Modernist architectural masterpieces like the Farnsworth House and Fallingwater.

Cornelia says that when using the 3Doodler to create scale models, all it takes to get started is an idea, a steady hand, and a lot of patience.

Not Every Building Has Four Plain Walls

“You can choose any type of building you like,” Cornelia says, “or invent a new one!” Style, period, or complexity of the structure aren’t as important as your personal interest and passion.

If creating a unique building of your own design, Cornelia recommends making a draft of the building using 3D software first. “Make sure you have all the walls, the roof and the floor,” she says. “Show every side to have a good idea on what it will look like when it’s finished.”

When creating a replica of an existing building, it may be easier to know how the finished piece should look—but this also means execution must be precise. Cornelia says when making models of famous buildings, she always begins by finding a floor plan. “This is crucial!” she says. The floor plan allows for better construction, even if your main concern is how the outside of the building will look.

"You need a stencil for every side of every element of your building. Walk around it in your imagination and count corners and spaces for every floor. " Share

In addition, Cornelia says it’s important to find photos, plans or drawings for every side of the structure. “I also hunt for detailed pictures that show decoration or any other special things,” Cornelia reveals, as often these small additions can provide the key to capturing the essence of the architecture.

Detail may also determine the size of the model. “The more detail you want to show, the bigger your Doodled building will be,” Cornelia explains. “If necessary, simplify forms or leave out details that are less important.”

With floor plans, reference photos, and a concept of size and scale, you can begin to create your stencils. “You need a stencil for every side of every element of your building,” Cornelia says. “Walk around it in your imagination and count corners and spaces for every floor. Not every building has just four plain walls.”

Plain Edges and Clean Corners

When recreating any piece of architecture, an awareness of materials can be just as important as understanding the structure. “Dots, short strokes, thin, medium or thick plain lines, checkered spaces, zig-zag or chevron patterns—all result in different surfaces which can mimic different materials,” Cornelia explains.

Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater

When creating a scale replica of Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous Fallingwater, Cornelia had to test a variety of techniques in order to achieve all the different textures which came from various construction materials and the natural environment around the house. The trick when creating a model is to experiment and test what your 3Doodler can do. “Choose what looks most similar to what you want to build.”

But precision is key when it comes to model building. “Plain edges and clean corners are essential to create fine rectangular buildings,” Cornelia says. “It helps to draw the outlines first and then fill in the spaces.”

For curved areas, Cornelia recommends finding something to use as a mould rather than attempting to Doodle free-hand. “Think about hot-airing a flat Doodled piece around a bottle, vase, or whatever you have that suits the size you need,” she says.

Time and Patience

When constructing your model, relying on a scaled version of the original floor plan can help ensure the form and shape are correct. Cornelia recommends working from bottom to top, and inside to outside, which is what she did when creating her scale model of the Farnsworth House, designed and constructed by Modernist architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

“Try as much as possible to Doodle your pieces together at invisible spaces,” Cornelia says, “from the inside, from underneath, and so on.”

Farnsworth House by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Cornelia says not to be afraid to use outside materials to clean up stray strands, like scissors, knives or other blades. When building any structure, having edges fit together is key to recreating an accurate portrayal of the final building.

But most important of all, says Cornelia, is time and patience. Precision is vital, and mistakes do happen. Enjoy the process, and keep the final result in sight.

If you’re looking to try your hand at creating scale models, 3Doodler will be releasing both of these amazing buildings as 3Doodler Create Project Kits in collaboration with National Trust for Historic Preservation and Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, so that anyone can re-create these eye-catching structures themselves.

5 Lifesaving DIY Doodles for the Home

When it comes to the things we use most around the home, small breaks are bound to happen with the general everyday wear and tear of life. It’s unavoidable, but that doesn’t mean it’s not fixable!

With your 3Doodler in hand, you can DIY your own fixes and repairs for all sorts of breaks and damages that can happen around the house.

1. Broken Scissors Just Won’t Cut it

It’s tragic when an otherwise great tool is wrecked by one little bit of broken plastic. That’s what happened to these scissors. While the blades are still fine, they won’t work properly when the plastic handles are broken.

Fortunately that’s a quick fix with the 3Doodler! To fill in the cracks, PLA will create a strong, solid hold. You can also weld the plastic together with the Create’s hot tip. Using a combination of both will give a lasting solution that will make your scissors stronger than ever.

A bit of extra plastic and a little welding keeps your scissors snipping

2. Saving a Stand for the Kitchen

When this cutting board stand started to crack, it looked like the end for this handy storage unit. What good is a stand that won’t hold up?

Luckily all it took was a bit of repair work with the 3Doodler to make it like new – and possibly even stronger than before! With added PLA plastic which welded and reinforced the stress points of the stand, it can now continue to hold up under constant kitchen use.

3. Zapping a Problem Zipper

There’s nothing more frustrating than a broken zipper. Whether on a bag, jacket, purse or any other zip-able item, you need that zipper to do it’s job!

Fortunately, there’s this handy fix and video tutorial from Creative World to help you Doodle your way back to a fully functional zipper.

4. A Doodle DIY for Your Deck

A quick Doodled replacement makes this home repair a snap!
The plastic ring that hold the umbrella in place on this deck table kept breaking. And a wobbly umbrella can upset the whole balance, and ruin an afternoon outdoors!

Fortunately, all it takes is your 3Doodler and a bit of measuring, and you can create your own custom ring that withstand even more wear and tear than the original. You can use ABS or PLA to create the ring, and could even add some FLEXY around the bottom and inside to give it a non-slip upgrade!

5. A 3DIY Fix for Your 3D Prints

It’s the repair that sparked the whole idea for the 3Doodler: what do you do when your 3D printer misses a line, or a 3D print breaks or cracks? Fill it in using your very own hand-held 3D printer, of course!

The 3Doodler is perfect for fixing damages or accidents that can happen to your 3D prints. Don’t waste the time and effort involved in 3D printing, just make a quick repair and you’re good to go.


With so many options to fix and repair, the 3Doodler can save not only your tools and home items, but can also save you lots of money by avoiding costly replacements!

Not sure where to start when it comes to using your 3Doodler around the house? Check out our Hot Tips section to get insider ideas on how get the most out of your 3Doodler, and have you Doodling like a pro.

Show us your 3Doodler DIY fixes by tagging us @3Doodler and using #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate

7 DIY Hacks to Doodle for Your Camera

Whether you’re a professional photographer, photo-hobbyist, or like getting the perfect shot for your Instagram, you’ve probably invested time and money in your cameras and equipment. As with any investment, you want to protect your kit and make sure you get the most out of it.

With that in mind, we’ve put together these lifesaving hacks that you can DIY with your 3Doodler to extend the life of your gear. From top-of-the-line gear or a single point-and-shoot, we’ve got the fixes for you!

1. Repair a Cracked Lens Cap

A Doodled fix can save a cracked lens cap
One of the most important components of any camera – and often the most expensive part – is the lens. Keeping your lens as pristine as possible is a necessity, but the lens cap can too often be lost or broken.

A cracked cap that no longer grips onto your lens is just as bad as a lost lens cap. That’s where adding plastic with the 3Doodler, while holding the pieces together saves the day – and possibly hundreds to thousands of dollars for a new lens.

2. Replace a Lost Lens Cap

Lost your lens cap altogether? Doodle a new one to custom fit your lens!

1. Hold the lens flat on a piece of paper and trace the circular outer edge.
2. Using ABS or PLA, fill the inside of the circle with 3Doodled plastic. Tip: Make it smooth and solid by moving your hand in slow, steady, and consistent lines. Hold it up against a light when you’re done to see if there are any gaps or holes that need to be filled in.
3. Place some aluminium foil over the end of the lens and Doodle around the outer edge using FLEXY plastic. Make sure that there are no gaps or holes in the cap so that no dust or dirt can get in.
4. Hold the flat circular piece you’ve created to the FLEXY ring and use some more FLEXY and Doodle the two pieces together. Add some FLEXY further down the sides of the lens to make sure that it stays in place. Tip: Be sure to add lots of plastic when connecting the pieces together, as you want them to be very solid and sealed up nice and tight.

3. Doodle Yourself a New Tripod

With a bit of patience there’s no reason why you can’t create a whole new custom tripod using the 3Doodler! We recommend ABS plastic for the best rigidity. We whipped up this smartphone tripod, with adjustable legs and FLEXY feet to keep it standing right in place.

A custom tripod matches any model phone.

4. Repair a Broken Tripod Adjustment Knob

Repair the grip, reattach the knob, or Doodle a new one.

Whether you’re using a DSLR with a telephoto lens or your smartphone, the tripod is an invaluable asset. With all the adjustable parts, a broken knob can be a real pain! With your 3Doodler and your choice of ABS, PLA, or FLEXY, you can fix a broken knob, repair the rubber grip like in the photo below, or if it’s fallen off just Doodle a completely new one right on to the end of the screw. If your new Doodled piece is loose, simply add a little extra plastic and adjust your tripod to the perfect angle for your next great shot.

5. Replace a Missing Tripod No-Slip Bed

FLEXY is perfect for creating a non-slip surface.

Got an old, but quality tripod with just a minor issue? Make it new again with a few Doodled repairs! The one below lost the rubber bed that the camera rests on – without it, the mounting screw won’t tighten and the camera remains loose. A fix that’s quick but lasting is to create a small washer with ABS or PLA plastic which works as a perfect spacer to hold the camera firmly in place.

Want to take this fix a bit further? Using FLEXY, recreate the original piece and affix it back onto the tripod for good!

Tip: Place a piece of paper over the top of the tripod and sketch a stencil outline to work from.

6. Replace a Strap Adjuster

If you’ve got one camera, two cameras, or a whole bag full of them, chances are you’re dealing with a few straps, each one of them with at least one clip or adjuster. Breaking one can seem like the end of the line, but with your 3Doodler you’ve got an easy way to DIY your strap as good as new.

It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3:
1. Doodle a letter “E” with horizontal lines as long as the width of your strap.
2. Slide the “E” over the strap so the prongs are arranged like they were with the original piece.
3. Doodle a straight line down, connecting the the three points of the “E” and securing your straps in place. Tip: Make sure to Doodle this piece nice and thick, and ensure that the plastic really melts to itself so that it is sturdy and holds the straps in place.

7. Repair or Reinforce Cables

Cables, cables, everywhere! Whether charging cables or the cords for your lighting setup, these are the veins that power your gear. Your gear can’t work without cables, and neither can you!

That’s why it’s crucial to give them support when they show any signs of wear and tear. A bit of FLEXY around the stem of a damaged cable can reinforce it and make it even stronger than before.

A bit of fLEXY does the trick to keep your cables from cracking.

Repairing and replacing parts with the 3Doodler also serves as a way of customizing and identifying your gear in no time at all! Then again if you’re looking to keep things on the down low, you can match colors or use black filament so that your repairs won’t even be noticed.

Show us your DIY hacks by tagging us @3Doodler and using #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate

Picture-Perfect Party Decorations

Everyone wants to throw a picture-perfect party! We’ve chosen 5 party ideas and upgraded them with Doodled variety to take your decorations to the next level. Doodle-IY your way to throwing a uniquely epic party.

Fresher Fruit Refreshments

Decorated mason jars are all the rage for a summer themed party. We’ve seen watermelon decorations all over! But why just stop with watermelon? Bring on a variety of fruity fun and vary your flavors with Doodled additions!

If you’re going to be Doodling onto glass, PLA and FLEXY are the plastics to choose! Both stick great to glass surfaces, so you can upgrade your glassware with any Doodled design you desire!

All That Glitters

There’s something about gold that gives a party that upscale, glamorous feeling. In our Doodled versions, the details really shine and you can show off your skills not only as host but as artist as well! Float like a feather, or make hearts flutter by adding some accents of color with a butterfly napkin ring with FLEXY flying wings.

If you’re looking to add some glitz to your Doodles, check out the FLEXY gold and Gangsta’ Gold PLA.

Stir Things Up

Customized drink stirrers are full of class and elegance. And with your 3Doodler in hand, you can create your own and personalize them to make your party unique! Get specific with sayings perfect for your party theme, or Doodle ones with your guests’ names for an unforgettable party favor!

Looking for ideas on how to improve your Doodle writing? Be sure to check out our Hot Tips section for loads of quick ideas on how to get the most out of your 3Doodler!

Go Wild

When you’re looking for cuteness overload for your next party why not take inspiration from nature? Doodle up some animal details and dress up your fruit! Not only do they make adorable decorative accents, but these awesome animals can do double-duty as a healthy snack for your party-goers too!

All of our plastics are biodegradable and recyclable. Our new 3Doodler Start eco-plastics even biodegrade in your home compost!

Let Your Imagination Take Flight

We love the idea of taking something ordinary and making it extraordinary with Doodled additions. With that in mind, we decided to wing it and created a flock of flawless cupcakes, complete with flamingos, swans, and peacocks!

If your next party is picture-perfect with Doodled decorations, be sure to show us! Use #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate when you post!

3Doodler for DIY

While the 3Doodler can be used to make incredible sculptures and works of art, it’s practical applications can’t be overlooked.

With a tool as diverse as this, the DIY options are endless. Here’s eight examples of simple fixes or DIY ideas for your 3Doodler.

1. Give Your Phone an Upgrade

Looking for a style switch up? Doodle yourself a new phone case. No need to look like everyone else, make yourself a case that will give your mobile phone some personal flair while keeping it safe.

2. Make Your Own Doodled Clock

Make a statement with your home decor and create your own interior design pieces with personal flare. For wall pieces, hard-setting PLA works great, and will help you Doodle pieces that will last.

3. Repair Snaps in a Snap

Instead of buying a new pair of glasses, fix them with your 3Doodler. PLA adheres to metal better than ABS, so it works great for quick fixes like this one. Simply join the two pieces and Doodle around the break point. This little fix makes for quite the talking point too!

4. A DIY That Holds Water

Repairing cracks in plastic cups or soap dishes is easy with your 3Doodler. Both ABS and PLA work well for this kind of quick fix. ABS is excellent for plastic-on-plastic Doodling because of its higher melting point which helps weld plastics together, and PLA has naturally strong bonding properties. The PLA Clearly range also makes for more discreet fixes!

5. Doodle Your Own Wallet

Use FLEXY to create a hand-made plastic wallet of your very own! For a more fabric-like look, push the nozzle of your 3Doodler flush with the surface you are Doodling on, moving it quickly to form a thin film of Doodled plastic.

6. Repairing Your Home Appliances

3Doodler came to the rescue to fix the shell of this broken vacuum cleaner. A simple repair saves time and money, and gets your back on track with minimal fuss!

7. Lighten Things Up

Get creative and make your own lampshade. This lampshade was constructed for our display window at the MoMA Design Store. Made from over 50 small triangles, the pieces were welded together like a mosaic to produce this stunning lampshade. Pick your own colours and style – it’s simply a matter of joining the pieces.

8. Mix Doodling for Dynamic Projects

Louis DeRosa was able to combine a passion for electronics and the 3Doodler by using it to help make his own Hexacopter. As you can see, when you start to apply your imagination to 3Doodling, the sky really is the limit!


With so many options to fix and repair, the 3Doodler is your go-to DIY tool for any occasion!

Not sure where to start when it comes to using your 3Doodler for DIY? Check out our Hot Tips section to get insider ideas on how get the most out of your 3Doodler, and have you Doodling like a pro.

Show us your 3Doodler DIY fixes by tagging us @3Doodler and using #3Doodler and #WhatWillYouCreate

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